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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 1991-1992)"



Demon Sports 

B All-Southland Conference teams released, pl2 

■ Rube named Northwestern first Softball All-American, p 13 

■ Sports in Brief and the Recruitment report, pl3 




Natchitoches-NSU 
Folk Festival, pl5 

■ Celebrating the music of North 
Louisiana 

■ Arts and crafts displays 





TlieSummer Sauce 



June 11, 1991 


The Summer Magazine of the Current Sauce 


Vol. 80, No. 1 





The Front Page 

Student Aid 
Bill Before 
House 

Sports Hall 
of Fame 
Preview 

Summer 
Dinner 
Theatre 



WHAT 

t d8 WHEN IT'S 




Movie Review 

Don't Catch 
The "Hawk" pie 




When 
summer 
comes, it's 
hard to 
find 

things to 
do, but we 
found 
ways to be 
the heat! 
plO 




Mr. 
Sna-BaU 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 



no-Ball Flavors 



RAI OW 

RASPBERRY 
BLUEBERRY 

STRWBERRY 



LEMON 
PEACH 

BMAUk 
NECTAR 
CHERRY 



SPEARMINT 
WATERMELON 
DREAMSISCLE 
BLACKBERRY 

LEMON-UME 
TUTTI-FRUTTI 



NOTICE 



IMPORTANT MESSAGE 
FOR STUDENTS 

FROM THE 

NATCHITOCHES 
HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB 



YOU may join for the summer for only $75.00 (That includes 
tax and entry fee.) All you have to do is pay up front. With this 
great special, you may use racquetball, basketball, aerobics, 
weights, stairclimbers and we have men's and women's 
dressing rooms and protein bar. 

IF you want to pay by the month: 
$25.00 entry fee 

$22.50 a month (summer contract) 

WE ARE IN WALKING DISTANCE FROM ANYWHERE 

ON CAMPUS 

LOCATED ACROSS FROM NSU 



400 College Avenue 
357-0936 



Open 7 Days 
a Week 



Just Friends 

'A Quaint Eatery In The Historic District" 




Specializing In Homemade Soups, 

Sandwiches And Desserts 

Try Our Almond Tea 
Open Monday Thru Saturday 
10 a.m.— 4 p.m. 



DELIVER TO CAMPUS SPECIAL PEPPERONI 



10 



II 



MED. 



LARGE 




99 

Plus 

Tax 




99 

Plus 
Tax 




99 

Pius 
Tax 




o 

ON 
GO. 



138 Hwy 1 So. 
Natchitoches, LA 
(318) 352-6382 



2 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



The Front Page 



WASHINGTON— Congressman Tom 
Petri (K-Wisc. i introduced student loan 
legislation May 14 which he said would 
"radically improve America's student 
loan system while saving the taxpayers 
billions of dollars " Cong. Sam 
Gejdenson ( D-Conn. i joined Cong. Petri 
as principal cosponsor of'ine legislation. 

The Income-Dependent Education 
Assistance Act (IDEA) would make up 
to $70,000 of loans available f or most 
college and graduate-level students and 
up to $143,000 for medical students. 
Under the income-dependent approach, 
former students would repay the loans 
based on their incomes after leaving 
Bchool. 

"There would be no fixed repay- 
ment schedule. Rather, repayment 
Would automatically be stretched out as 
long as people need it to be," said Petri, 
a member of the Education and Labor 
Committee. 

Those with high incomes after 
leaving school would be expected to 
repay relatively quickly at slightly 



Student Aid Bill Will Make Repayment Easier 



"Repayment would automatically be stretched 
out as long as people need it to be. 



effective interest rates which would 
help to subsidize those with low 
incomes after school. 

"Those who expect to make high 
incomes would still he attracted to the 
program by its still-reasonable terms 
and by its flexibility," Petri said. 

IDEA loan payments would be 
calculated and collected as part of 
former students' income taxes. 

"Under IDEA, every student would 
be able to take out loans for his or her 
education with complete confidence that 
repayment would be affordable, no 
matter what income the student ends 
up earning after leaving school," Petri 
said. "If you loose your job, get sick or 
take time off to raise kids, your loan is 
automatically rescheduled." 

Petri noted that any loan amounts 



left unpaid after 25 years would be 
wiped off the books The degree of 
subsiay provided in this way would 
depend on a borrower's total income 
over the 25 years. "The oniy way to 
avoid significant loan repayments is to 
have a very low income for much of your 
working life," Petri said. "You would 
have to be very unfortunate to qualify 
for substantial amounts of loan forgive- 
ness." 

The IDEA program is designed to 
be self- financing while being a better 
deal for students than the current 
student loan programs which IDEA 
would supplement. Petri identified four 
sources of savings in the current 
student loan programs. 

■ The IDEA program would have 
"virtually no student loan defaults," 



Petri said. "Because the loans are 
automatically rescheduled based on 
income, there would be no reason to 
default. Further. IDEA repayments are 
defined as income taxes. Evading 
repayment would be tax evasion. So 
there would be no opportunity to 
default." 

■ The cost of loan capital under 
IDEA would be lower because the IDEA 
program would use direct governmental 
capital rather than bank capital which, 
under current programs, comes with a 
politically-negotiated high interest rate. 

■ Loan subsidies under the IDEA 
program would be targeted precisely to 
those who need them, and to the extent 
of their need. These subsidies would be 
balanced by premium payments from 
high income graduates. 

■ The IDEA program would be 
much simpler to administer. There 
would be no family needs analysis at 
the beginning, and repayment would be 
collected by the IRS as a part of income 
taxes. 



Six to be inducted into 
La. Sports Hall of Fame 



% Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

K The Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame will 
Induct six new members Saturday, June 22 at 
an induction banquet at the Student Union 
ballroom. The Ixiuisiana Sports writers Associa- 
tion, which sponsors the Hal of Fame, will also 
jive two Distinguished Service Awards in Sports 
gpurnalism at the Ceremony. 

. The new inductees in the Hall of Fame 
include football stars Gary "Big Hands" Johnson 
(Grambling, San Diego Chargers,San Francisco 
4 9ers>, Roy "Moonie" Winston (LSU, Minnesota 
bikings ) and Charlie Tolar (Northwestern, 
Houston Oilers); along with basketball player 
Don Chaney (Southern, Boston Celtics), now 
^ach of the Houston rockets; Basketball coach 
Ralph Ward (McNeese); and Football player and 
^>ach Buddy Parker (Centenary, Detroit Lions). 
Ward and Parker will be inducted posthu- 
mously. This group brings the total number of 
Members to 139. 

wk*' Shreveport Times columnist Bill Mclntyre 
and 

{deceased New Orleans Item sports editor 
**©d Digby will receive the Distinguished 




Service Award. Mclntyre, who has been with 
the Times for 39 years, is the past sports editor, 
and has won many awards, the most recent the 
1988 Louisiana Columnist of the Year. Digby 
was the influence behind the founding of the 
Sugar Bowl Classic, and served as the director of 
the Sugar Bowl from 1947 until his death in 
1958. He also helped organize many youth 
organizations, and founded the prestigious New 
Orleans Quarterback Club. 

Mclntyre and Digby will be listed on a 
permanent display in the Hall of Fame in 
Prather Coliseum. 

The Hall of Fame weekend will start Friday, 
June 21 with a reception at the Holiday Inn at 7 
p.m.. Saturday morning will feature a continen- 
tal breakfast at the Country Club at 8:30, then a 
press conference at 9 a.m. The yearly golf 
tournament begins at 10:30 a.m., along with the 
Ladies Historic Tour. 

The evening activities begin at 5:30 p.m. 
with a reception and tour of the Hall of Fame. 
The induction Banquet starts at 7 p.m., and is 
followed by a post-induction reception at the 
Holiday Inn at 9:15 p.m. 




Three cheerleaders practice during the National Cheerleader 
Association camp being held at Northwestern. For more 
information the cheerleader camps this summer contact Reath a 
Cole in the Admissions Office. 



C1T T 



Theatre To Debut Summer Dinner Theatre 



ry boy angles for his receiving set for a.tvhole world 



that ODened 





News in Brief 



Miss Louisiana Pageant 

The Miss Louisiana 
Pageant will feature 40 
beautiful contestants vying for 
the coveted crown of Miss 
Louisiana June 13-15 at the 
Monroe Civic Center. 

This years pageant, 
"Here's To Broadway," will 
feature Miss Louisiana, Linnea 
Fayard and music from 
Anything Goes, Lullaby of 
Broadway, Cats, Les 
Mise rabies and Phantom of the 
Opera. Master of ceremonies 
will be Steven Craig, singer, 
actor, dancer from New York 
City. 

The contestants will be 
judged in four areas — inter- 
view, swimsuit, talent and 
evening gown. 

Patty Breckenridge, 
Northwestern'8 Lady of the 
Bracelet, will appear in the 
pageant. 

The pageant will be aired 
statewide on June 15 by KNOE 
Channel 8 in Monroe. 

For ticket information or 
reserved setting call (318) 329- 
2338. , 



Drum Corps International 
stops at Northwestern 

For the second year, 
Northwestern State University 
will host one of the tour stops 



on The Drum Corps Interna- 
tional circuit. 

Five of the top 30 drum 
corps in North America will 
take part in the competition to 
be held August 11 in Turpin 
Stadium. 

Scheduled to compete at 
Northwestern as part of DCI's 
1991 Summer Music Games 
are the Marauders of 
Longview, Wash., the Blue 
Knights from Denver, the 
Magic from Orlando, Fla.,the 
Phantom Regiment from 
Rockford, 111., and the Cava- 
liers from Chicago. 

The stop in Natchitoches is 
one of six stops around the 
country leading up to the DCI 
World Championships to be 
held in Dallas on Aug. 13. 

Tickets are now on sale at 
the NSU Creative and Pre- 
forming Arts Box Office. 
Tickets are $10 for advanced 
reserved seats and $11 at the 
door. 

Freshman Connection 

The first of four summer 

day, June 20. 

Three other sessions are 
set for July 11-12, July 15-16 
and July 25-26 on 
Northwestern's campus, 



according to Gail Jones, 
director of Student Support 

j Services and coordinator of 
Freshman Connection. 

Attending Freshman 
Connection will give incoming 

i freshman an opportunity to 
fulfill university orientation 
requirements and register for 
fall classes. 

Those attending will meet 
university administrators, 
faculty, staff and students who 
will answer questions about 
university life. 

The cost of the program is 
$60. For more information on 
Freshman Connection 1991 call 
(318) 357-5901. 

Equine Judging Team place 
4th in competition 

The equine judging team 
from Northwestern State 
University placed fifth out of 
19 teams in the Spring Horse 
Judging Contest held recently 
at New Mexico State Univer- 
sity. 

The team is coached by 

Rebecca Merchant. Team 

I members. are Abbv Lioataof . 
iTautiiiiAJtiieB, jonri ^.effgief or 

Winnfield, Terry Barron of 

Folsom, Laura Davis of 

Marthaville and alternate 

Angela Hebert of Baton Rouge. 

Licata was the highest 



placing finisher for Northwest- 
ern, placing 12th out of 100. 
Zeagler was the fourth highest 
individual in performance 
judging. Northwestern placed 
fourth in individual judging. 

Texas A&M won the 
competition followed by Kansas 
State, Texas Tech, Middle 
Tennessee, Northwestern, 
Colorado State, Cal State- 
Fresno, Abilene Christian and 
Oklahoma State. 

Microcomputer Course 
Offered 

The Northwestern State 
University Small Business 
Development Center will offer 
a course "Microcomputer 
Applications for Small Busi- 
ness" June 18-20 in Morrison 
Hall Room 206 on the North- 
western Campus. 

The nine-hour workshop is 
a hands-on introduction to how 
complete introductory lessons 
on Word Perfect 5.1, the 
newest version of the top word 
processing language. Students 
will then be introduced to 

Lotus 1 -2-3 the tnn aollino \ 

spreadsheet. 

Some typing skill is 
required of participants in the 
course. A diskette will be 
provided. 

Class size is limited. 



Enrollment is on a first come, 
first serve basis. Preregistra- 
tion is required for all work- 
shop participants. For more 
information and preregistra- 
tion, call the NSU-SBDC at 
(318) 357-5611. 

NSU-NASA Space Institute 

High school students are 
on campus this week expand- 
ing their knowledge of space at 
the NSU-NASA Space Insti- 
tute. 

The program, designed for 
students entering the 12th 
grade, has two sessions. The 
first is June 9-15. The second 
session is set for June 16-22. 

The courses are being 
taught by three Northwestern- 
NASA research scientist, Dr. 
Wayne Hyde in chemistry. Dr. 
Donald Ryan in mathematics 
and Dr. Gary White in physics. 
The three have been involved 
in joint research activities at 
NASA's Marshall Space Flight 
Center in Huntsville, Ala. 

"This is not like an 

astronaut teaching class. It 

±— i » r ^ 1 

topics relating to NASA 
history," said Hyde. 

For more information on 
the program , contact the NSU- 
NASA Space Institute at (318) 
357-5131. 



Summer Memberships for Students 




10,000 lbs. Free Weights 

Nautilus 

Body Masters 

Stair Masters 

Life Cycles 

Racquetball 



• Swimming Pool with: 

• Sundeck 

• Whirlpool 

• Sauna 

• Steamroom 

• Step Aerobics 

• Aqua Aerobics 




B0DYW0RLD HEALTH & RACQUETBALL 



1007 Claudia Street 



357-9560 



4 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



News in Brief 



Miss Louisiana Pageant 



La n ham exhibit in Orville 
Hanchey Gallery 

A senior exhibit by Elena 
Lanham of Natchitoches will 
remain on display in the 
Orville Hanchey Gallery until 
June 14. 

Lanham's exhibit concen- 
trates on etchings, a print 
made by coating a copper or 
zinc plate with an acid- 
resistant substance and 
drawing through this ground 
exposing the metal. The plate 
is submerged in acid which bits 
the unprotected area. The 
acid-resistant substance is 
removed from the plate which 
is inked and printed on paper. 

Lanham has studied 
throughout the United States 
and Europe and has taught art 
in the Middle East before 
studying at Northwestern. 

Students work at Disney 

Four students are working 
for Disney World this summer. 
Jeff Breaux of New Iberia, a 
junior advertising design 
major; Ella Choe of Marrero, a 
junior in the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College; Tina Foret of 
Houma, a junior broadcast 
major and Deanna Gonzalez of 
Arlington, Texas, a sophomore 
theatre major are working at 
the Walt Disney World Resort 



in Orlando, Fla. 

Disney's World College 
Program is a unique educa- 
tional work and interpersonal 
relationship program designed 
to increase practical knowledge 
of the leisure industry. 

The students are paid for 
their work in various areas of 
the park. They also take part 
in 30 hours of classroom 
instruction. Classes are taught 
by the management of different 
divisions of Walt Disney World. 

Student works for CIA 
through Co-Op Program 

Iris Shendell Jackson of 
Natchitoches, a junior com- 
puter information system 
major at Northwestern, is 
working with the Central 
Intelligence Agency this 
summer. 

Jackson received the job 
through Northwestern 's 
Cooperative Education Pro- 
gram. 

She was offered the job 
after a number of interviews 
including and in-depth inter- 
view in Washington, D.C. 

Student trainees are 
selected with established 
Cooperative Education pro- 
gram around the nation. 
Students work on an alternat- 
ing semester basis and are 



expected to spend a minimum 
of three periods on the job prior 
to graduation. 

Applications be accepted for 
Truman scholarship 

Applications are now being 
accepted in Northwestern's 
Department of Social Sciences 
for the Harry S. Truman 
Scholarship program. 

Up to 92 Truman scholar- 
ships will be awarded to 
juniors at four year colleges 
and universities and sopho- 
mores at two year colleges 
around the nation. 

Students are nominated by 
faculty members for the 
scholarship. Those students 
must have established strong 
records of public and commu- 
nity service, be committed to 
careers in government or 
elsewhere in the public sector, 
have outstanding leadership 
potential, possess intellectual 
strength and analytical 
abilities and are likely to 
preform well in graduate 
school. 

Nominees must be in the 
upper third of their class and 
must be a U.S. citizen. 

The nomination deadline is 
December 2. For more infor- 
mation, contact Dr. Maxine 
Taylor at 357-6195. 




Patty Breckenridge, Northwestern's Lady of the Bracelet, 
will appear in the Miss Louisiana pageant June 13-15 at the 
Monroe Civic Center. 

She will be one of 40 beautiful contestants vying for the 
coveted crown of Miss Louisiana. 

The pageant will be aired statewide on June 15 by KNOE 
Channel 8 in Monroe. 




KOIKE 

Meats 

Beef 

Pork 

Ham 

Sausage 

Hot Links 

Pork Ribs (small) 

Turkey (breast) 



SMOKED 

"30 Years Combined Experience"' 
400 SL Denis 352-6164 

(Corner of St. Denis & 4th) 
One Block from (he Main I'osl OITicc 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 
10:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Sat. 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 



Sandwiches 
SI. 95 

Pounds 
S6.50 

Plates 
S4.75 



Small Poboy S2.50 

Large Pobov S3. 50 

Rib Sandwich S3.50 

Mixed Plates 
S4.95 



Chip Beef Sandwiches 2 for SI. 50 or 85c Each 



Orders- 1/2 lb. of meat with bread S3. 95 
Salad S1.69 To Go Salad SI.69 



Beans, 
Order 
H Pint 
Pint 



Potato Salad or Coleslaw 

80e Corn 55* 
SI. 00 Chips 50c 
SI. 65 Pickles 50c 
Peppers 15c 



Chip Beef Sandwiches 
2 for $1.00 every Saturday! 

Whole Boneless Hams S4.00 lb. 

Whole Boneless Turkey Breast . . . S4.00 lb. 



Drinks 7()C & 90c 

Coke Tea 

Dr. Pepper Pink Lemonade 

Sprite 

Diet Coke Peer $ 1 .00 



WE CATER 

We Smoke Chickens S1.00 ea. 

We Smoke Turkeys (any size) S8.95 

We Custom Cook Meat 50c ib. 



NAVY 

You and the Navy, 
Full Speed Ahead. 




Navy Recruiting Station 
121 Royal Street 
Natchitoches, LA 71457-5019 
(31 8) 352-5757 



TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 5 



The 
Summer 
Sauce 



Published every other week during 
the summer by the students of 
Northwestern State University 

Van Reed, Editor 
Jon Terry, Sports Editor 
Judy Francis, Staff 
Jason Oldham, Staff 
Damian Domingue, Staff 
LeonardWilliams, Staff 
Brian Shirley, Staff 
Russ Harris, Artist 
Chris Young, Photographer 
Eben Cook, Advertising 
Tom Whitehead, Adviser 

How to Reach 
TheSummerSauce. 

(318)357-5456 Student 
Publications Office 

(318) 357-5096 Editor's Office 

(318) 357-5456 Advertising 

(318) 357-5213 Adviser's Office 

(318)357-6564 Fax # 

225 Kyser Hall 
P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 



Editor's Journal 



A Better Voice 
For Students 





hen I think of summer I think of being lazy 
and hot. So when 1 was confronted with the 
task of editing the summer Current Sauce, I 
jumped at the opportunity to make it a 
relaxing, enjoyable magazine that would 
represent the students better. 

The Sauce will offer you a comprehensive 
look at news and sports at Northwestern 
combined with light-hearted and entertaining 
features to make for informative, but relaxed, reading. 

This summer we are offering several different ways to 
express your opinions in the Sauce. We have designed two 
call in forums for you to tell us what is on your mind. 

The Sauce Poll will be a biweekly forum on issues that 
affect Northwestern and Northwestern's students. Every 
other week we will put a question before you. All we ask of 
you is to call in and tells us "Yes' or 
'No.' We will publish the results in 



i>u. we win puunsu uie results m 1_ T 7 T"> J T> 1 

the next paper. This is not a scien- Dy Vail KOdliey Keed 



tine poll, but it does allow us to see the intensity of 
feelings you have on certain issues. We will set 
certain hours to call. 

The Reader's Forum is a chance for students, 
faculty, staff and Natchitoches residents to call in 
and leave a brief statement on issues concerning 
them. We open up our phone lines each day and let 
you leave a message. We only ask that it be brief and 
pertain to something at Northwestern or in the news. We 
do reserve the right to edit. Inclusion of any and all mes- 
sage is left to the discretion of the editors. All we need is 
your name, address and telephone number. No anonymous 
message will be printed. 

Each week we will introduce you to a guest columnist. 
We will ask a student, faculty, or staff member of North- 
western to write a column on anything they like, thus 
providing you with another voice in the Sauce. Our regular 
columnists will continue to write on different issues each 
week. We have also added a sports column. "From the 
Locker Room" will provide our sports editors the chance to 
express their feeling on issues inside Demon Sports. 

Current Quotes are back. Our photographers will comb 
the campus asking students, faculty and staff questions 
and getting their opinions. Then we will print seven 
people's responses and pictures. 

We will continue to accept and encourage letters to the 
editor. Letters are the best way to express your opinions 
because we can offer you space to elaborate on an issue. 
We do reserve the right to edit letters and it is the discre- 
tion of the editors to which letters will be printed. We will 
except no anonymous letters, however we will withhold 
your name at you request. 

These are just a few ways the Sauce will allow you to 
voice your opinions on issues in the news. It is just another 

step we are taking to better serve 
our readers: Northwestern stu- 



dents, faculty and staff. 



We Carry A Complete Line 
of Suntan Products 




CAUSEYS 



axmaa 



407 BienviDe Street, Natchitoches, La. 
Open Monday thru Saturday 
8 a.m.— 6 p.m. 



6 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 

i mil, &-iuf.<'.iMunmu;«»uV 

IHIHHHHIHIIHHIHlHHHiHF 



SHAKE UP YOUR STUDIES 
WITH A'TCBV" SHIVER. 

You have four tests, six papers, and two lab reports all due within the 
next twelve hours. You've had your nose in a book tor three davs solid and 
you are beginning to experience serious brain drain. You need to shake things 
up with a "TCBV Shiver., frozen yogurt treat. 

Choose from the great taste of Pineapple, Peaches. Blackberries, 
Blueberries, Bananas, SNICKERS* Bar, KUDOS* Granola Snacks, Reese' •> 
Pieces* , or "M&.M's"* Chocolate Candies blended in with "TCBVT* Frozen 
Yogurt, "TCBV." Frozen Yogurt has about hali the calories oi premium ice 
cream and is 96% fat-free. 



Cane River Snopping Center 
Natcnrtoches, LA 
352-9721 



ALL THE PIEASURE. NONE OF THE GUILT.. 

"TCBV" 

The Country*, Best Yogurt ■ 

10% Discount with NSU Student ID 



Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-10p.m. 
Sunday 12p.m.-10p.m. 




■ | ■ 



Guest Columnist 



I 

Open Letter 
To American 
Students 



/ share Masaryk's appreciation for the 

— _j 

American legacy of freedom, especially 
freedom of speech and press. 



n November, 1989, the 
students bf Czechoslo- 
vakia took to the 
streets arid launched a 
revolt that toppled the 
Communist regime. 
The students were 
inspired by Tomas 
Masaryk, the founder 
of the democratic republic that existed from 1918 until its 
destruction by Hitler in 1938. Masaryk, in turn, was a 
great admirer of the American political tradition, and in 
part modeled the Czechoslovak constitution after its 
American counterpart and Jefferson's Declaration of 
Independence. Masaryk valued the importance these two 
documents placed on individual freedom. 

As one of the leaders of the 1989 
revolution, and as a young journalist r m p tt-i 

covering the events as they took U J J-Uilldfe JT. XVlVdlld 



place, I share Masaryk's appreciation for the American 
legacy of freedom, especially freedom of speech and press. 1 
was therefore saddened when I arrived in the United 
States only to learn that this legacy is coming under attack 
on America's own university campuses. 

I have some experience with the university restrictions 
on free speech. For three years prior to the 1989 revolu- 
tion, I studied at the Faculty of Journalism at Charles 
University in Prague. This school was created in 1972 — 
four years after the Soviet invasion had reinstalled a neo- 
Stalinist government — out of the remnants of the former 
Faculty of Social Sciences and Journalism. Reformist 
professors were expelled, and new, uneducated, "politically 
responsible" cadres (loyal communist hardliners) took over. 
They weren't accountable to the Ministry of Education, but 
instead reported directly to the Central Committee of the 
Communist Party. In addition to "teaching," many worked 

as agents of the StB, the 

■MI^HI Czech secret police. 

The curriculum of the new 
Faculty of Journalism had 
no room for real philosophy, 
political science or litera- 
ture. Instead Marxist- 
Leninist ideology permeated 
almost all subjects, lectures 
and seminars. And of 



Do 

something 
good. 

Feel 

something 
real. 



course, there was no freedom of the press for the students 
of the Faculty. 

In early 1988, with changes sweeping through our big 
brother to the east, my friends and I launched a new 
magazine, PROTO (Because). In the journal, we tried to 
revive the spirit of academic freedom as we explained 
aspects of Perestroika and Glasnost — which the Czechoslo- 
vak communist leadership was 



Please see LETTER, p 14 



from now on in km, ony definition 
of o successfyl life mosl include serving 
others, fo find oof how you con help in 
pt wmripd I (800) 677-5515. 



O 



'OUNDATIO 



Points of Light 

li N 




Help! I want to 
sell my books 
back, but do I 
have to wait until 
the fall? 




No! The University 
Bookstore in the 
Student Union is 
buying back books 
all summer with no 
waiting involved. 
Stop in and also 
look at our summer 
clearance rack of 
shirts! 



University Bookstore 



I N 



THE 



T U D E N T 



UNION 



TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 7 



i ir r thim liii 



COUCH 

POTATO 

PAHTY 

IN THE ALLEY 
TUE$. JUNE 18 



7:00 pm. 
Predator II 

9:00 pm. 

Days of 
Thunder 

FREE PIZZA 
FREE COKES 

BE A COUCH 
POTATO! 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD 



Financial Aid Update 



Financial Aid 



■ If you are expecting a student loan for the Summer, 
you may begin picking up your checks now, even if you are not 
in your second session, as earlier instructed. 

■ There will not be any processing of Summer financial 
aid after the current session due to processing of Fall Semes- 
ter student aid. 

■ All students who intend on enrolling in the Fall need 
to make sure they have completed the Single File form ( Pell 
Grant papers). These papers need to be turned in to our office 
as soon as possible so that it will not delay the processing of 
your aid. 

■ For all the Shreveport Nursing students, you will soon 
be getting a counselor who will be there eight hours a day, five 
days a week. I know you will be very happy. 



Counselor for Shreveport Campus 



The Office of 
Student Financial 
Assistance hopes 
everyone is 
having a wonder- 
ful and enjoyable - 
summer. 
Throughout _ 
the summer I will 
keep you updated on all the 
latest news in the Financial 
Aid Office in a very informal, 
but serious way. Then into 

the Fall I will continue to inform you of all the news you need 
to keep current with Financial Aid. This will make it easier 
for you to remember when the dead- 
lines are and it will help us help you. 

There are just a few things that I j^y QfgQg PoleiHaXl 



Pell-Grant papers are due as soon 
as possible. And, you may pick up 
Student Loan checks now. 



■ Most important of all, 
our office wishes each of you 
the best of luck with your 
classes and hope you enjoy 
your summer. 

If you have any questions or 
need anything, stop by and 
speak to me or one of the 
Financial Aid secretaries in 
the Financial Aid office in 
Roy Hall or call us at 357- 
5961. 



want to remind you this summer: 



Craig Poleman's Financial Aid Update will be a regular 

column in the Current Sauce. Each 
week, the Sauce will keep you up to 
date with your Financial Aid. 




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8 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



From the Locker Room 



WLAF Over, 
Braves Close Gap 




ell, the first season of the World League of Ameri- 
can Football ( affectionately called the WeLAF) 
reached its climactic end as World Bowl I was held 
this weekend. The London Monarchs, who were 
favored to win the event, convincingly pounded the 
Barcelona Dragons by the score of 21-0. 

When I first heard of this NFL owner-sponsored 
league, I was excited. This meant that I could 
watch football for 8 1/2 months of the year. So I 
pledged allegiance to the Montreal Machines and I 
even considered purchasing some officially licensed WLAF 
apparel. 

After watching two weekend's worth of the sport, I realized 
just why these players were in the WLAF instead of the NFL. One 
particular aspect of the game stands out in my own mind: punt- 
ing. I have never seen more 'fake punts' in all of my couch potato 
experiences. There was even one instance where the kicker booted 
the ball for a loss of 2 yards. He kicked it over his head. 

The players gradually improved as 
did the games as well. As a matter of i p i . 

fact, at the time this article is printed, DV XvODCrl/ 



four WLAF players have been signed by the NFL. 

I was not alone in my discontent with the league as it was 
evident that the media was unhappy with the league's perfor- 
mance. After the first three weeks of play, I saw no highlights or 
features on the major sports news programs. The only news saw 
about the WLAF was at the end of a Sunday night sports news 
program in which they showed only the score of the World Bowl 
and no highlights. 

I hope that the WLAF can continue to remain in existence, 
because as the league ages and its players establish themselves, 
this league will become more competitive and provide much 
entertainment for sports enthusiasts such as myself. 

The Braves Closing The Gap 

I have often been harassed because of my love for the Atlanta 
Braves. But that was last year. This year, the Atlanta Braves are 
well above .500 and within reach of the division lead as they trail 
the Los Angeles Dodgers by mere percentage points. 

This turnaround is a combination of several forces including 
the pitching of Tom Glavine and Charlie Leibrandt well as that of 
2nd year starter Steve Avery. Not to be ignored is the equally 
important batting of veterans Jeff Treadway, Jeff Blauser, Ronnie 
Gant, and David Justice, as well as free agent acquisitions Otis 
Nixon, Terry Pendleton, and Sid Bream. 

The Braves' main weakness is its bullpen, which has been 
less than effective this season. A fellow Braves fan once revealed 
to me that, "if there ever was a team for which the phrase, 'it ain't 
over til it's over' held true, it was the Atlanta Braves". 

But all in all they're an exciting team to watch, and because 
they are televised by TBS, four to five days a week, it's easy to 
catch their games. 

Rangers Game Worth It 

I went to my first "real-life" major league baseball game at 
Arlington Stadium a few weeks ago. Roger Clemens and the 
Boston Red Sox were facing the formidable pitcher Kenny Rogers 
and his Texas Rangers. The Rangers shot down the 'Rocket' 13-4. 
I was impressed by their play and the stadium, with its natural 

grass and outfield bleachers. This open- 
TTtT_ c V. Q -jy-j a i r stadium remains the epitome of a 

VV dOllcilll true ballpark. Thanks, Rangers. 



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TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 9 



Features 




So WHEN 



IT'S HOT, but what can you do to beat the heat of the summer months at North- 
western? With the temperature rising into the 90s, most students are not to happy 
with outdoor activities because of the blazing heat. But some students still find 
ways to beat the heat. 1 The Northwestern State University Robert W. Wilson, Sr. 
Recreation Complex can offer any student a break from the heat. The Rec. 
Complex's unique "student 
country club" provides stu- 
dent a chance to get away 
from their summer studies 
to a haven of fun and relax- 
ation. *fl The Complex can 
offer a chance to relax on the 
Northwestern Hills golf 
course where students can 
tee up ever Tuesday for free 
with their valid student ID. 
A nine hole golf course will 
allow students the chance to 
relax with a quick game of 
golf. *1I "After three hours of 
class, there's nothing like a 
good game of golf to get your 
mind off of school," said 




10 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 





David Green, a senior from 
Lake Charles. 

When it is sizzling out, 
students can always relax- 
ing in the Northwestern 
Hills clubhouse. Students 
needing an alternative to 
outdoor activities can bask 
in the sun as they taa by 
the Olympic-sized pool or 
unwind with a couple of 
laps in the cool, peaceful 
water. 

Fishing is a favorite 
pastime of students, and 
Natchitoches and North- 
western have an abundance 
of "spots" to catch the big 
one. Chaplin's Lake on 
campus, Sibley Lake, Cane 
River Lake and Black's 
Lake offer the best in 
fishing for the student 
angler. 

If your idea of staying 
cool this summer has to do 
with water sports, then the 
Southeast Regional Rowing 
Championships are right up 
your alley. Saturday, June 
15, rowing teams from 15 
states will compete on a 
2,000 meter course set up 
on Sibley Lake. The North- 
western Rowing Club and 
the city of Natchitoches will 
hosts the championships to 



show off Sibley Lake which 
many consider to be one of 
the finest areas for rowing 
in the country. 

"The South Region is 
the largest area for rowing 
and it has the largest 
growth because there's so 
much water," said Gene 
Jeffords, Northwestern's 
rowing coach. 

Students can go down to 
the Mariner's Restaurant 
and relax in the sun as they 
watch some of the finest 
rowing in the country. 

Sibley Lake has more to 
offer than just rowing. 
Students can ski and fish on 
the lake. 

Air-conditioned comfort 
is the way many students 
plan to avoid simmering in 
the heat, Northwestern's 
Student Activities Board 
will host three free movies 
and free pizza this summer 
in the Alley, the second 
Tuesday of every session. 

The Northwestern 
Dinner Theatre in July will 
give students the chance to 
cool off after a long day's 
work. Students can enjoy 
this summer's production of 
"1940's Radio Hour" and a 
diner served before. 




Newsweek said "'1940's 
Radio Hour' has a real 
feeling for the pre-TV days 
when the ears were a 
receiving set for a whole 
world that opened inside 
your imagination like a 
flower of sound." 

If students are still 
trying to beat the heat in 
August, check out The 
Drum Corps International 
will be preforming in 
Turpin's Stadium. 

"Attending the DCI 
competitions for musicians 
is a near religious experi- 
ence," said Russell Harris, a 
former member of the 
Northwestern drum corps. 

With weeks of summer 
heat ahead, beating the 
heat will be an all-summer 
task for Northwestern 
students. Students have an 
a wide variety of events and 
activities from which to 
chose. 

From paddle-boating on 
the Cane River to playing 
softball, from attending the 
Diner Theatre in air- 
conditioned confront to 
playing golf in the scorching 
heat, students will be 
finding different things to 
do WHEN IT'S HOT. 



Many student beat the heat 
at Northwestern's Recreation 
Complex. Here, Ivan McDonald 
(left) tees off at the third hole 
on the Northwestern Hills golf 
course. 

The Southeast Regional 
Rowing Championships (top) 
will be held this weekend on 
Sibley Lake. Students trying to 
stay cool can sit by the banks 
and enjoy the water and sun. 



■ 



"wan?) ?*; 1 yt '■ 



TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 11 



Demon Sports 



All-Southland Conference Team Named 



Demon Baseball Dominates SLC List 



By Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

The Northwestern 
State Demon 
baseball team 
1 dominated the All- 
Southland Conference team 
and placed four on the All- 
Louisiana team, following their 
conference championship and 
first appearance in the NCAA 
Tournament. 

Leading the list of honor- 
ees were coach Jim Wells and 
outfielder Brian Carlin. Wells 
was named Coach of the Year 
in the SLC and the state. In 
his second year at the helm, 
Wells led his team to their first 
conference championship in 24 
years and their first tourna- 
ment ever. Carlin was named 



Player of the Year and New- 
comer of the Year in the 
Southland and first team All- 
State. A junior, Carlin led the 



first team were SLC Pitcher of 
the Year Barry Shepherd and 
senior shortstop Jay Williams. 
Both players were also named 
to the state second team. 
Shepherd, a junior, finished the 
season 8-5, 5-0 in conference 



Leading the list ofhonorees were coach 
Jim Wells and outfielder Brian Carlin. 
Wells named Coach of the Year, Carlin 
named Player of the Year 



Demons in nine offensive 
categories, including batting 
average, homed runs and 
RBI's. 

Other players on the SLC 



with a 2.87 ERA and three 
shutouts. Team co-captain 
Williams was second in batting 
average and had a .956 fielding 
average. 



Senior catcher James 
McCarthy, senior third 
baseman Deon Montgomery, 
and junior .outfielder Steve 
Smith were all named to the 
SLC second team. Smith, who 
also made honorable mention 
on the state squad, ranked 
third on the team in batting 
average. McCarthy threw out 
17 runners stealing second. 
Former Southland Conference 
first team pick Montgomery 
ranked fifth in batting average. 

Southland Conference 
honorable mention players 
were junior pitcher Skip 
Madden, junior outfielder 
Kevin Hartsburg and pitcher 
Matt Benson. Madden led the 
Demons in saves and 
strikeouts, and he is currently 
the Southland Conference 
career leader in saves. 



All-Southland Conference 
Team 

Coach of the Year 
Jim Wells 

Player of the Year 
Brian Carlin, outfielder 

Newcomer of the Year 
Brian Carlin 

Pitcher of the Year 
Barry Shepherd, pitcher 

First Team 
Brian Carlin 
Barry Shepherd 
Jay Williams, shortstop 

Second Team 
James McCarthy, catcher 
Steve Smith, outfielder 
Deon Montgomery, third base 

Honorable Mention 
Skip Madden, pitcher 
Kevin Hartsburg, outfielder 
Matt Benson, pitcher 




Lady Demons Set Five New 
Records At SLC Track Meet 



By Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

Lady Demon records fell all weekend at the 
Southland Conference outdoor track meet. A 
total of five records were broken as the Lady 
Demons finished eighth. The men recovered 
from a poor start to come in fourth. 

Senior Peggy Lewis 
successfully defended 



added to the records with a 2:20.99 preliminary 
time in the 800 meters. 

The men were led by a 1-2 finish in the 
triple jump. Sophomore LaMark Carter won the 
event with a jump of 52' 5 1/4", and Eric 
Lancelin took second with 50' 1 1/4". Lancelin 
also won the high jump with a jump of 6' 10 3/4". 

Carter also ran on the 



LaMark Carter jumped his way onto the AU-American Track 
and Field Team, June 20, when he jumped 52'4 3/4." 



her Southland Confer- 
ence shot put title with 
a school record 48' 5 1/4' 
throw on her last try. 
She had previously 
placed a disappointing 
fifth in the discus. 
Janice Miller placed 
second in the high jump 

with a record 5' 9" jump. Senior Kate Christmas 
placed ninth in the 10,000 meters with a school 
record time of 44:35.9. 

Regina Shaw also dropped a Lady Demon 
record, running a time of 55.89 in the prelimi- 
naries of the 400 meters. Freshman Judy Norris- 



Demon Records 
Peggy Lewis threw the shot 48 feet 5 1/4 inches 
Janice Miller jumped 5' 9" in the high jump. 
Regina Shaw ran a 400-meter dash in 55.89. 
Judy Norris ran a 800-meter dash in 2:20.99. 
Kate Christmas ran the 10,000-meter in 44:35.9 



second place 4x100 
meter relay team. The 
4x400 meter relay team 
also came in second. 

Other big contribu- 
tions came from Trevor 
Aldridge and Clarence 
Walters. Aldridge came 
in a surprise third in 
the javelin with a throw of 219' 6". Walters 
placed third in the 400 meters at 47.08. 

Their performances at the SLC meet won 
Eric Lancelin, LaMark Carter, Peggy Lewis, 
Janice Miller and the 4x100 meter relay team 
spots on All-SLC Track team. Lancelin was 
honored in the high jump and the triple jump 
" - ■ " * . " 



Carter Jumps His Way to Ail-American Honor 



By Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

Sophomore triple jumper 
LaMark Carter is Northwest- 
ern State University's 14th 
track and field Ail-American in 
the last five years, following an 
eighth place finish at the 1991 
NCAA Outdoor Track and 
Field Championships in 
Eugene, Wash., 

Carter won his chance to 
go to the national event with a 



conference- winning jump of 52' 
5 1/4" at the Southland 
Conference meet on May 20. 
That jump also won him a 
place on the All-Southland 
Conference track team. 

Carter entered the na- 
tional meet ranked last in the 
field of sixteen. In the qualify- 
ing round, he set a personal 
record of 52' 8 3/4" to seed 
himself seventh of the twelve 
qualifiers. He then advanced 



to final round on June 2, and 
placed eighth with a jump of 
52' 4 3/4". He finished the 
meet as the second-ranked 
American born jumper in the 
NCAA. 

At Captain Shreve High 
School in Shreveport, Carter 
was a nationally-ranked 
jumper and set a state record of 
51' 1 1/2". 

This was Carter's first 
NCAA appearance. 



1991 Football Schedule Released 

The 1991 Demon Football Schedule was released 
this week by the Southland Conference. 

The Demons will play their first three games 
away, traveling to Arkansas State, Nevada Reno and 
Texas-El Paso. 

The Demons will :ve a lot of traveling to do. 
Their last four games -j ill be road-trips when they 
play Southwest Texas, Sam Houston, Nicholls State 
and Stephen F. Austin. 

- The Demons will play their four home game 
September 28, October 12, 19 and 26. 



12 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



81 iUfll ,11 £jOJJI> ^U.Iiil-1'ijl.l.UWjii.'it.V; 



I IV "tttitti 



Demon Sports 



Rube Named Northwestern's First All- American 



McCalister Third Time Coach of the Year 



By Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

Rhonda Rube's third 
| team All-American 

performance led nine 
) Lady Demon Softball 



players on the All-Southland 
Conference team and eight 
players named to the All- 
Louisiana team, following their 
first ever Southland Confer- 
ence championship. 

Junior catcher Rube is 
Northwestern's first All- 
American softball player. She 
was also named Southland 
Conference Player of the Year 
and Louisiana Co-Player of the 



Year. She batted .341 with 14 
doubles and 5 home runs, and 
set school records with 44 RBI's 
and 60 hits. She now has 51 
career doubles and, with 14 
more, can set a new NCAA 
record. She also threw out 19 
runners trying to steal and 
seven other base runners. 

Lady Demon coach Rickey 
McCalister won SLC Coach of 
the Year for an unprecedented 
third strait year, and also 
made Louisiana coach of the 
Year. McCalister guided his 
squad to a third strait record 
number of wins in a 44-18-1 
season. 



Rube was joined on the 
SLC first team by senior 
shortstop Sonja Olsen - who 
made the team for he fourth 
year - and sophomore out- 
fielder Amy Grisham. Grisham 
also made honorable mention 
on the state team. All-Louisi- 
ana first team members were 
sophomore second baseman 
Ashley Grisham, sophomore 
pitcher Claudia Percle and 
junior pitcher Nancy Percle. 
Both Percle sisters were second 
team All-SLC, and Ashley 
Grisham received honorable 
mention on the conference 
team. 

Senior first baseman Missy 
Pereira was named second 
team SLC and honorable 



mention in the state. Junior 
outfielder Rustie Stevens 
received honorable mention on 
both squads. Junior pitcher 
JemiiLaHaye made honorable 
mention in the state, and 
senior outfielder Amy Thibault 
made honorable mention in the 
conference. 

Amy Grisham batted .276 
with 19 stolen bases and 30 
walks. She is the Northwest- 
ern career leader in walks. 
Nancy Percle recorded her 
second strait 20-win season. 
Her sister Claudia batted .265 
while pitching to a record of 15- 
8 with team-leading 66 
strikeouts. Pereira batted .288 
and led the team with 16 
sacrifice bunts. 




All-Southland Conference Team 

Coach of the Year 
Rickey McCalister 

Player of the Year 
Rhonda Rube, catcher 

First Team 
Rhonda Rube 
Sonja Olsen, shortstop 
Amy Grisham, outfielder 

Second Team 
Claudia Percle, pitcher 
• - Nancy Percle, pitcher 
Missy Pereira, first base 

Honorable Mention 
Ashley Grisham, second base 
Amy Thibault, outfielder 
Rustie Stevens, outfielder 



Sports in Brief 



All-Academic Squad 

Lady Demon softball 
pitcher Jemi LaHaye and 
tennis star Karen Patel were 
named to the GTE Academic 
All-District VI team by the 
College Sports Information 
Directors of America. The two 
led seventeen Northwestern 
athletes named to the 
Southland Conference Spring 
Academic Honor Roll. 

LaHaye, a junior from 
Belle Chase, kept a 3.23 GPA 
in English Education while 
compiling a 9-2 record with 2 
saves for the Lady Demons. 
Patel, a Winchester, England 
native, graduated summa cum 
laude in May with a 3.92 GPA 



in Business Administration. 
She was named to the district 
at-large team. 

Other athletes named by 
the SLC were: Baseball - Brian 
Carlin, Matt Benson; Softball - 
Amy Grisham, Nicole Kilgore; 
Golf - Dean Sterling; Tennis - 
Gloria Doll, Jane Paterson, Siw 
Johnson, Vicky Sims; Track - 
Janice Miller, Karen Allemand, 
Kate Christmas, Mark Troxler, 
Paul Neyman, and Sonja 
Williamson. 

NSU to host regional regatta 

Northwestern's Rowing 
! Club and the City of Natchi- 
i toches will host the annual 
' Southeast Regional Rowing 



Championships Saturday, June 
15 on Sibley Lake. 

Rowing teams from 15 
states will participate in 
competition, putting approxi- 
mately 200 boats on the lake. 
Sibley Lake will be closed to all 
skiing and unauthorized boat 
traffic Saturday. 

Competition will start at 8 
a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. 

Field house wing dedicated 
to past coach 

Northwestern renamed 
one wing of the Athletic 
Fieldhouse The George 
Doherty Wing" Saturday in 
honor the the past Demon 
football coach. Doherty, who 



died in 1987, spent 11 years at | 
Northwestern. He started as 
an assistant coach in 1967, and 
was named head coach in 1972. | 
He led the Demons to the Gulf | 
South Conference champion- j 
ship that year, and stepped 
down in 1974 to concentrate on j 
being athletic director. 

Northwestern loses in NCAA { 
South Regional 

After a record-setting 
season, the Northwestern 
baseball team took thier 
Southland Conference title to 
the NCAA South Regional and 
promptly lost. 

The Demons lost thier first 
game to the eventual NCAA 



champions LSU 13-2. The 
Demons had been worried about 
the break affecting their hitting, 
but it was poor defense to the 
tune of six errors that cost the 
Demons the game. A two-out 
error in the second allowed five 
LSU runs, and the Demns were 
never able to recover. 

In the second game of the 
regionals, a two-out error in the 
fifth allowed USL to build a 8-0 
lead. The Demons came back to 
with 10-7 behind two Larry 
Ross home runs and another 
round tripper by Mitch 
Deshotels, but couldn't recover. 

The Demons finished the 
season with a record of 40-21 on 
a four-game losing streak. 



Recruiting Report 



Men's Basketball 

So far, Northwestern has 
signed five new members to the 
men's basketball team. Point 
guard Mark Dillon will travel 
from Tolsia High in Fort Gay, 
West Virginia to join the 
Demon squad, the 6-2, 190- 
pounder averaged 22 points 
and 8 assists per game to lead 
his school to the state 
quarterfinals and gain All- 
State berth. 

Within the state, All- 
Staters Mike Speed of Tioga, 
Don Venzant of Saline, Richard 
Sanders of Pineville, and 
Kenny McMillon of Stanley will 
join the team. Speed, the 
District 4-AAA MVP, averaged 
28 points and 10 rebounds, 
shooting 79 percent from the 
free throw line and 54 percent 
from three-point range to lead 
his team to the playoffs. 
Venzant, a 5-11 point guard, 



averaged 22 points, 6 rebounds 
and 6 assists to lead Saline to 
their second strait Class C 
state title. 

Women's Basketball 

Shooting guard Kim Hill of 
Kilgore Junior College will join 
guards Angela Lucius from 
Florien and Angela Simpson 
from Huntington High in 
Shreveport as the newcomers 
to the Lady Demon squad next 
year. 

Hill, originally from 
Waskom High School, averaged 
19 points, 6 rebounds and 5 
steals to help Kilgore to a 
fourth place finish in the 
National Junior College 
Athletic Association champion- 
ships. She had started on the 
previous year's championship 
team at Kilgore, which pro- 
duced Northwestern standouts 
Pam Hudson and Yolanda 



Brown. 

Lucius was signed from 
Florien during the season. She 
had scored 1,231 and given 210 
assists in her first three 
seasons by the signing date, 
had played on the 1989 state 
championship team and the 
1990 runner-up squad, and 
been an All-Stater both years. 

Track, Cross Country 

Four top high school 
distance runners have signed 
with the Demon track team , 
along with two sprinters from 
Louisiana. Joining Coach 
Johnson's men's squad are 
Mike Boyd and Robbie Bryer of 
McCullough High and Ray 
Martinez of MacArthur High, 
both in Houston. Bryer and 
Martinez both ran at their 
regional championship meet, 
and are expected to also run 
cross-country. Boyd runs 400 



and 800 meters. 

Signing with Chris 
Maggio's women's team are 
Carla Davison of McCullough 
High, Angela Jeter of 
Haughton and Katina Smith of 
Lake Charles. Davison runs 
400 and 800 meters, and ran 
with her school's 1990 state 
runner-up track team and 1989 
state champion cross country 
team. Jeter won the Louisiana 
Class AAA 100 and 200 meter 
races three years running, and 
holds the record in both. She 
also has been an All-State pick 
for two years. 

Volleyball, Softball 

Six young women have 
signed to Rickey McCalister's 
two Lady Demon squads for 
this year. Susan Baxter of 
Natchitoches Central, Jerri 
Dusenbery of Houma, Karen 
Hill of Mt. Pleasant, Texas, 



and Shera Dowel 1 of Round 
Rock, Texas will all join the 
volleyball team. Jennifer 
Painter of Alexandria will play 
softbJU, and Carrie Shirley of 
LaCtfe&'nta, California has 
signSpba to-play both sports. 

Baxter played basketball 
at Natchitoches, and was twice 
All-District. At 6-1, her size is 
expected to greatly contribute. 
Dowell is a 5-9 outside hitter. 
Dusenberry, a 5-5 setter, led 
her team to two state champi- 
onships and made All-Region 
three years. Hill, at 5-10, was 
All-District twice. 

Painter was a four time 
All-District pitcher at Alexan- 
dria Senior High, and is 
expected to play outfield for 
coach McCalister. Shirley, a 
shortstop and outside hitter, 
ws named to the All-League 
squad three times in each 
sport. 



TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 13 



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14 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Letter: warning about 
politically correct beliefs 



■ Continued from page 7 

fighting hard to resist. Although we were 
allowed relative freedom to write about 
culture, overall we were censored heavily 
by the authorities. 

In November. 1989, the students of 
Czechoslovakia were finally given the 
chance to speak freely. Led by twenty- 
year-old Paval Zacek, students from the 
Faculty started a new, nationally- 
distributed biweekly, Studentske Listy 
(Students' Paper). Its aim was to provide 
a voice for the generation least compro- 
mised by the previous regime, serving 
readers of all ages with intelligent 
analysis of political issues. 

By early 1990, Studentske Listy 
had a circulation of 150,000, a huge 
number in a country of 15 million people. 
During its first 18 months the paper 
improved substantially as its editors and 
writers gained experience. The names of 
columnists and reporters like Dan Hruby, 
Radko Kubicko, Bohumil Pecinka and 
Klara Pospisilova are now nationally 
known. Top aides to President Vaclav 
Havel readily gave our journal exclusive 
interviews, helping the paper gain a real 
following in political and intellectual 
circles. 

But generational conflicts soon 
appeared. Unlike the vast majority of 
the present Czechoslovak establishment, 
those who came of age during the reform 
communism of the 1960s, the leaders of 
our generation are solidly committed to 
free-market reforms and western-style 
democracy. After the Utopian experi- 
ments of the last 40 years, we have little 
patience for democratic socialism or the 
so-called "Third Way" between capitalism 



and communism. The editors of 
Studentske Listy clearly understand that 
the best government governs least and 
gives citizens their natural rights to 
pursue happiness. 

The clarity with which we express 
these opinions frightens many of those 
who still favor 1968-style "socialism with 
a human face." Some of our elders have 
labeled our non-conformist opinions 
"unprofessional." and have called our 
investigative reporting "sensationalistic." 
But Studentske Listy has and will 
continue to tell the truth as we see it. 

With these events fresh in my 
mind, I have been closely following the 
debates about free speech at American 
colleges and universities — and especially 
the recent disputes over "political 
correctness." I see disturbing parallels 
between "politically correct" professors in 
America and the Czechoslovakian 
establishment that came of age in the 
1960s. I deeply hope that American 
students will never hesitate to challenge 
the stale orthodoxies of their elders, and 
that absolute freedom of speech prevails 
on this country's campuses. 

Like most students in Central 
Europe, I have come to believe it is 
essential that every democratic nation be 
made aware of the authentic opinions of 
its younger generation. May the two- 
century-old American heritage of freedom 
continue, and may no one seek to sup- 
press that freedom. 



Thomas Klvana is a former student at Charles 
University in Prague and a free-lance journal- 
ist. He is currently traveling through America 
to discuss the revolution in Czechoslovakia, 
and to strengthen Czech-American relations. 



1991 NORTHWESTERN STATE 
DEMON FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



Sept 7 


Away 


Arkansas State 


Oct 19 


Home 


McNeese State * 


Sept 14 


Away 


Nevada-Reno 


Oct 26 


Home 


Northeast La. * 


Sept 21 


Away 


Texas-El Paso 


Nov 2 


Away 


Southwest Texas * 


Sept 28 


Home 


East Texas State 


Nov 9 


Away 


Sam Houston State ' 


Oct 5 


Open 


Nov 16 


Away 


Nicholls State * 


Oct 12 


Home 


North Texas State * 


Nov 23 


Away 


Stepen F. Austin* 



* denotes Southland Conference game 



Support your Northwestern Demon 



s 



C D C E SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR 
rnCC STUDENTS WHO NEED 

MONEY FOR COLLEGE 



CALL 
ANYTIME 



1-800-937-1797 



part one in a series 



Folk Festival 
Salutes Music of 
North Louisiana 



the NSU Folklife Center than any we've done 
before," said Dr. Don Hatley, director of the NSU 
Folk Life Center and the Natchitoches-Northwest- 
ern Folk Festival. "The Folk Life Center is here to 
identify, document and present various elements of 
Louisiana's rich folk culture and this is one way we 
fulfill that purpose." 

Castille Returns 

Though the festival this July will feature the 
music of North Louisiana, no Folk Festival would 



C7 3 



coumtrv 3 



Louisiana is home to 
many different cultures and 
special ways of life beyond the 
boundaries of Acadiana or 
New Orleans. The 12th 
annual Natchitoches-North- 
western Folk Festival to be 
held on July 19-21 in the 
university's Prather Coliseum 
will feature the music of North Louisiana, 
along with crafts, food and dance. The festival 
will show visitors a sample of the great cultural 
diversity present in North Louisiana. 

Each year the Louisiana Folklife Center at 
Northwestern State University presents the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Folk Festival in an 
effort to promote an understanding of all people of 
our state. 

Music is an important part of life in North 
Louisiana and the Louisiana Folk Life Center wiD 
present of the most varied musical shows ever 
assembled in North Louisiana. 



Bluegrass Festival 

As part of the tribute to North Louisi- 
ana music, the Chaplin's Lake Bluegrass 
Festival is being inaugurated this year in 
conjunction with the Folk Festival. Those 
scheduled to preform include the Watkins 
Family, Don Wiley, Fiddlin' John Johnson, 
Buzz Salard and the Twin City Ramblers. 

All day Saturday and Sunday, on the 
banks of beautiful Chaplin's Lake, adjacent 
to Prather Coliseum, many bluegrass 
groups will play. Audience participation is 
welcome and 'jammers" are encouraged to 
bring their instruments and play.. 

The festival also will pay tribute to 
blues, Ark-La-Tex country music, white and 
black gospel in North Louisiana and the 
fiddling tradition of North Louisiana. 

"This festival examines the roots of 
north Louisiana's traditional music. It 
comes closer to trying to fulfill the aims of 



"This festival examines the roots of north 
Louisiana's traditional music. It comes closer 
to trying to fulfill the aims of the NSU 
Folklife Center than any we've done before. " 



be complete without a taste of Cajun music. 
Hadley Castille, a popular musician at previous 
Folk Festivals, returns to the festival for the first 
time since 1987. 

The Folk Festival is divided into four segments, 
a Friday night concert, a Saturday daytime show, a 
Saturday night show, and a Sunday daytime show. 

Preston Frank and the Zydeco Family Band 
and Alexandria musician Ruble Wright and his 
Wright Beats will preform during the opening show 
Friday night. Wright is a 30-year veteran of house 
dances, dance halls and live radio along with 




The 12th annual Folklife Festival will pay tribute to the music of 
North Louisiana. 



festivals in north and central Louisiana 

Castille will headline the Saturday night show 

Craftsmen Show Work 

As usual, the Folk Festival will snowcase manv 
native Louisiana craftsmen. The festival has 
become known as a place to visit with the mo , 
skilled of Louisiana folk artist in an intimate 
noncommercial setting out of the summer heat 
The Natchitoches festival specifically contracts 
with crafts people to answer questions and teach 

their crafts to visitors. 

Following the music theme of the festival, 
there will be luthiers demonstrating the fine 

art of guitar construction, plus a 100 fiddle 

display from the collection of Natchitoches 
resident Billy Wester. Another luthier, Ron 
Richardson of Robeline, has been making 
guitars for seven years. Jimmy Edwards of 
Greenwell Springs, who has been making 
guitars for four years, will be at the festival. 
Richardson and Edwards works will be 
displayed. 

The crafts area will be divided into different 
categories: instrument making, basketry, wood 
working skills, sewing/textile crafts, hunting/ 
fishing skills, blacksmithing and pottery. 

Along with the variety of crafts, Louisiana 
cooks will prepare Bayou State cuisine such as 
Natchitoches meatpies, neckbones and rice, sweet 
potato pies, gumbos, etouffes, Creoles and 
jambalyas. 

Something for Children 

A children's festival is also planned in front of 
the coliseum. Kid Fest '91, sponsored by 
the Natchitoches Parish Hospital, will give 
children something to do at the festival. A 
10x10 model train, courtesy of the Kansas 
City Southern Lines, will be on hand for 
children to operate. Also, the Natchitoches 
Fish Hatchery will bring live fish to be 
featured in a fish petting pond, and the 
Natchitoches Fire Department will have a 
fire engine on display. 

During its 12-year history, the festival 
has twice been selected as a Top 20 event in 
the Southeastern United States by the 
Southeast Tourism Society. 

The quality of the festival has also been 
recognized by the National Endowmems for 
the Arts which has awarded numerou 
grants to the festival. 

For more information about the Natchi- 
toches-Northwestern Folk Festival contact 
the Louisiana Folklife Festival at 357-4332. 



Wednesday 

THE WIZARD 
Noon 

SCOTT BROOKS 
3:00 

BRIGETTE 
6:00 

THE KID 
9:00 



Thursday 
CULTURE SHOCK 

ALTERNATIVE ROCK 

NOON 

J-LUV 

SOUL SHOW 
3:00 

ALEX MORGAN 

SOUL SHOW 
6:00 

PAUL PICKERING 
9:00 

NJ 



Friday 

THE WILD THING 
Noon 

THE DESPERADO 
3:00 

THE BLADE 
METAL SHOW 

WITH TROOPER AND GYPSY 
6:00 

DOC ROCK 
METAL SHOW 
9:00 



Saturday 

WAYNE SELF 
ALTERNATIVE ROCK 
NOON 

e MOODY RADIO 
WITH CAROL 
3:00 

THE JOKER 
6:00 

RANDY PRICE 
9:00 



w 



TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 15 



BRUCE WILLIS 
HUDSON HAWK 

a Tri Star Picture 



Director 
Michael Lehmann 
Producer 
Joel Silver 
Screenplay 
Steven E. de Souza and 
Daniel Waters 
Story 

Bruce Willis and Robert Kraft 
Co-Producer 
Michael Dry hurst 
Executive Producr 
Roobert Kraft 
Director of Photography 
Dante Spinotti, A.I.C. 

Production Designer 
Jack DeGovia 



What we liked: 

■ The locations were excel- 
lent. Filmed on location in 
Rome, New York, Budapest, 
London and Hollywood. 

■ The photography was very 
well done 

■ Bruce Willis was at his 
best in the role of Hudson 
Hawk. 

■ Danny Aiello was inspir- 
ing. Pairing him with Willis 
was the best thing Lehmann 
did. 



What we didn't like: 

■ The plot. Its starts out 
believable, but goes down hill 
after that. 

■ Sandra Bernhard 

■ The poor one-liners 

"Hudson Hawk" is playing at the 
Parkway Cinema. It is rated R for 
violence and language. 







Movie Review 



Don't Catch 
The Hawk 




Okay. The sleeper 
hit of the sum- 
mer, right? 
Wrong! Interest- 
ingly enough 
after the last few 
movies that 
Bruce Willis has 
been in you'd 
think he would want to do 
something a little more 
serious. Wrong, again. 

"Hudson Hawk" is the Bruce Willis, Robert Kraft (the 
movie's producer) pet production. The title comes from the 
term used to describe a cold wind; "the hawk" and 
"Hudson" is derived from the Hudson River from whence 
the cold wind blows off of. Nice title. 

Hudson Hawk (Bruce Willis) is the world's greatest 
cat burglar and he just finished a 10-years prison stint. All 
he wants is to clean up his act and go into the bar business. 
Instead, a very sadomasochist Minerva Mayflower (Sandra 
Bernhard) and her sadistic husband Darwin (Richard E. 
Grant) have other plans for the reformed cat burglar. The 
plot: steal three De Vinci pieces of art and deliver it or 
Hudson's best friend Tommy "Five- 
Tone" Messina (Danny Aiello) will 
be a victim of an untimely death. 
Great plot? Well, the three 



pieces of art contain parts of a crystal that De Vinci 
used to turn lead into gold. Weird plot. On top of 
that, Hudson falls in love with, a nun. Anna Baragli 
(Andie MacDowell) is the semi-automatic pistol 
packing nun. She's an undercover agent for the 
Vatican. What else could you ask for in a movie? 
What else could you ask for in a nun? 
How about James Coburn playing a twisted CIA 
agent who is blackmailing Hudson into stealing the parts 
to the De Vinci machine or Hudson will be making license 
plates once more. Whew! 

The movie is a bit complicated and at some parts 
even" a little twisted. It did force a few chuckles from me 

and from the audience. This 
was induced by the sight- 
gags and corny jokes that 
ran amuck in this movie. 
Probably one of the funniest 
is a retrospective look in the 
opening 10 minutes of De 
Vinci painting "Mona Lisa". 
The reason for the grim look 
an Mona's face, she had bad 
teeth. 

The action was 
nominal but (as the current 
trend is) the deaths of many 
people in the play were 
weird and usually tacked 
with another one of those 
corny lines; such as "catch you later" when a bad guy falls 
off a building. Willis and Robert Kraft, the writers, could 
have done a better job at the one-liners. 

The movie used many special effects and made the 
cat burglar role very believable. Willis even did his own 
stunts, but it is hard to believe that the only people guard- 
ing the Vatican are two plump rent-a-cops with sinus 
problems. 

Willis is at his best , the locations — Rome, New York, 
Budapest, London, Hollywood — are exciting, Danny Aiello 
is excellent teamed up with Willis, the photography is well 
done. But, the $51 million spent on this movie were 

probably spent more on travel and 
, T j special effects than plot develop- 

Dy Leonard WllliamS ment. Do yourself a favor, don't 

catch the Hawk. 




Mysterious CIA agent George Kaplan (James Coburn, left) and his 
"candy bar" operatives exercise a little gentle persuasion with 
Hudson Hawk (Brice Willis, center). 



the ^ 

cinema 




Mon., Wed., Fri. 7 & 9 
Tues., Thurs., Sat., Sun., 2, 4, 7, 9 

,CitV 

Suckers 



BILLY 
CRYSTAL 

DANIEL 
STERN 

BRUNO 
KIRBY 



Mon., Wed., Fri. 7:15 & 9:15 
Tues., Thurs., Sal., Sun. 2:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:15 



BILL 
MURRAY 



RICHARD 
DREYFUSS 

TOUCHSTONE PICTURES 



1011 KeyserAve. 
352-5109 



Mon., Wed., Fri. 7 & 9 
Tues., Thurs., Sal., Sun. 2, 4, 7, 9 

Sally Mn Robert My ami Wkoopi 

FIELD KLINE D0WNEi> MORIAKTY GOLDBERG 



A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 




Mon . Wed.. BRUCE 



WILLIS 

Tues., Thurs., <t«rru 
Sat., Sun. UA 1 
2:15! 415. THE HAWK 

7:15, 9:15 m 

I ,i A TRI-STAfl RELEASE. 



HUDSON 
HAWK 



Ivor Toe Sarnie, "I f Natchitoches & Northwestern 



// 



16 June 11, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



MID-YEAR SAVINGS 

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Summer Hours: 

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Sat 9am-5pm 

Sun Noon-4pm 



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the copy center 
510 College 

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FOUR YEARS OF COLLEGE 
DOWN THE TUBES. 





If you think the tests in col- 
lege are tough, wait until your 
first job interview. Last year, 
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ing drug tests. Failing the test how smart can you be. 



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TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 17 



Editoral Page 



TheSummerSauce 



EDITORIAL 



Teachers Deserve 
12 Percent Pay Raise 

The Louisiana Legislature passed and the governor 
signed an appropriations bill for 1990-91 that stated, "a 
four percent salary increase as a cost-of-living adjust- 
ment with the remainder of this appropriation to be 
applied toward the goal of raising the salaries of 
[university faculty] , on the average of each rank, to the 
corresponding SREB salary averages within three 
years." 

Now, the Legislature could destroy education by 

w^'a pVblffi^B to^rTe^fifu^ui - tSurvEfsiiiJEo" wHl^ugiiuut 8 
the state. It was a written, enacted law — something 
you just don't forget about. Now the Legislature is 
backing down. 

With problems in education today, it would be 
devastating to cut the pay raise of faculty. Louisiana is 
not known for having the best education system. The 
state cannot recruit outstanding scholars to teach at 
the university level with such low pay, thus hurting the 
students. 

It won't just hurt students and educators. It will 
ruin the state's image as a state who's education 
program is on the up-swing. U.S. News and World 
Report featured a Shreveport high school in a recent 
article about education. Other national publications 
have noted the program to raise faculty salaries and 
the progress of the state. Now, the turn around by the 
Legislature will ruin the credibility of the state and 
damage the images of our universities. 

In a resolution passed by the Board of Regents on 
May 23, Chairman George W. Hardy, III said, " This is 
a serious matter of public faith, and everyone who 
touched this deal knew and understood it. There can 
have been no doubt as to the intent of this program. 
No utterances to the contrary are credible to me" 

This was a promise Louisiana made to the faculty. 
We must keep it — if not for our educators then for our 
students. 



The Cu 
semester k 
ana. It isr 
is financed 



] St>ffG foil 



Lo 

TTke Big Q ues "H orv "" 




Readers' Forum 



Reach Out And Touch 
Someone - Like The Sauce 



The Current Sauce would like to 
introduce the new Readers' Forum, which is 
simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers 
e way for people to ask questions, expres* 
concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this 
feature, but we are also aware that thi» ;# : ~ 
feature couid be misused for the sole 
purpoS* of causing embarrassment and nam 



individual will edit the calls. 

We will evaluate the calls for potential to 
inspire improvement in any given area and 
then make a decision whether or not to publish 
it. Even if the call is not published, we may 
choose to do an independent followup on the 

T» leave a messajgie, just call pur number 
at 357-5456 betweeit p.m. and 1G p-m. oa 
weekdays and ieave,vpur name, Classification, 

major .-and m sssa gjM^«BHMBBtn«}Hffi''£fr< 



Opinion Page 



Current Quotes 



Question: How do you feel about the four three- week sessions for summer school? 







Vernessa Fields 

Music Education 
Bossier City 
Senior 

I think its neat. I like it. I 
can deal with classes for 
three hours every day. I 
kinda wish they'd use this 
during the regular school 
year. 



Monica Brosset 

Social Work 

Ft. Myers, Florida 

Senior 

I like the three hour 
classes, but I don't like 
the limited number of 
people that attend. 
There's nothing to do. 



Patrick Watts 

Anthropology 
Baton Rouge 
Senior 

The rigorous schedule 
hasn't allowed time for 
enough drinking. 



Ed Robarge 

Radiology Technology 

Lafayette 

Junior 

You have to be really 
serious in summer 
school, if you get behind 
you'll never catch up. 




Kathryn Allen 

Mathematics 
Natchitoches 
Junior 

I think that the three 
week sessions are harder 
on the students, because 
you can only absorb so 
much material at one 
time. 



Sauce Poll 



A New Voice For Students 



The Sauce Poll will be a biweekly 
forum to gauge the intensity of 
students feelings on the issues facing 
Northwestern today. 

Every other week we we will ask 
you to vote on an issue. Then in the 
following paper we will publish the 
results of the poll. 

If students feel strongly on certain 
issues, the Current Sauce will look 
into the matter through articles 
published that week or the weeks to 



follow. 

The poll will be conducted each 
weekday. A staff member will 
answer the phone and record your 
vote of "Yes" or "No." You will not 
have to leave your name. 

The number to call is 357-5456 
Monday thru Friday between 12 p.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

This is your forum. By voting, 
you give us the chance to better serve 
you. 



The Sauce Poll 



A bi-weekly forum on issues that affect Northwestern State University 

DO YOU APPROVE OF THE 4-3 WEEK 
SESSIONS FOR SUMMER SCHOOL? 



YES 




NO 



•D 

The Sauce Poll is not scientific but does serine as an informal gauge of the intensity of feelings on an issue 



Universities around the 
nation are trying to ban 
smoking in public 
buildings. 



Will Northwestern Become 



SMOKE 
FR 





June 25 in 



TheSummerSauce 





TheSummerSauce June 11, 1991 19 

iiijJiJUiiJHllJlliUJliiliiliii!iUHilitNiHBi 
iiilHOiHUiulUilUHiu^niiUiMJlj^l'''^ 4 ' 



Tired cf University food ? 

NSa STUDENTS! 

THE GREATEST MEAL PLAN YET! 
WHERE ELSE BUT? 

Leon's 

Old Fashioned Hamburgers 
Here's how it works! 

GO-DEMON COUPON BOOKS 

BUY SlOO BOOK, GET $125 WORTH OF COUPONS 
BUY $200 BOOK, GET $250 WORTH OF COUPONS 
BUY $500 BOOK, GET $625 WORTH OF COUPONS! 



What A Deal!!! Coupons 
are in $5 denominations and 
you get cash back on amounts 
less than $5 (minimum 
purchase $3). Example: Buy 
one of Leon's famous Burger 

Baskets with fries, Coke 
included, for $2.89 plus tax 
and you get the difference 
back in cash. Simple, That's it! 

The ideal gift from parents, 
grandparents, relatives and 

friends for the student. WHY? 
Because: 

1. It can be a complete semester meal 
plan in itself. 

2. The best food in town at the best 
prices, PLUS 25% in free food 
coupons. 

3. Cash back on unused amount of 
coupon-purchase for other non-food 
needs. 




Order Form 

Please send me 

Coupon book of $ 

Total $_ 



By Mail 

Go-Demon 

_ denomination 



Check, Money Order enclosed for 
total amount $100, $250, $500. 

Book includes free food coupons. 
Books are numbered in case of 
loss of I.D. 



BREAKFAST 
Large Breakfast 

(Eggs, Bacon and Sausage or Toast) 
Sausage Biscuit 
Grilled Honey Bun 
Pancakes (2) 

(With choice of Bacon or Sausage) 


3.25 

.99 
.60 
2.10 




LUNCH 


Reg. 


Lrg. 


Dbl. 


Ipi 


Hamburger 


1.59 


1.79 


2.55 


3.75 


Cheeseburger 


1.69 


1.99 


2.75 


3.95 


Bacon C/Burger 


235 


2.65 


2.85 


415 


Fish Sandwich 


1.35 




2.10 




BBQ (Chipped Beef) 


1.80 








B.L.T. 


1.75 








Homemade Meat Pies 


U5 








Hot Dog 


.95 








Com Dog 


1.00 








Hot Link 


.95 








Chili Dog 


1.25 








Chicken Cheese Sand 


1.95 








Roast Beef 


2.25 








Taco Salad 


3.49 








Ham-N-Cheese 


2.25 








Grilled Chicken Sand. 


155 








Ribeye Sandwich 


355 








Chef Salad 


315 








Steak Sandwich 


1.85 








Chicken Sandwich 


ISO 








Club Sandwich 


2.95 








Po Boy/ Ham or Beef 


2.50 








SIDE ORDERS 




Key. 


Lrg. 




French Fries 




.70 


.95 




Cajun Fries 




1.10 


115 




Onion Rings 




115 






Curly Q's 




.95 






TatorTots 




.85 


1.10 




Hot Gumbo 




1.75 






Hot Chili 




1.75 




4 


Hot Boudin 




1.25 






FritoPies 




1.50 






Chili Fries 




1.75 






Chips 




.50 






Nachos 




.99 






Baked Pot 




1.10 






Stuffed Pot 




1.85 







MEAL DEAfjS, Served with Choice of Salad. Fries or Baked Potato 



Kid's Meal 1.99 

(Hamburger, fines, & Drink) 

Ribeye Dinner 4.95 

Meat Pie Dinner (2) 3 jrj 

Chicken Strip Dinner (3) 3.50 

Catfish Dinner (2) 5.95 

(Cole Slaw, Hush Puppies, & Fries) 

Burger Basket 3.50 

Shrimp Basket 3.95 

Steak Finger Basket (4) 3 .50 

Pork Chop Dinner (2) 3.95 



BEVERAGES 

Tea, Coke, Diet Coke, Orange, 
Dr. Pepper 

Milk 

Hot Coffee 
Hot Cocoa 
MiDcShakes 
Fresh Lemonade 
Ice 

Sno Cones 



SiDL Reg. Lg. 

.70 .85 1.00 



1.00 

15 

.45 

.95 ISO 

.85 1.00 

.99 



.70 



.75 



.85 1.00 



DESSERTS 
Cheese Cake(l slice) 
Funnel Cake 
Mora's Cinnamon Roll 



1.10 
1.50 
1.50 



Dinners Served Every Friday 

Delivery! 



fPrlle Buster!] 

/Lg HB, FF and 16oz Drink/ 
2.89 + tax 



904 College Avenue 



c 



URREN 



SAUCE 



t: 



The Front Page 

Life Sciences receives $50,000 grant 
Field House wing dedicated in honor of George Doherty 
Castille Returns to Festival 




1 Will Northwestern 
Be Smoke-Free? P 17 

■ SGA plans bill to solve smoking 
problem on campus 

■ Editorial pl8 



TheSummerSauce 



June 25, 1991 



The Summer Magazine of the Current Sauce 



Vol. 80, No. 1 



A SPECIAL REPORT 



[ OUISIlA jjPORTS pL OF fAME 



Six Inducted in Ceremony 

Hall of Fame Honors Louisiana's outstanding athletes and Coaches. 




Charley Tolar 




Roy Winston 




Don Chaney 




Ralph Ward 




Buddy Parker 




Gary Johnson 



Hall of Fame coverage begins on plO 



IMTniHMMI W! 



RESERVE >1 r F I Q I R S ? TRAINING CORPS 




BELIEVE IT OR NOT, THIS GUY 

IS IN CLASS. 



Excitement and adventure is the course descrip- 
tion, and Army ROTC is the name. It's the one col- 
lege elective that builds your self-confidence, 
develops your leadership potential and helps you 
take on the challenges of command. 

There's no obligation until your junior year, and that 
means there's no reason not to try it out right now. 




ARMY ROTC 



THE SMARTEST COLLEGE 
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE. 

For more information contact 
Major Stephanie Hargrove at 357-5156 



2 '.; Jtkatf 25, '1991 VieSumm&rSauce 



i 



The Front Page 



Life Sciences Department Receives $50,000 Grant 



The $50,000 grant from the Louisisna Education 
Quality Support Fund Enhancement Program will 

allow the university to purchase state of the art 
equipment in Geographical Information System and 
remote sensing technology. 



Dr. Tom Burns, head of the 
Department of Life Sciences.and Dr. 
Dick Stalling, professor of biology at 
Northwestern State University, have 
received a grant of $50,000 from the 
Louisiana Education Quality Support 
Fund Enhancement Program. 

The grant will allow the 
university to purchase state of the art 
equipment in Geographical 
Information System and remote 
sensing technology. 

Biology students in upper division 
classes in ecology, botany, limnology 
and forestry will be able to work in the 
newest field of environmental sensing. 

Current uses of the technology 
might include evaluation of forest 
lands and pinebark beetle infestation. 
Using air video interruption, the 
computer software can measure the 
area of infestation and provide 
predictive information on an 
infestation long before the damage 



becomes evident to the eye. 

The versatility of the software also 
offers the opportunity for the 
department to generate computer 
assisted instruction. A system called 
Hyperindex, when coupled to the 
multi-image processing system allows 
the user to link video images to 
; reference materials. 

The software would allow 
instructors to create an instructional 



program about wetland zoning. 
Students through the Hyperindex card 
would have access to color airphotos 
which would be linked to a color map. 

Students would be able pick a 
point on the color map, click on it with 
a pointer and have instant access to 
the airphoto. The student could 
retrieve any information on that 
airphoto or access airphotos for that 
same area from another day, month or 



year. 

A Geographical Information 
System accepts large volumes of 
spatial data, derived from any number 
of sources, including satellite sensors. 
Using this data, users can store, 
retrieve, manipulate, analyze and 
display the data in any manner they 
have set up. 

The stored data can then be 
layered to represent the topography for 
a given area, boundaries, vegetation 
types, biomass estimation, soil types, 
fish, endangered species and 
archaeological data. 

The system's remote sensing 
capability allows the operator to treat 
information gathered form aerial 
videography, thermal infrared and 
satellite imagery in a digital form. 
When converted to digital form it can 
be evaluated by computer-assisted 
image interpretation techniques. 




Hadley Castille: 
From Bluegrass to 
Cajun Blues 




Northwestern State University honored the late George Doherty recently by naming a wing of 
Northwestern's Athletic Fieldhouse in his honor. A portrait of Dorherty, who was a coach and 
athletic director at Northwestern for 11 years, will hang in the Fieldhouse. Doherty's wife, Mary; 
son, Mike and grandson, Jake .were present for the ceremony. 



The Natchitoches/ 
Northwestern Folk Festival 
and Cajun fiddler Hadley 
Castille have been closely 
connected through the years. 

Hadle/s first appearance 
on the festival progam came in 
1981 in the festival's second 
year when he brought a blend 
of traditional Cajun music and 
bluegrass to the main stage. 

In explaining this sound, 
Hadley recalled. "It kind of 
happened. A banjo picker from 
Shreveport, Sam Holloway, 
was hanging around 
Opelousas. He was good, and I 
said, 'What the heck, let's put 
him in the band." 

"At the time, I was not 
that familiar with the 
accordian. I always played and 
listened to the fiddle. And, 
there were still bands — the 
Hackberry Ramblers and Vin 
Bruce's group — that did not use 
the accordian." 

"I liked the mixture of the 
Cajun fiddle and the bluegrass 
banjo. Around Opelousas, my 
sound took some getting used 
to , but I got an invitation to 
Play in Canada, and the 
Canadians really liked my 
music." 

Hadley's son, Blake, plays 
lead guitar in the group. He 



added, "We were at the 
i Festival du Voyageur in 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, one year, 
and both local newspapers up 
there told their readers that 
our band was the one to hear. 
The other bands accused us of 
buying off the newspapers. 
Festival du Voyageur draws 
over half a million people." 

In 1985, Castille recorded 
an album with Doug Kershaw 
entitled Going Back to 
Louisiana — Je Suis Retourne a 
la Louisiane." 

Castille is proud that this 
album is "pure" Louisiana — 
"Louisiana written, Louisiana 
produced, Louisiana played, 
and Louisiana manufactured." 
Back to Louisiana and his 
' last two albums have been 
j manufactured and distributed 
by Ville Platte record man 
Floyd Soileau. 

A major change in 
Castille's music came in 1988 
when he dropped the banjo for 
good and added Mark Meier's 
j accordian. Blake Castille says 

the accordian adds a bluesy 
i overtone which fit the 

autobiographical materials in 
l the group's next to last 

recording, Along the Bayou 
! Teche, the story of Hadley 
| Castille's and his musical 



heritage. 

The band continued with 
the accordian-blues sound its 
most recent album, Two 
Hundred Lines — I Must Not 
Speak French. The title cut on 
this record tells about Cajun 
! children being forced to speak 
English in school. 

Along with Blake Castille 
on lead guitar and Meier on 
accordian, at the Natchitoches- 
NSU Folk Festival, Charles 



"Bogess" Davide will play 
drums, Doug Dugas will be on 
bass, and Ricky Williams will 
"scrub" the scrub board. 

Addition of the accordian 
! and the emphasis on 
autobiography brought the 
shift to a new name — The 
Louisiana Cajun Band. 

Even with the name, 
instrument, and personnel 
< changes in Castille's group, 
| Hadley Castille will bring his 



characteristic energetic, 
exciting dance music to the 
festival. 

Saturday night, July 20, 
promises to be a hot night to 
remember in air-conditioned 
Prather Coliseum on the 
campus of Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana 



More coverage of the Folk 
Festival or, page 8 



TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 3 



News in Brief 



Freshman Connection 

The second of four summer 
1991 Freshman Connection 
sessions is set to begin Thurs- 
day, July 11. 

Two other sessions are set 
for July 15-16 and July 25-26 
on Northwestern's campus. 

The cost of the program is 
$60. For more information on 
Freshman Connection 1991, 
contact Gail Jones at (318) 357- 
5901. 

Applications be accepted for 
Truman scholarship 

Applications are. now being 
accepted in Northwestern's 
Department of Social Sciences 
for the Harry S. Truman 
Scholarship program. 

Up to 92 Truman scholar- 
ships will be awarded to 
juniors at four year colleges 
and universities and sopho- 
mores at two year colleges 
around the nation. 

Students are nominated by 
faculty members for the 
scholarship. Those students 
must have established strong 
records of public and commu- 
nity service, be committed to 
careers in government or 
elsewhere in the public sector, 
have outstanding leadership 
potential, possess intellectual 
strength and analytical 



abilities and are likely to 
preform well in graduate 
school. 

Nominees must be in the 
upper third of their class and 
must be a U.S. citizen. 

The nomination deadline is 
December 2. For more infor- 
mation, contact Dr. Maxine 
Taylor at 357-6195. 

New magazines donated to 
Watson Library 

Northwestern's Watson 
Library recently received a 
donation on eight serial 
subscriptions from George and 
Conceil Celles of Cotton Patch, 
USA. George Celles is a 
Northwestern alumnus. 

The donated magazines 
include Automobile, a British 
magazine devoted to the 
veteran vintage and pre-1950s 
car and commercial vehicle 
owners; Decorating 
Remodeling, a bimonthly 
magazine devoted to decorating 
and remodeling and Glamour, 
the "how to fashion magazine 
for young women." 

Other donated titles 
include Home Office 
Computing, one of the most 
popular general computing 
magazines; New Business 
Opportunities, a bimonthly 
magazine presenting articles 



and information geared toward 
new business owners; New 
Woman, a magazine covering a 
variety of topics affecting 
women; Travel and Leisure, a 
magazine covering travel to 
exotic destinations and US, a 
celebrity feature magazine. 

"We are happy to receive 
these magazines because they 
will be a valuable contribution 
to our collection," said Amanda 
M. Young, assistant professor 
and head of the Media-Serials 
Division. "They will provide 
additional research and leisure 
reading materials for Watson 
Library users." 

Giant Garage Sale and Flea 
Market 

The Northwestern Campus 
Women's Club is sponsoring a 
giant garage sale and flea 
market August 3, in Prather 
Coliseum. 

Organizations, individuals, 
church groups, businesses and 
other groups may rent a 12X12 
space to sell arts and crafts, 
household items, food, clothing, 
garden supplies, plants, toys, 
books, records or any other 
items. Each space will rent for 
$25 and eight foot folding 
tables are available upon 
request for $5. Deadline for 
space rental is July 19. Spaces 



need to be rented as soon as 
possible. 

Admission to the garage 
sale and flea market is $1. 
Children under 12 are 
admitted free. 

For more information on 
obtaining space call 357-5611. 

DCI Summer Music Games 
seats available 

A limited number of prime 
50-yard line seats remain for 
the 1991 Drum Corps 
International Summer Music 
Games tour stop to be held at 
Turpin Stadium Sunday, 
August 11, at 7 p.m. 

Five of the top 30 drum 
corps in North America will 
take part in the competition to 
be held August 11 in Turpin 
Stadium. 

Scheduled to compete at 
Northwestern as part of DCI's 
1991 Summer Music Games 
are the Marauders of 
Longview, Wash., the Blue 
Knights from Denver, the 
Magic from Orlando, Fla.,the 
Phantom Regiment from 
Rockford, 111., and the Cava- 
liers from Chicago. 

The stop in Natchitoches is 
one of six stops around the 
country leading up to the DCI 
World Championships to be 
held in Dallas on Aug. 13. 



Advance tickets are 
available for $10 by calling 
(318)357-4522. Plenty of 
tickets are still available but 
the best tickets are selling 
quickly. 

Trumpet Ensemble performs 
at International Trumpet 
Guild Conference 

The Northwestern State 
University Trumpet Ensemble 
performed recently at the 
annual convention of the 
International Trumpet Guild 
held at LSU in Baton Rouge. 

The ensemble under the 
direction of Galindo Rodriguez, 
assistant professor of music, 
performed at the opening of the 
conference, presenting a well- 
received performance which 
included a commissioned work 
by Northwestern student 
Robert Thomas. The 
composition, written in honor 
of the founder of Natchitoches, 
is entitled Fanfare for St. 
Denis. The work is scheduled 
for release in December. 

The performance of the 
Northwestern Trumpet Choir 
was praised by jazz greats 
Bobby Shew and Marvin 
Stamm, who said they were 
presently surprised by the 
quality of sound and 
musicianship. 




Natchitoches 
Bicycle Center & 
Trophy Manufacturer 

Bicycle Sales and Repairs 
We Make Custom Trophies 




1516 Kyser 
Weekdays 1 0-5 Sat 9-2 
352-3831 




FOUR YEARS OF COLLEGE 
DOWN THE TUBES. 




If you think the tests in col- 
lege are tough, wait until your 
first job interview. Last year, 
America's businesses lost 



$60 billion to drugs. 

So this year, most of the 
Fortune 500 will be administer- 
ing drug tests. Failing the test 



means you won't be considered 
for employment 

After all. if you're into drugs, 
how smart can you be 



WE'RE PUTTING DRUGS OUT OF BUSINESS. 



Partnership /or a Drug-Free America 



4 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



News in Brief 



Eleven inducted in Kappa 
Omicron Nu 

Eleven students in 
Northwestern State 
University's home economics 
program were recently 
inducted as charter members 
in the Kappa Gamma Phi 
Chapter of Kappa omicron Nu. 
Eligibility criteria for 
undergraduate and graduate 
students and professionals 
include exemplary study and 
practice related to any of the , 
speciality areas of the field: 
early childhood education, 
fashion, housing and interiors, 
consumer services, hospitality 
and institutional services and 
home economics education. 

TheSummerSauce needs 
writers. 

TheSummerSauce is need 
of writers for the remaining 
two issues of the paper and all 
of the issues in the Fall and the 
Spring. 

If you have worked for a 
paper or yearbook, we would 
like your help in putting 
together the best publication in 
the Natchitoches area. 

We are also in need of 
photographers with experience 
in developing and printing film 
for the Fall and Spring semes- 
ters. Call us at 5456. 



Kappa Omicron Nu 



mwH t m tmtmtmffltttttt 




Those inducted are: Cheryl McBride, instructor of home economics; Bette Howell, instuctor of home economics; Julie 
Stuart, a hospitality and institutional services major from Haughton; Becky Efferson. an early childhood education major from 
DeRidder; Mary Ann Gillespie, a fashion major from Ferriday; Amy O'Conn. an early childhood education major from 
Natchitoches; DeAnn Warren, an early childhood education major from Winnfield; Mary P. Jones, an early childhood education 
major from Natchez, La.: Anita Brooks, a home economics major from Leesville; Terry Bryant, a housing and interiors major 
from Natchitoches; Patricia F. Billingsley, a hospitality and institutional services major from Pelican; Anjanete Lee, a 
hospitality and institutional services major from Shreveport; Faculty advisor Dr. Virginia Crossno and Becky Jones, a graduate 
assistant in home economics. 




SMOKED 

BHR-B'3t/£ 

"30 Years Combined Experience*" 
400 SL Denis 352-6164 

(Corner of Si. Denis & 4th) 
One Block from the Main Post Office 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 
10:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Sat. 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 



Meats 

Beef 

Pork 

Ham 

Sausage 

Hot Links 

Pork Ribs (small) 

Turkey (breast) 



Sandwiches 
S1.95 • 

Pounds 
$6.50 

Plates 
$4.75 



Small Poboy S2.50 
Larue Poboy S3. 50 
Rib Sandwich S3. 50 

Mixed Plates 
S4.95 



Chip Beef Sandwiches 2 for $1.50 or 85c Each 



Orders-1/2 lb. of meat with bread 



Salad $1.69 



To Go Salad 



S3. 95 
SI. 69 



Beans 
Order 
Pint 
Pint 



Potato Salad or Coleslaw 

80e Corn 55« 
SI. 00 Chips 50c 
SI. 65 Pickles 50* 
Peppers I5« 



Chip Beef Sandwiches 
2 for $1.00 every Saturday! 

Whole Boneless Hams S4.U0 lb. 

Whplc BonelessTurkey Breast . . . S4.00 lb. 



Drinks 70c & 90e 

Coke Tea 

Dr. Pepper Pink Lemonade 

Sprite 

Diet Coke Hecr $1.00 



WE CATER 

We Smoke Chickens $1.00 ea. 

We^Smoke Turkeys (any size) S8.95 

We Custom Cook Meat 50« lb. 



MeMaw's 
Restaurant 

22 1 Texas Street 

Natchitoches, LA 
Open 6 a.m. to 3p.m. 

357-7477 

Breakfast & Lunch Specials Served Daily 




TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 5 



The 
Summer 
Sauce 



Published every other week during 
the summer by the students of 
Northwestern State University 

Van Reed, Editor 
Jon Terry, Sports Editor 
Judy Francis, Staff 
Jason Oldham, Staff 
Damian Domingue, Staff 
LeonardWilliams, Staff 
Brian Shirley, Staff 
Russ Harris, Artist 
Chris Young, Photographer 
Eben Cook, Advertising 
Tom Whitehead, Adviser 

How to Reach 
TheSummer Sauce. 

(318)357-5456 Student 
Publications Office 

(318) 357-5096 Editor's Office 

(318) 357-5456 Advertising 

(318) 357-5213 Adviser's Office 

(318)357-6564 Fax # 

225 Kyser Hall 
P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 



From the Locker Room 



A Guide to 
Summer Sports 



Ah, summertime! A time for fun, frolicking, and 
physical activity. With the advent of nice, sunny 
weather (most of the time) and three-hour school 
days with a three-day weekend every three weeks, 
most people have a lot of spare time. So here is a 
quick guide to what to do with your spare summer 
hours (based on what is available at Northwestern), 
beside vegetating in front of the tube with a bowl of 
snacks, adding pounds and cholesterol and 
shortening your life-span (not to mention melting your mind). 

The first summer activity to come to mind is swimming. 
Though not much of a swimmer myself, it's definitely one way to 
really stay in shape. And the rec complex is open, free of charge, 
all afternoon. Not only that, but what a way to meet new people 
(of the opposite gender, of course!). 

Speaking of the rec, there is always the possibility of golf. 
However, unless you have the cash to pay the greens fees ($2 per 
nine holes for students), Tuesday is the only day 
available for the poor college student to 

chase little white balls. And don't forget V»ir Tr»ti 

to bring your own equipment, because *-* UI1 



their balls cost an arm and a leg, and they don't sell any other 
equipment. And don't forget to pray to the weather gods, because 
they'll boot you off at the slightest scare of rain. 

Perhaps you are like me, and prefer something a bit more 
physical than golf, with out the dampness of swimming. If you 
like to stay outdoors, there's always football or baseball. 
However, if you don't happen to have your own equipment and 
are forced to check things out from the Intramural Building, 
make sure to get an early start, because those lovely people at 
Leisure Activities close their doors at 4:30 of a weekday afternoon 
(I found out the hard way). Who knows their weekend hours, 
because they haven't yet seen fit to inform this publication. All I 
know is that, during the regular year, they don't open until 2 p.m. 
on weekends. 

The shame of this is all of the possibilities that Leisure 
Activities would normally provide for the bored student desirous 
of physical activity. Right off the top of the head is basketball (I 
might add that when I tried, the P.E. Majors courts weren't open 
at all), but don't forget that you can't bring your own ball. 

Among the many other possibilities at the IM building are 
racquetball, a variety of games like pool and boardgames (for you 
lazy types), plus a little weightlifting and a punching bag. But 
remember their hours!! 

Speaking of things that aren't open and available, don't try to 
go boating on Chaplain's. I realize that when it comes to water 
sports, most prefer skiing and try to go elsewhere, but it would be 
nice to put into Chaplain's in a canoe for a while. Alas, the 
boathouse doesn't appear to be open either. 

I must give credit to whoever runs the tennis courts, because 
they do appear to be open regularly for those who prefer chasing 
little yellow balls to little white ones. And there's always the 
possibility of running, you can do that anywhere. 

At any rate, it is summer, and most of us do have lots of free 
time (even those of us that work during the day), so go out and do 
something with your body. Youll live longer (and the opposite 
gender will be more impressed with you). 



Terry 



From the Locker Room will be an on- 
going sports column dealing with local 
and national sports. 



We Carry A Complete Line 
of Suntan Products 




CAUSEY'S 



axrnaa 



407 Bienville Street, Natchitoches, La. 
Open Monday thru Saturday 
8 a.m.-6 p.m. 
352-3141 



SHAKE UP YOUR STUDIES 
WITH A"TC8V" SHIVER.. 

You have four tests, six papers, and two lab reports all due within the 
next twelve hours. You've had your nose in a book for three days solid and 
you are beginning to experience serious brain drain. You need to shake things 
up with a "TCBV Shiver,, frozen yogurt treat. 

Choose from the great taste of Pineapple, Peaches, Blackberries, 
Blueberries, Bananas, SNICKERS* Bar, KUDOS* Granola Snacks, Reese's 
Pieces', or "M&.M's"* Chocolate Candies blended in with "TCBVT Frozen 
Yogurt. "TC8V." Frozen Yogurt has about half the calories of premium ice 
cream and is 96% fat-free. 



Cane River Shopping Center 
Natchitoches, LA 
352-9721 



ALL THE PLEASURE. NONE OF THE GUILT, 

"TCBV" 

The Country* BesHbgurt . 

1 0% Discount with NSU Student I D 



■ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-lOp.m. 
1 Sunday 12p.m.-10p.m. 




6 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 

i 16W ,5s $nu\> •aimn'VMitinuBWllf 




itmwmimmtiMtmmHir 



Financial Aid Update 



Financial 
Aid 



ASSOCIATE DECREE - Two Tear 
•FOUR-TEA* DECREE - B.S. 
riVE-YCAR DECREE 
MASTERS PROGRAM 
FK.D. PROGRAM 



First things first. 
Congratulations are in 
order to Patty 
BrerJkenridge for 
representing 
Northwestern at the 
recent Miss Louisiana 
pageant with great class. 
Her vocal talent was one 

of the best. 

Now, for this weeks article, I 
will inform you about the policies for 
Satisfactory Academic Progress in 
order to continue to receive financial 
aid. 



■ Satisfactory Academic Progress is defined as 
passing a required number of hours and achieving a 
required Grade Point Average during any semester or 
academic year. Academic progress will be reviewed once 



Tile, ' ^.CCR£SS STANDARDS 

' Untmusi Semester 
hours Earned 



STUDEHTS WITH 6-29 SSMS3TER HRS. PUPSUE Di 

Full-Time Student (12 or core hrs.! 9 

3/* TLme Student (9-U hrs . ) 6 

1/2 Tine Studen: 16-5 r.s.i 3 

STUDEWTS WITH 30-59 SgHESTER H*S, FURLED ; 

Full-Tine Student. (12 or more hri.) 9 

3/* Time Student (9-11 hrs.) 6 

1/2 Time Student (6-8 hrs.) 3 

STUDEHTS WITH 60 OR M03E SEMESTER HRS. PlfflSUQ : 

Full -Time Student (12 or more hrs.) 12 

3/* Time Student (9-U hrs.) 6 

1/2 Tim Student (6-8 hrs.) 3 

GRADUATE : 

Full -Time Student (9 or more hrs.) 9 

Pert-Time Student ( 

Federal atudent aid will be provided for a maxlmuei ofi 



per academic year,.usually at the end of the Spring semester. The Minimum 
Progress Standards Chart outlinje basic progress requirements. 



■ Any student NOT meeting 
the Minimum Progress Standards is 
not making Satisfactory Academic 
Progress and WILL NOT be eligible 
for any type of Federal assistance 
until they meet Minimum Progress 
Standards. 



Acaie.nlc 1c.tr 
Hours Earned 



IB 
12 
6 



Minimum Semester/ 
OverilllcA' 



1.50 
1.50 
1.50 



18 
12 
6 



2* 
12 
6 



18 

12 



I 

I.* 
1.75 

'1 

1 



2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

- - J 1 ' V'i 



3.0 
3.0 



90 Semester hours pursued 
180 Semester hours pursued 
200 Seaet ter hours pursued 
»5 Semester hours pursued 
60 Semester hours pursued 



■Based on 128-hour degree program. Students with degree, program requiring more hours 
■ay appeal for extended periods of entitlement. 



to keep switching back and forth. 



■ To re-establish financial aid 
eligibility, students must complete 
one regular semester at their own 
expense and meet the minimum 
semester hours and GPA for their 
enrollment status: Full time, 3/4 
time or 1/2 time. Staying out of 
school for a semester WILL NOT 
change eligibility status. 

■ This policy applies to all 
initial transfer, continuing and re- 
entry students. 

■ Remember, if you are 
expecting financial aid for the 
Summer, everything must be in 
place by June 28th. There will not 
be any further processing of 
Summer aid after this date. We are 
now processing financial aid for the 
Fall Semester and it is very difficult 



by Craig Poleman 



If you have any questions or need anything, stop by and speak to me or 
one of the Financial Aid secretaries in the Financial 
Aid office in Roy Hall or call us at 357-5961. 



Good luck on your finals!!!! 



All Tank Tops 





Sale June 25 Thru July 3 



Check Out The New Arrivals! 

University Bookstore 



/ N 



THE 



STUDENT 
7:30-4:30 Monday — Friday 



UNION 



TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 7 



part two in a series 



Huddie Ledbetter: 
The Man and His 
Music 




Country z3 



"Bead Belly occupies a special niche 
in the progression and evolution of 
American Music," observes Sean 
Killeen of Ithaca, New York. Killeen 
is one of several folk music scholars, 
musicians, and members of the 
Ledbetter family currently leading 
vigorous efforts to place Ledbetter, 
known to folk music fans as Lead 
Belly, in proper perspective and to help gain for him 
the respect he deserves. 

In 1888, Ledbetter was born north of Shreveport 
near the Texas- Louisiana border in Northwestern 
Louisiana. For several decades Ledbetter roamed 
Texas and Louisiana. Frequently, scrapes with the 
law landed him in prison in both states. 

However, Ledbetter's dedication to his music and 
his creative temperament probably saved his life. 
According to his autobiographical account, he sang 
himself out of a Texas prison and used his "mother 
wit" to escape from other threatening situations. 

Ledbetter wrote hundreds of songs which 
catalogued his experiences in the deep South. 
Although he profited little from it, "Goodnight Irene" 



became a classic in the folk music revival of the 
1960's. 

Before his death in 1949, Ledbetter lived in New 
York and became the musical companion of Pete 
Seeger, Woodie Gutherie, and many other noted 
folksingers. 

Ledbetter's name is most 
frequently linked with John 
and Alan Lomax, the father 
and son team who established 
the folk music collection in the 
Library of Congress. John 
Lomax took credit for helping 
Ledbetter gain freedom from 
the Louisiana State Prison at 
Angola. The Lorn axes also co- 
wrote several songs with 
Ledbetter and put him in 
front of audiences frequently 
made up of professors and 
college students. 

At the 1991 Natchitoches- 
NSU Folk Festival, Queen 
Tiny Robinson, Ledbetter's 
niece by marriage and 
executor of his personal 
estate, and five other 
authorities on Ledbetter and 
his geographial region will 
join in a discussion to 
interpret Ledbetter and his 
music and link him to the 
Ark-La-Tex and New York 

City, two important places in Ledbetter's life and 
musical development. 

The panel of experts will be chaired by Sean 




Killeen, editor of the Lead Belly Letter. Killeen and 
Robinson will be joined by Donald Aytch, Southern 
University Professor, Eric von Schmidt, musician and 
artist from Connecticutt, John Reynolds, expert on the 
Ledbetter Family and co-author with Tiny Robinson of 
a soon-to-be published book ol 
photographs of Ledbetter. 

Northwestern anthro- 
pologist H. F. Gregory will 
join the group to provide 
insight into the history and 
traditions of northwest 
Louisiana in the late 
nineteenth and early 
twentieth centuries. 
The panel discussion 
described above is scheduled 
for 6:15 to 7:45 pm, July 20 
(Saturday) in Room 142 of 
John Kyser Hall during a 
time when the regular folk 
festival will be in recess. 

Current plans call for the 
videotaping of the discussion 
by technicians from 
Northwestern State 
University. Members of the 
NSU television staff will be 
joined by cameramen 
sponsored by the Sean 
Killeen and the Lead Belly 
Ledbetter Letter. 

Hopefully, the one and one- 
half hour discussion will be edited into a 45 minute 
program suitable for various educational uses. 



SUPER SUMMER SPECIALS 



Go For The Glitz 

Sunglitz 
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Demon Sports 



Patel named Academic All- 
America tt 

Women's tennis captain 
Koren Patel became the first 
Northwestern athlete to win 
national Academic All- 
American recognition on the 
major college level Monday. 

Patel was a third-team 
selection on the 1991 GTE 
Academic All-America 
Women's At-Large Team 
announced in New York Citv. 
She was among 31 women from 
the sports of track and field, 
gymnastics, tennis, swimming, 
lacrosse, fencing and riflery 
honored by election to the 
team. 

Patel graduated last 
month summa cum laude with 
a 3.92 grade point average in 
business administration. The 
Winchester, England native 
was named Northwestern's 
Female Scholar- Athlete of the 
Year and was a three-year 
Academic All-Southland 
Conference selection. 

Patel was one of 22 women 
named last summer as a Volvo 
Tennis National Scholar- 
Athlete and is expected to 
receive that honor again this 
year from the coaches 
association. 

Patel ranks third all-time 



on Northwestern's Lady Demon 
career singles victory list with 
a 56-23 record, including two 
SLC runner-up finishes. She is 
fourth all-time in the career 
doubles rankings with a 63-22 
mark, including a school-record 
18-1 record in 1988. 

NSU track places 8 on All- 
Louisiana team 

Eight Northwestern State 
athletes are included on the 
1991 All-Louisiana Collegiate 
Track and field Team 
announced last week. 

The athletes of teams with 
the state's three top 
performances in each event 
made the team. 

Lady Demon senior Peggy 
Lewis made the team both in 
the shot put, where she had a 
school record of 48' 5 1/4" that 
ranked third in the state, and 
in the discus, with a 139' 0" 
throw thac also ranked third. 
Lewis has won the Southland 
Conference shot put title two 
consecutive years. 

Campti product Janice 
Miller, a junior, made the team 
with a school record 5' 8 3/4" 
high jump. 

The Demons put two triple 
jumpers, Ail-American LaMark 
Carter and Eric Lancelin. on 



the team along with the 400 
meter relay team of John 
Tappin, Shane Abernathy, 
Clarence Waiters and LaMark 
Carter. 

Carter was second in the 
triple jump with a best of 52' 8 
3/4" and Lancelin was third at 
51' 5 1/2". The relay team's 
time of 39.96 was second in the 
state. 

Demons place at TAC Jr. 
Nationals 

Northwestern State's Ryan 
Martin was sixth in the discuss 
and Trevor Aldredge eighth in 
the javelin competition in the 
TAC Junior National Track 
and Field Championships last 
weekend in Edina Minn. 

Martin, a freshman from 
Houston, threw 160' 5" — just 
four feet shy of his 1991 best — 
to finish sixth in a field of 25 
discus competitors. Aldredge 
was eighth with a 192' 0" throw 
in the javelin. 

Martin did not place in the 
shot put, throwing 46' 0". 
Trevor Harris was 13th of 16 
decathlon competitors, scoring 
5800 points. 

Reds tryout camp at NSU 

The World Champion 
Cincinnati Reds will hold a 



tryout camp Wednesday at 9 
a.m. at Northwestern States's 
Brown-Stroud Field. 

Reds scouts will conduct 
the camp. American Legion 
players must have written 
permission from their legion 
director to participate. 

Players must provide their 
own equipment. 

For more information, call 
the Demon baseball office at 
,557-4139. 



Brian Brown jumps in world- 
class competition 

Two-time national high 
jump champion and 
Northwestern alumnus, Brian 
Brown returned to world-class 
competition Saturday in the 
qualifying round of the USA/ 
Mobil One TAC National 
Championships, held in 
Randalls Island, New York. 

Brown went in to the 
qualifying round having not 
competed regularly since the 
1990 summer season. He 
responded with a 7' 1 1/2" 
jump, missing at 7' 2 1/2". 

No future plans have been 
announced yet for Brown's 
competition schedule, be he is 
expected to continue in a bid 
for the 1992 Olvmpic squad 



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So buckle up. Or you might break more than the law. 
And that would be the biggest bummer of all. 

Buckle Up 



© 



I A SPECIAL REPORT | 

[ CA {{PORTS jJALLOFfME 



CHARLEY TOLAR 

'A 5-foot-6 ballet' dancer who loved football 



by Jim McLain, Shreveport Times 



Charley Tolar squinted through the cigarette 
smoke in Antoon's Liquor Store, almost as if he could 
see back to 1960. 

That was the year the brash young Houston 
Oilers gave an undersized running back from 
Northwestern State another chance. 

"If I could I would have played football for 
the rest of my life," he said. "Not being able to 1 
play really hurt me." 

Six seasons was all of a couple of bad knees I 
would carry him, but it was enough for him to 
become the darling of the new American Footbal 
League and a member of the Louisiana Sports MB 
Hall of Fame's Class of 1991. 

"The Human Bowling Ball" and "The 
Manhole Cover" were two of the nicknames for 
the feisty fullback who packed 200 pounds on a 
mere 5-foot-6 frame and captured the 
imagination of fans with his darting, bull-like 
rushes. 

"Hell," said guard Hogan Wharton, who 
blocked for him then, "he wasn't little', he was 
just short." 

Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon of 
LSU was in the same Houston backfield, but it 
was Tolar, from little known Northwestern, who 
was the first Oiler to gain 1,000 yards (1,012 in 
1962). 

When Oiler fans picked the club's 30-year 
anniversary team, Tolar, still the club's No. 4 all 
time rusher with 3,288 yards, and Earl 
Campbell were the running backs. 

"That's a heckuva an honor," Tolar said. "I 
would like to have played with Campbell." 

And, according to Tolar's old teammates, 
Campbell would have liked to play in the same 
backfield with Tolar. 

"He was not only a good runner, but an 
excellent blocker and could catch the ball," 
Wharton said. 

And where a 5-6 back blocks a normal-sized 
defensive lineman can be a painful experience 
for the lineman. 

Bud McFadin, the former Denver tackle, hated to 
play against Tolar. 

"He used to complain to me later," Tolar said. 
"He'd say, *You'd be down behind those offensive 
linemen where I couldn't see you. I'd break through 
and think I had a clear path and next thing 1 know, 
you'd be hitting me in the groin'." 

The former Demon was afraid his chances to play 
pro football were over, however, when he was cut by 
Pittsburgh in 1959, ironically by Steeler coach Buddy 
Parker, another Class of '91 Hall of Fame. 

"I was one of the later cuts and Parker told me 
that it didn't seem right to have two short backs in the 
backfield. He also had Tom 'The Bomb' Tracy," Tolar 
recalled. 

But then the AFL came along. 



"I remember we drove to Houston in his station 
wagon," former Northwestern teammate Charley 
Hennigan recalled. "He'd been cut by Pittsburgh, I'd 
been cut by the Edmonton Eskimos. 




"We were free agents and when we got there they 
had 160 guys trying out. They'd run off a flight and 
run off a flight until there were just 60, and then they 
brought in the good guys, Cannon and all the draft 
choices." 

But when the dust cleared Hennigan and Tolar 
were still there. 

Hennigan, a record-breaking wide receiver, wasn't 
surprised. 

"He was a 5-foot-6 ballet dancer, the only guy I 
know who could run six inches off the ground and run 
a 9.5 100-yard dash," said Hennigan, himself a 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Famer. 

Not only was Tolar fast, he was surprisingly 
powerful. 

"He was the hardest fellow to knock down I've 
ever seen," said Jack Clayton, who coached Tolar at 



Northwestern. "He had such a low center of gravity." 

"It was pretty damn easy work (blocking for him)," 
said Wharton. "He had amazing strength and plenty 
of moves. He'd carry people six or seven yards." 
"He was something else." said Clayton. 
"Somebody asked me who was the best player I 
ever coached. I said, "That's easy. It was old 
Charley.' If we were behind five or six points 
and had the ball with five or six minutes to 
play, we could just give it to him every time 
and they couldn't stop him." 

Not only was Tolar a super football player, he 
long jumped over 23 feet and ran sprints for the 
Demons. 

"He had great speed. He ran against the Styron 
twins from Northeast ( who are in the Hall of 
Fame) and he'd be ahead of them for 60 yards. 
He could really accelerate," Clayton said. 

"He could dunk a basketball," said Hennigan, 
who often teamed with Tolar on off-season 
barnstorming tours with the Oiler basketball 
team. 

Hennigan said don't ever sell Tolar short on 
brains. 

"He finished Northwestern in three and a half 
years," he said. 

Tolar also got out of high school early and 
went through 1955 spring training at LSU after 
signing with Gaynell Tinsley the previous fall. 

But LSU had changed coaches by the time 
Tolar got there. 

"I knew I could never play for coach (Paul) 
Dietzel," he said. "We couldn't agree on 
anything. So, I left and laid out a year. 

"Coach (Walter) Ledet was instrumental in 
getting me back," he said of the former 
Northwestern assistant football coach. 

Tolar passed up his senior year at 
Northwestern when the Steelers took him in 
the 1959 "redshirt draft." 

"It was the biggest mistake 1 ever made. I 
should have played my last year at 
Northwestern and then, when the AFL started up. if 
I'd had as good a senior year as a junior year, it would 
have been beneficial to me," he said. 

^ Tolar fit right in with the Oilers, who won the 
AFL's first two championships and lost to the Dallas 
Texans in the title game in 1962. They were a fun- 
loving bunch and Tolar knew how to have fun. 

"Lord," Wharton recalled with a chuckle, "we got 
into some awful messes. Hardly any of 'em you can 
talk about." 

Tolar could also handle himself off the field and 
stories about him abound. One year, before the State 
Fair game with Louisiana Tech, it's reported he got in 
some early licks against the Demons' arch-rivals at a 
Shreveport bar on the Friday before the game. 

■ please see TOLAR, pl6 



10 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



I A SPECIAL REPORT | 

[ (IMA S PORTS ]|ALL OF flE 



BUDDY PARKER 



His colorful personality overshadowed brilliant football mind 



by Jim McLain, Shreveport Times 



There are a lot of colorful characters in the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, but on Saturday, June 
22, they all took aback seat to new member Raymond 
"Buddy" Parker. 

One of six men in the Class of 1991 who was 
inducted in Natchitoches, Parker once put his 
whole Detroit Lions team on waivers. 

The former Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers 
coach, who died in 1987, was an intriguing 
personality. A brilliant offensive tactician, he's 
remembered as much for his fiery temperament 
and often bizarre behavior. 

A Kemp, Texas, native who played on some 
of Centenary College's greatest teams in the 
1930's. Parker made his coaching reputation 
with an innovative, talented Detroit team. 

"One of the most brilliant football minds 
that ever existed," said Heisman Trophy winner 
Doak Walker, who teamed with fun-loving 
quarterback Bobby Layne to lead the Lions to 
NFL titles in 1952 and 1953. 

"He was also the most superstitious man in 
the world," said Walker, who now lives in 
Steamboat Springs, Colo. "As long as he was 
winning, he wore the same suit, tie, hat and 
shoes to games." 

There's probably never been a man in sports 
who hated losing more than Parker. That led to 
some crazy moments on return trips from out-of- 
town games. 

"I remember we had lost in San Francisco 
and on the plane coming back he cut the top of 
his hat out with a pocketknife." said Walker. 

Layne, who is also deceased, loved to tell the 
story about Parker firing his whole Detroit team. 

"We had lost the first six games of the 
season and were flying back from the West 
Coast. When we got to Denver, Buddy couldn't 
take it any more. He called Bert Bell, the (NFL) 
commissioner. 'Every S.O.B. on this team is on 
waivers,'!" Buddy screamed. 

The NFL office, needless to say, wouldn't 
sanction the move. 

"He'd get mad at a player and he might cut him 
right on the airplane." recalled Andy Russell, a rookie 
linebacker with Pittsburgh in 1963 

"He got angry with a rookie defensive back named 
Willie Daniels one time. Willie had tripped and fallen 
down and the other team had scored. He was really in 
Parker's doghouse. 

"We managed to get Willie on the plane before 
Parker got on and hid him in the men's room. Parker 
walked all over the plane, asking 'Where is he? Where 
is he?' 

"He never did find him and the next morning 
when he saw the film, he realized the guy did his job 
and was just unlucky." 

"We used to hide guys under blankets so he 
couldn't find them," ex-Steeler running back Dick 



Hoak recalled. 

"He once got so angry that he got the trainer to 
bandage his hands like a prize fighter and was going 
to fight every player," said Russell. "Fortunately, 




cooler heads prevailed." 

If Parker was saucy a fiery coach, people ask, how 
did he put up with the night life - loving Layne? 

"He didn't care what you did off the field, but he 
wanted you to produce on the field," said Yale Lary, a 
former Lions defensive back. "He wasn't a bedcheck 
man." 

One of the stranger incidents in Parker's NFL career 
came in 1957 when he abruptly quit the Lions before 
the season began. 

"It was at a Meet the Lions banquet in Detroit," 
Lary recalled. "He said, There comes a time in a 
coach's life when he can't control his players. I quit!' " 

"He could control his ployers," Lary maintains. 
"I'm sure Buddy was sorry later." 

The Lions, under George Wilson, went on to win 
the league title that year. 



Parker, who signed to coach Pittsburgh that same 
season, also had a kinder, gentler side. 

"Buddy loved kids," said Walker. "He invited kids 
(of players) that were able to take care of themselves 
to training camp. We usually had nine or 10 
boys that belonged to players out there and 
Buddy would play ball with them." 

"I always hung out with the team at training 
camp and did little odd jobs," said Bob Parker, 
43, Buddy's only child. "It was great fun if you 
were a kid." 

As volatile as he was on the field, his dad was 
different at home. 

"I remember him as being really mild- 
mannered, but very strict. He was fairly easy 
going. He didn't bring (football) home very 
much," he said. 

Parker could also be loyal to friends. 
On a trip to the West Coast one year, he came 
across a former Centenary sports manager, a 
black man nicknamed "Boots," who was shining 
shoes in the airport. 

Buddy brought him back to Detroit and gave 
him a job with the Lions and later with the 
Steelers. 

"He was my babysitter at training camps," 
Bob Parker said. "He worshiped my dad and 
followed him around everywhere." 

Although his old player like to talk about 
Parker's often strange behavior, they also 
respected him as an offensive tactician. 

"He did a lot of things at that time that were 
verv innovative." Hoak said 

"We were playing Cleveland and at that time 
everyone played the four-three i defense). 

"He pulled one guard one way and the other 
guard the other way. The center blocked the 
middle linebacker and the tackles blocked down 
on the defensive tackles. 

"Their people started running out of there 
(following the pulling guards) and that left the 
middle open for our fullback. That was a big 
pla\ for John Henry Johnson," he said. 

"It seemed like every game he would come up with 
a strategy that would get us an easy touchdown," said 
Russell. "He'd find one player who had a weakness or 
a tendency and he'd pick up on it." 

"One of the biggest reasons Layne had so much 
success was because he taught Bobby how to beat 
those defenses," said Walker. 

Walker, who played at SMU, is a legend in the 
Southwest Conference as broken field runner, but he 
says Parker was able to improve his talents. 

"He helped me tremendously on my footwork and 
how to beat a defensive player," he said. 

"He was a super technician of the game," said 
Lary. "He and Paul Brown (of Cleveland) were the 

■ please see PARKER, p 16 



TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 11 



I A SPECIAL REPORT | 

[OUISIAM {{PORTS || II! OFf AME 



DO N CHANEY 

Momma knew best for Hall of Famer 

by Michael A. Lough, Alexandria Daily Town Talk 



'11 



It might have been "Don Chaney, all-American 
football player." 

Or "Football coach Don Chaney." 

Except momma would have nothing to do with her 
son playing football. 

"I wanted to play quarterback," said Chaney, 
head coach for the Houston Rockets "Before I 
was really able to finish a season, my mother 
prevented me from playing football." 

Chaney, one of six inducted into the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in Natchitoches 
Saturday, still chuckles at the memory. 

"I had a friend who had his teeth knocked 
out the day before, arid she asked what 
happened. She said, 'uh oh' and she just walked 
on the field and took me by the collar." 

Laughter comes easily to the easy going 
Chaney. 

"She totally embarrassed me," he said. "She 
didn't want me to play football at all." 

Chaney, 45, survived and became one of 
Baton Rouge's best high school basketball 
players, earning Parade and Scholastic 
Magazine Ail-American honors his senior year at 
McKinley High under Coach Carl Stewart, who 
then went on to coach at Southern University. 

"In my opinion, he (Stewart) was a little 
before his time in terms of coaches," said 
Chaney, who still has relatives in Baton Rouge 
and last visited in early June. "He believed in 
the uptempo, fast-break style. Really, I was 
heavily influenced by his coaching and teaching." 

Stewart, who still lives in Baton Rouge, 
finished with a career mark of 425-143 over a 22- 
year-span. 

Stewart remembers the first time he saw 
Chaney on the court. 

"After the 1961 season, i came out during 
the noon hour and watched 3-on-3 games," he 
said. "Don Chaney happened to be one of the 
kids. 

"When those guys noticed that I was looking 
at them, they surmised that I was looking at Don 
Chaney. As a result, he put on a show. He put the 
ball between his legs — he was spindly, a very thin 
boy. 

"But I was amazed at his ability to handle the 
ball." 

So Stewart called him over. 

"I said, *why didn't you come out for basketball 
this year', " Stewart said. "We were loaded with 
talent. He said, 'well, I know I wouldn't have made it, 
I can't play with those guys.' 

"I said, '111 tell you what. I'm going to give you a 
basketball, and if you bring it back to me slick — it 
was a rubber basketball — '111 let you come out for the 
team.' 

"As it goes, he didn't bring the ball back, but he 
did come out to play." 

12s i June 25, 199,1 V>eSummerS*uce 



Three years later, schools from around the country 
were interested in the services of Chaney. One that 
wasn't stood just blocks away from his home: LSU. 
And there was only one reason: Chaney was black. 




"I was considering a lot of colleges," Chaney said. 
"But I'd like to have had the opportunity to consider 
one more. I was never given that opportunity." 
Teammate Leslie Scott chose Loyola of Chicago, which 
had just won the NCAA championship. Chaney joined 
Elvin Hayes and the pair became the first black 
basketball players at the University of Houston. 

"It was very, very difficult for a lot of reasons," 
Chaney recalled. "Being a kid going to high school at 
an all black school, now finding yourself going to a 
school predominantly all white, it was not an easy 
transition." 

While northern blacks found the move to the 
south easier - they already intermingled much more 
with whites - Hayes and Chaney were amidst tension 
and prejudice. 

That eased with the first tip-off their freshman 



year. 

"Our freshman team was better than our varsity 
team," he said. "We had intrasquad games and we'd 
always beat the varsity. After we'd beat them, they 
didn't sneak to us." 

The fact that fans stood to watch the 
freshman team, then left before the varsity 
game, didn't help either. 

It didn't last long, though, because Chaney 
and Hayes helped put Houston — and college 
basketball — on the national sports map. 
Chaney was part of the legendary Houston- 
UCLA game in the Astrodome back in 1968. 

During Chaney's three-year varsity career, 
the Cougars reached the Final Four twice, and 
he averaged 12.6 points over his career, earning 
second-team All-American honors in 1968. 

His long arms earned him the nickname 
"Duck" and opponents constantly praised his 
defense A Houston Chronicle feature in 1968 
measured his wingspan at 82 inches from 
fingertip to fingertip. 

Said Chaney in the story: "I owe a lot to my 
arms." 

One of the nation's premier players, Chaney 
was expected to be an early draft choice. 

"Immediately after his final year, I got a call 
from him," Stewart said. "He said, 'I'm being 
worried to death, Coach, but these North 
Carolina Cougars (of the old ABA).' 

"They had drafted him No. 1 and Boston 
drafted him No. 2 on their team. He asked me 
if I would take him to Boston. I got a call from 
(Red) Auerbach asking me to bring him up for 
the signing." 

The Celtics had hoped to announced the 
Chaney signing at a game that weekend back in 
1968, but civil rights leader Martin Luther King 
was assassinated and that Sunday's game was 
postponed. 

f "haney signed — imagine him going to the 
Cougars? — and spent 9-1/2 years with the 
Celtics, during which Boston won five division titles 
and two world championships. 

And Chaney had a major impact, playing key 
roles on the 1969 and 1974 NBA championship teams. 
Named to the league's All-Defensive team five times, 
Chaney averaged 8.5 points per game. 

He spent a year in the ABA with St. Louis, and 
returned to the NBA with the Lakers for a year before 
going back to Boston. Chaney — who has a brother in 
Baton Rouge and two sisters in LJi. — became an 
assistant coach with Detroit in 1980, then took over 
the Los Angeles Clippers for two years as head coach. 

This season, in his second year as boss of the 
Rockets, Chaney was named Coach of the Year. The 
same day, he signed a multi-year contract with the 

■ please see CHANEY, pl5 




ROY WINSTON 

Position changes paved way for great NFL career 



by Sheldon Mickles, State-Times 



When Roy "Moonie" Winston left LSU for the 
National Football League in 1962, he knew he couldn't 
and wouldn't make it as an offensive guard. 

After all, there weren't many roster spots 
available for 6- foot, 217-pound guards, not even 
for an Ail-American like Winston who was 
named the best guard in the Southeastern 
Conference his senior season. 

Less than a year later, there was some 
doubt Winston could play anywhere for the 
Minnesota Vikings, who selected him in the 
fourth round of the 1962 draft. Only this time, it 
wasn't Winston who was skeptical. 

"My first year, they put me at middle 
linebacker and I started two or three games," 
Winston recalled recently. 
"I missed a few signals and (Coach) Norm Van 
Brocklin got on me one day. He said, *when we 
got you, they (scouts) said you were a short 
guard and possibly a linebacker. Well, you can't 
play either one.' " 

That lit a fire under Winston, who was given 
the nickname after he was born with a full, 
round face when the comic strip Moon Mullins 
was popular in the early 1940s. 

"I told him they hadn't even played me 
where they told me they were going to play me, 
at outside linebacker," Winston said. 

The next year, he was moved to left outside 
linebacker in training camp. He broke into the 
starting lineup right away and was a fixture 
there for 13 years until being supplanted by 
Matt Blair. 

For years, Winston was one of the league's 
best linebackers, and his efforts for one of the 
premier defensive teams of the '70s — as well as 
those during his career at Istrouma High in 
Baton Rouge and LSU — have earned him a 
place in the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. 

Winston will be inducted with five of the 
state's all-time sports greats in ceremonies 
Friday and Saturday at Natchitoches. 

It's a good bet Winston, who was also an 
outstanding baseball player at Istrouma, will 
remember some of the great coaches and tradition- 
laden teams he played for during his career. 

"I feel extremely fortunate to be involved with the 
people I was involved with over all the years," he said. 
"And I'm talking about players as well as coaches." 

At Istrouma, Winston played for legendary coach 
James "Big Fuzzy" Brown. Later, he was a starting 
guard and defensive tackle for Paul Dietzel before Van 
Brocklin and Bud Grant coached him with the 
Vikings. 

As if that impressive lineup wasn't enough, 
Winston also learned his trade under some top-notch 



assistant coaches — Charlie McClendon, Harry 
Gilmer and Jim Carr — before his career ended 
following the 1976 season. 

Even though he was a prep and college Ail- 




American, Winston is probably best known for his 
professional career. As a member of the feared 
"Purple People Eaters" defense, he helped the Vikings 
go to four Super Bowls. 

"I really don't know how the 'Purple People 
Eaters' got started," he said, "hut it just kind of grew 
on us." 

Actually, it grew by leaps and bounds after tackle 
Alan Page joined the team in 1967 and linebacker 
Wally Hilgenberg and free safety Paul Krause came 
aboard a year later. 

"When those guys came in, we started playing 
well together and the 'Purple People Eaters' just kind 
of came out of nowhere," said Winston. "In 1968, we 



led the league in a lot of categories and wound up with 
the best overall defense. 

"A couple of years later, we had three or four 
shutouts in a 14-game season," he said with pride, 
"and that was unheard of at the time." 

It was during those glory years that the 
Vikings, who captured eight NFL and NFC 
Central Division titles with Winston in the 
lineup, went to the Super Bowl four times. 
They also lost four times. 

"I've always said it's better to be second than 
third or fourth and so on," Winston said, trying 
to manage a laugh. "But seriously, it feels like 
something was not fulfilled. It's like a void. 

"If I would have won it just once, it would 
have been a crowning moment to a long and 
wonderful career. But it just wasn't meant to 
be, and as you get older, you learn to accept the 
things that are not meant to be." 
Former teammate Lonnie Warwick says 
Winston, who was the Vikings' defensive MVP 
in 1972, has nothing to be ashamed of. 

"The thing I've always said about Roy is 
Tiere's a guy 6-feet tall and 220 pounds.... he's 
not supposed to be playing in the NFL,' " said 
Warwick, who played right linebacker for the 
Vikings. "But you can forget that. The things I 
remember about Roy are that he had 
tremendous quickness and a great knowledge of 
the game. 

"He looked at so much film he knew what the 
other team was going to do, which gave him a 
great advantage, and he always had the best 
grades when the coaches looked at the films." 

But because Winston played when he did — 
he was approximately 20 years ahead of his 
time — he didn't make the best salary. He 
earned $12,000 in salary and a $4,000 bonus as 
a rookie. In his final season, Winston pocketed 
$70,000. 

For one thing, Winston had to bargain with 
Jim Finks, who was the Vikings' general 
manager for several years. Finks, now the president 
and GM of the New Orleans Saints, is known as a 
tough negotiator. 

Winston, however, said his old boss was fair. 
"He never refused me what I asked," said 
Winston. "I just didn't ask for enough. 

"I got my minimums mixed up ... I'd always ask 
for the minimum, and he'd give it to me," Winston said 
laughing. "I would present my case, and he would 
look it over and say 'OK.' And then I would walk out 
and say 'he got me again!' " 

And more often than not, as his selection to the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame will tell you, the 
Vikings got more than they bargained for. 



TMrSutnmerSauce June 25, 1991 13 



I A SPECIAL REPORT | 

[ OHlSIAM jjPORTS ||ALL OF f AME 



RALPH WARD 



Hard-nosed coach wrote state's basketball history 



by Bobby Dower, Lake Charles American Press 



As Ralph Ward saw it, there was only one way to 
play the game of basketball — with hard-nosed, man- 
to-man defense and disciplined offense. 

For 19 seasons, those were the trademarks of 
Ward-coached teams at McNeese State 
University. 

That philosophy produced an NAIA national 
championship, six Gulf States Conference titles 
and an overall record of 282-194. 

Ward was honored posthumously, Saturday 
in the town he grew up in. into the Louisiana 
Sports Hall of Fame. 

"It's certainly well deserved," says Lenny 
Fant, a member of the Louisiana Sports Hall of 
Fame who coached 15 years against Ward. 
"Ralph was one of those dyed-in-the wool 
dedicated basketball people who lived and 
breathed basketball night and day, 12 months 
out of the year." 

A native of Jena, Ward played collegiately at 
Northwestern State University in 1946-47. He 
posted a 51-10 record as a high school coach at 
many before joining the staff of legendary Henry 
"Hank* Iba at Oklahoma State as an assistant. 

It was under Iba that Ward learned the 
defensive principles for which his Cowboy teams 
became renowned. 

"He accepted Iba's defensive philosophy and 
espoused it to the fullest," says Fant. "He was a 
defensive specialist." 

Ward took the head coaching duties at 
McNeese prior to the 1952-53 season and made 
an immediate impact, guiding the Cowboys to a 
17-13 record and second-place finish in the GSC. 

"We thought the man was out of his gourd," 
recalls Dick Miller, who was a senior on Ward's 
first team at McNeese. "He had taken over for 
Mr. (Wayne) Cusic. who was an excellent coach. 
But Coach Ward really emphasized defense. 
After we won eight games in a row, the players 
figured he knew what he was talking about. 

"I was a guard and he made a post man out 
of me. I was fortunate to lead the team in rebounding. 
That was one thing about Ralph. He was real good 
about knowing what he needed for his system and 
making players fit in his system. 

"Ralph certainly changed the way basketball was 
thought of at McNeese. And he changed the 
philosophy of basketball in the state of Louisiana." • 

In 1956. Ward directed the Cowboys to the 
national championship, one of only two national titles 
that has been won by a Louisiana men's basketball 
collegiate program. Paced by the scoring of Bill 
Rfigel, who averaged 33.9 points per game, and 

■founding of Frank Glenn, McNeese posted a 33-3 
record. 

The Cowboys also secured the first of five GSC 
crowns that they would win in an eight-year span. 
During that stretch, Ward's teams posted a 148-58 

14 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



mark. 

Ward's Cowboys captured another GSC crown in 
1968 when Ed Green, Dean Glenn and the Andrew 
twins, Keith and Kent, sparked the Pokes to a 20-5 




mark and a berth in the NCAA Division II playoffs. 

Ward retired after the 1971 season and died in 
1985. 

Time may have dulled the memory of the wins 
and losses and championships, but Ward's approach to 
the game burns brightly. 

"The one thing that made him successful was his 
dogmatic approach," Fant says. "Ralph Ward coached 
according to his conviction and his personality. And 
his teams played his game to the hilt. You never saw 
a kid on his team fail to hustle. And I can't say that 
about many coaches." 

Ward was committed to a man-to-man defense." 
In fact, the mere mention of the word "zone" was akin 
to profanity. 

"I never heard zone mentioned in a positive 
manner," says Ed Young, a former assistant coach 



under Ward. "His teams played) man-to-man defense 
l with strong backside help. And there was no 
switching. You had to work over the top of picks. 
"There was no free pass dowjn the lane. It was 
aggressive basketball, but it wasn't dirty. He 
believed the lane belonged to the defense." 

Says Miller: "Early in his career, he felt like 
you wouldn't get beat by anyone shooting from 
the outside. Consequently, you didn't let 
anybody drive down the lane or to the baseline." 

Ward was a stern taskmaster. He demanded 
discipline on both ends of the floor. The 
aggressiveness of the defense Ward taught 
often led to fights at practice between 
teammates. 

"It was a challenge to play for Coach Ward," 
says Sonny Watkins, who played and later 
coached under Ward. "You had to have self- 
discipline to play for him. 

"He coached with a purpose. His entire 
system was structured. Everything was carried 
out to the finest detail. 

"His practices would sometimes run three- 
and-a-half to four hours. Practice was very 
physical. We might have two or three fights a 
week because practice was so competitive. It 
would push you to the point of frustration. But 
those fights also brought the team closer 
together." 

According to Fant, Ward's methods got the 
most out of his talent. 

"Ralph could take inferior or mediocre talent 
and mold them into winners," says Fant. 

Long-time NLU sports information director 
Bob Anderson says, "Ward was the type of 
coach who could take one shooter and four other 
mediocre players and win with them because of 
the defense he taught." 

"You'd get pulled (out of the game) quicker for 
a mistake on the defensive end than on the 
offensive end," says Watkins. "And if he didn't 
think you were hustling, you might take a seat 
next to him and not go back in the game. 

"He could get tremendous mileage out of players. 
If a kid thought he only had one mile in him, Coach 
Ward could get three or four out of him. He pushed 
players to a level they thought they couldn't attain. 

"You've heard of men that strike fear into other 
men. Coach Ward wasn't a big man, but he could 
make grown men tremble in their shoes out of respect 
and fear." 

Clyde Briley, a two-time all-GSC guard on Ward's 
teams in the mid-1960s, saw both the tough and soft 
side of Ward. 

"Coach Ward had a black jacket with McNeese 
I written on the front of it," says Briley. "After a loss, if 
he was wearing that black jacket zipped up and the 
collar turned up, you'd better get ready in practice. 
■ please see WARD, pl5 



I A SPECIAL REPORT | 

[QUIA! A SPORTS J|ALL OF^AME 



GARY JOHNSON 

They call him "Big Hands" 



by Buddy Davis, Ruston Daily Leader 



As the owner and operator of two Baskin-Robbins 
franchises in southern California, Gary Johnson deals 
in "scoops" every day. 

But there was nothing like the "scoop" that the 
former Grambling State University star learned 
of back in late January. 

Johnson was tending to one of his Baskin- 
Robbins stores in Scripps Ranch, Calif., when he 
received a telephone call from Louisiana Sports 
Hall of Fame Director Doug Ireland. 

Ireland was calling to tell "Big Hands" that 
he had been selected as one of the inductees for 
the 1991 class honored Saturday. 

"I thought it was Ernest Sterling, my line 
coach at Grambling, getting one of his friends to 
pull a practical joke on me," recalled Johnson. 
"That was my first reaction. I thought coach 
Sterling was up to one of his old tricks again." 
But this was no joke. 

The Shreveport native was, indeed, among 
the individuals selected to be enshrined at the 
Natchitoches-based Hall and join such Louisiana 
athletic legends as Eddie Robinson, Willis Reed, 
Billy Cannon, Vida Blue, Willie Brown, and 132 
others. 

"After I finally found out it was true," he 
said, "I said to myself, 'oh, not me, not in the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame.' Me? 1 couldn't 
believe it. I mean, I looked over the Hall of 
Fame foklet and I couldn't believe the legends 
that had already been inducted. Just being 
there alongside coach Robinson is a dream come 
true in itself." 

Johnson is regarded as one of the all-time 
great defensive linemen in Grambling's storied 
history. 

The 6-2 and 251 -pound linemen was chosen 
as the "Defensive Player of the Year" by the 
Sheridan Broadcasting Network following an 
incredible 134-tackle senior season with the 
Tigers. 

A three-time Ail-American and All- 
Southwestern Athletic Conference choice, Johnson 
was the eighth player selected in the 1975 National 
Football League draft, where he was taken by the San 
Diego Chargers. 

He made four Pro Bowl appearances for the Chargers 
before being traded to the San Francisco 49ers in 
1984, where he was a member of the franchise's first 
Super Bowl team that year. 

"That was the highlight of my career in the pros, 
being able to go to$he Super Bowl," he remembered. 
"It just didn't last long enough. 

"In college, it was just a thrill to be able to play 
with so many great teams at Grambling. We'd go out 
and just dominate our opponent. Just being able to be 
a part of all of those great teams under coach 
Robinson was a highlight in itself." 



Johnson was known for his outstanding pass 
rushing skills and ended up his 1 1-year career in the 
pros with 72 1/2 quarterback sacks that totalled 659 
yards in losses. 






His best single season came with the Chargers in 
1980 when he recorded 17 1/2 sacks. 

An All-NFL selection of "The Sporting News" in 
1980, he returned pass interceptions for touchdowns of 
39 and 52 yards and recovered a fumble for a TD 
during that season. 

"At first, it was tough adjusting to the pros' 
defensive scheme," Johnson said. "At Grambling, we 
would read (the offenses) on the run. During my first 
two years with the Chargers, we used the 'read and 
react' scheme. It took me about two years to really 
feel comfortable up there 

Johnson's well known nickname began back 
during his days at Bossier City's Mitchell High. 

During a basketball practice session one day, the 
coach noticed Johnson's big hands and told him, "son, 



you've got the biggest hands I've ever seen." 
The name stuck. 

Called "the best defensive lineman we've ever had 
at Grambling" by former Tigers' sports information 
director Collie Nicholson, Johnson has owned 
and operated the Baskin-Robbins franchises for 
the past six years. 

"It's a lot of fun," he said. "I enjoy it. But, of 
course, anytime you work around food a lot, you 
tend to indulge in it." 

Double scoops of strawberry, vanilla, or 
raspberry notwithstanding, Johnson remains in 
excellent shape by playing racquetball and 
lifting weights. 

"Gotta watch that weight, you know," he said. 

Chaney: made Hall of 
Fame 

■ continued from pl2 
Rockets. 

Now 30 years after Carl Stewart saw him 
own a 3-on-3 game, Chaney made the Louisiana 
Sports Hall of Fame, joining Hayes, who made 
it two years ago. 

"I'm trying to get my mother to come," said 
Chaney, whose mother lives in L.A. "She's 
really been the key to my success. She basically 
had to maintain two jobs so we could function. I 
think we got a good foundation of right from 
wrong. 

"She gave us a little freedom, but at the same 
time, she had a firm hand." 

A firm enough hand to drag him off the 
football field. 

"When you're in high school," Chaney said, 
starting to laugh, "your mother runs the show." 



Ward: McNeese basketball 

■ continued from pl4 

Any mistake in a drill and you paid for it. 

"But he cared for his players. I always 
appreciated the fact that before you could go home for 
the semester, you had to go to Coach Ward's office and 
tell him what your grades were. He was very 
concerned about his players graduating." 

"Coach Ward had a heart of gold," says Miller. 
"He'd give anything for one of his former players. He 
was always interested in their lives and their careers, 
even after they finished playing for him. 

"Anytime you bring up McNeese basketball, Coach 
Ward comes to mind. He was McNeese basketball and 
still represents McNeese basketball." 



TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 15 



Tolar: He won't quit on you 



■ continued from page 10 

Tolar smiles at the memory. 
"There was a little tussle," is all he'll 
say. 

"I'd want to have him with me if I 
ever got in that real dark alley," said 
Wharton. "He won't quit on you." 
It was while out on the town one night 
that Tolar always known as a guy 
who'd try anything at least once got 
the most unusual off-season job any 
athlete ever had. 

"Red Adair, the oil well firefighter, 
and I frequented the same club in 
Houston. He was a big fan of the 
Oilers and we became friends," Tolar 
said. "One night, I said, 'Red, why 
don't you hire me?" 

"He called the next day and asked 
me if I had a passport. I said no, and 
he told me go get one because you're 
going to North Africa.' 



"They called it the 'Devil's 
Cigarette Lighter'," he said of the 
flaming well in Algeria. "You could 
see it for miles. 

I said, 'Oh. God. Charley, you've 
really gotten in trouble now!' 

"I believe I got more notoriety 
from that than football," he said. "I 
just did it for two years. I would 
probably have stayed with it if I'd had 
any background in it." 

Wharton. Hennigan and several 
other old Oilers plan to be in 
Natchitoches for Charley's big day. 
They owe him. Wharton said. 

"He was the heart of the whole 
dadgum team. We saw this little 
sucker doing it and got to figuring we 
could do it too. I wouidn t miss it for 
all the tea in China." 



Parker: Buddy's football 

intelligence is far above the 
average. 



■ continued from page 10 

innovators." 

Although he was voted into the 
Hall of Fame as a coach. Parker was a 
very good player both as a collegian 
and a pro. 

There were two Centenary all- 
time football teams selected after the 
school dropped the sport following the 
1947 season, and Parker is the first- 
string fullback on both of them. 

"He was able to gain against all 
our opponents and is a great defensive 
linebacker," then Centenary coach 
Curtis Parker (no relation) wrote in a 
letter recommending Parker, his team 
captain, to the Detroit Lions after 



Buddy's last season as a Gent in 
1934. 

"He's one of the hardest running 
backs I have seen. He has plenty of 
drive and is very hard to get off his 

feet." 

Then he wrote something that 
was very prophetic. 

"Buddy's football intelligence is 
far above the average." 

"When Buddy put something on 
the board, everyone paid attention," 
said Walker. "If he told us to run 
head-first into a wall, we did it 
because we believed in him. It was 
really a pleasure to play under him." 



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16 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Features 



WILL 

NORTHWESTERN 
BECOME 

SMOKE - FREE? 





ill 



niversities around the country have 
banned smoking from their 
campuses. All West Virginia 
universities, USL, Tulane, 
Stanford, Arizona have enacted 
legislation to ban smoking from their campuses. 
Most recently, Pittsburgh and John Hopkins 
University have joined the ranks. They banned 
smoking in all university vehicles, dorms, labs 
and all university building. 
* "There really hasn't been much of a student 
reaction," Pitt student Njugi Nginyo told the 
College Press Serve. 

Will Northwestern be next? Will 
Northwestern become smoke-free? 

Northwestern's Student Government 
Association says "yes" The SGA is in the process 
of addressing this further by attempting to ban 
smoking in academic buildings and adjacent 
areas. 

Scott Andrews, SGA president at 
Northwestern is in favor of the bill and hopes that 
it passes. He stated the purpose of the bill is "to 
create a safe, healthy, and comfortable 
environment for students, staff and guests." 

The bill simply put would prohibit smoking in 
all buildings except student and faculty offices 
and dorm rooms. 

Northwestern already has banned smoking in 
university vehicles. 

Andrews said one of the biggest hurdles is 
whether or not both parties, the smoker and the 
non-smoker, can agree that either ones rights are 



being violated. The bill has been on the drawing 
board for two years now, but Andrews is 
determined to offer it as a bill this fall. 

The second part of this bill are the limits and 
how literal it should be translated into use, "If a 
professor is smoking in his office and a student 
enters the room, does that student have the right 
to ask him to stop?" Andrews expressed the many 
stipulations that are involved in this bill, 
including enforcement. 

USL's law is not enforced, but according to 
report that appeared in the university's 
newspaper, students are expected to abide by it. 

According to Andrews, the SGA is considering 
the creation of smoking lounges and designated 
smoking areas, but as he points out, there is 
another issue involved; money. 

Many universities have taken the smoking 
ban one step father — forcing their schools to drop 
investments in tobacco companies. Stanford, for 
example uses invested one of their endowment 
funds in a tobacco company. They recently pulled 
their stock out of the company. 

Harvard University and City University of 
New York had stock invested in tobacco 
companies, but they no do not allow their 
endowments to be invested in these companies. 

Andrews told the Current Sauce that the 
smoking bill would go before the student senate 
sometime in the fall. 

■ Editorial, pl8 

■ Readers Form, pl8 

■ Current Quotes, pl9 



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IMPORTANT MESSAGE 
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FROM THE 

NATCHITOCHES 
HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB 

YOU may join for the summer for only $75.00 (That includes 
tax and entry fee.) All you have to do is pay up front. With this 
great special, you may use racquetball, basketball, aerobics, 
weights, stairclimbers and we have men's and women's 
dressing rooms and protein bar. 

IF you want to pay by the month. 
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$22.50 a month (summer contract) 

WE ARE IN WALKING DISTANCE FROM ANYWHERE 

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400 College Avenue 
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a Week 



TheSummerSauce June 25, 1991 17 



Editoral Page 




TheSummerSauce 

EDITORIAL 

Smoking and 
Northwestern 



ulane, USL, Stanford, all West Virginia 
universities, Arizona, Pennsylvania State 
universities and, this week, John 
Hopkins University have adopted a 
partial or total ban on smoking on 
campus. Will Northwestern be next? 

It looks that way. But should Northwestern 
follow in the footstep of other universities? 

No. The Northwestern SGA and 
Administration should not accept a total ban 
policy, rather the SGA should adopt a 
resolution stating their disapproval of smoking 
in certain areas — the classrooms, the library, 
university vehicles, Prather coliseum, labs and 
other public, high traffic areas. 

This resolution should "pass the butt" to the 
various departments. Allow the Math 
Department to set their own smoking rules in 
their offices. Allow the English Department to 
set their own smoking rules in their offices. 
Allow the Scholars' College to set their own 
smoking rules in their offices. 

This will take the burden off of the 
administration and the the SGA in enforcement 
and funding of smoke-lounges. 

Smoking is a very "hot" subject. To try and 
set standards for the entire university, and 
trying to enforce those standards could cause 
more commotion than the effort is worth. 



The Current Sauce is published four times during the summer 
semester by the students of Northwestern State University of Louisi- 
ana. It is not associated with any of the university's departments and 
is financed independently. 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to the above 
address or brought to the office. Letters to the editor must include the 
author's classification and hometown, as well a telephone number 
where the writer can be reached. No anonymous letters will be 
printed, although names will be withheld on specific request from the 
author. The Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all correspon- 
dence. 

The deadline for all advertisements and copy is 3 p.m. the 
Thursday before publication. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

The Current Sauce is entered as second-class mail at Natchitoches, 
LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



Enforcing Northwestern f s 
Smoking Policy 




Readers' Forum 



Reach Out And Touch 
Someone - Like The Sauce 



The Current Sauce would like to 
introduce the new Readers' Forum, which is 
simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers 
a way for people to ask questions, express 
concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this 
feature, but we are also aware that this 
feature could be misused for the sole 
purpose of causing embarrassment and pain 
to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the 
feature to degenerate to the level of a gossip 
line nor will we allow it to become a political 
battle ground. Complaits and criticisms 
should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibity to hold the 
line on this matter, and we have determined 
that each call we receive will be formally 
evaluated by an editorial committee com- 
posed of editorial and staff. No "one" 



individual will edit the calls. 

We will evaluate the calls for potential to 
inspire improvement in any given area and 
then make a decision whether or not to publish 
it. Even if the call is not published, we may 
choose to do an independent followup on the 
matter. 

To leave a message, just call our number 
at 357-5456 between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. on 
weekdays and leave your name, classification, 
major, and message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers 
who requested an opportunity to voice com- 
ments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of 
our readers. Their participation will decide its 
place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers 
We are the caretakers. Our mission is to be 
responsive to our readers. 



18 June 25, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Conservative Corner 



The Big Green Misleads Us Again 



Plant a tree." Those three 
words have become the 
rallying cry of the Left and 
their cohorts. They want us 
to abandon jobs, lives, 
technologies all to protect 
the Earth. But their 
methods and their beliefs are mere 
hypocrisy. 

There seems to be many loopholes 
that are overlooked in this "new 
religion" of eco-terrorism. The general 
public is, at long last, beginning to take 
a more critical attitude toward the 
claims of such groups as Greenpeace 
and Earth First. The mass majority of 
environmental protester's are just Abbie 
Hoffman wanna be's whom of which 
have little knowledge of the truth. 

If one is to examine the heresy that 
1 Liberals seemed to dream up out of the 
bowels of idiocy on two of their biggest 
arguments, global warming and acid 
rain, one must question the sanity and 
credibility of such individuals. 

James Mahoney, the director of the 
Environmental Protection Agency's 
National Acid Precipitation Assessment 
project (NAPAP), testified before 
Congress that acid rain has had "no 
discernible effects on crops or forest 
yields." He said if no steps were taken 
to rectify the acid rain problem, the 
"chemical status of lakes would stay the 
same for the next 50 years" 

This indicates that the chemical 
status of lakes is not seriously effected 
by acid rain, meaning that the Liberal 
driven Clean Air Bill of President Bush, 
which plans to cut sulfur dioxide output, 
is nearly irrelevant and would cost the 
tax payers an estimated cost four to six 



billion dollars. The study also found that 
90 percent of the acidic lakes in New 
England were found to be acidic before 
1850 which for those with of us common 
sense realize this was prior to the 
Industrial Revolution in this country. 

Dr. Fred Singer, professor of 
Environmental Sciences at the University 
of Virginia and one of the men who found 
the whole in the ozone layer, in a letter to 
Policy Review suggested a solution to the 
problem: "sulfur dioxide removal not go 
beyond two to five million tons by 
extending controls to non-electric-utility 
sources and encouraging the phase-out of 
older, coal-fired powerplants." This means 
•nuclear power, the safest and 
cleanest energy source. This 
would reduce acid rain 
incredibly. 

Its time to threw 
down your "abolish 



[l global warming" 

signs because 

statistics have 

been released 
I that will make 

environmentalist's 
( tie dyed shirts 
i read "I love 
jj Nixon." 

Thomas Karl 

of the National 

Oceanographic 

and Atmospheric 

Administration 

stated in a study, 

"there is no / 

statistically j^sSW 1 J 

significant 

evidence of an 

overall increase in 




annual temperature or change annual 
precipitation for the 48 contiguous states 
from 1895 to 1987. 

In other words while the 
environmentalist are printing up their 
shirts that read "tree's are people, too" the 
polar ice caps are thickening not melting 
like they would wish us to believe. 

Another area of research that has 
been abused by the environmental 
movement and the Leftist media is 
recycling. Recycling can be counter- 
productive. It makes sense to recycle 
aluminum and ferrous metals, which are 
produced by the Earth and could possible 
become nonexistant, but 

recycling paper 
does not sense. 



r 

The 
bleaches used 
to de-ink 
newspapers 
during recycling 
are toxic and present 
their own 
environmental 
hazards. Plus, most 
paper comes from trees 
planted specifically for 
the purpose of printing. 
If the demand for 
recycled paper is 
reduced by forced 
recycling, less trees will 
be planted. So I guess 
/ it would be safe to 
assume that in the 
future we can look 
forward to Liberals 
chaining themselves to 
By Ivan MacDonald trees to protest the 



recycling of paper. 

The counter-productiveness of 
this new social activism is beyond 
reasoning. Earth First is responsible 
for two deaths to mill workers from 
the spiking of trees. One of the most 
terrifying occurrence was when an 
Earth First member placed a three 
month old baby in the path of a 
Bulldozer. They would waste a life to 
save a tree. 

Acts similar to these-sabotaging 
of equipment , chaining of people to 
trees, and the spiking of 
trees-accomplishes nothing except 
effecting the workers of the 
companies they claim to be 
protesting. 

We must ask ourselves if the 
integrity of these people is worth the 
shoe polish on their army boots. 
Their views have been heard and few 
are deserving of a thought. The 
American public will soon see 
through the picket signs, the 
burning flag, and the tie-dyed shirts 
to see the true meaning of such 
Leftist radical groups. 

They want us to believe it's the 
"in thing to do" and it's fun to do on 
acid, however I question not there 
motives, but there principle and 
veracity. There are many ways to 
assure that our children have a clean 
world to live, but the radical Left is 
ruining things with ecological 
anarchy, protesting and false facts 
and fabricated views. Drop the signs, 
extinguish the American flag, pedal 
your bikes to the unemployment 
agency, and get jobs and a life. ...the 
sixties are over. 



Current Quotes 

to 

Question: Do you think Northwestern should be smoke - free? 




Mike Batiste 

Political Science 

Marksville 

Sophomore 

I feel that a smoke-free campus would 
promote a healthier educational envi- 
ronment. It would encourage smokers 
and non-smokers to have a higher healtl i 
conscience about smoking. 




Alma Maldonado 

Political Science 
El 'Paso, TX. 
Junior 

Evten though I'm not a smoker, I pity those 
th^t do smoke. They do need their nico- 
tine, just like people that work in busi- 
nesses need coffee. If we had a smoke-free 
campus our grades would go down. 




Tracie Anderson 

Microbiology 

Many 

Junior 

I don't think they should be allowed to 
smoke in buildings. I hear so many people 
complain about how smoky Kyser Hall is. 




Lola Davis 

Journalism 
Alexandria 
Senior 

This is America, smokers have rights 
as well as non-smokers. There should 
be certain designated area for smok- 
ing in certain buildings. 



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BREAKFAST 










Large Breakfast 






3.25 




(Eggs, Bacon and Sausage or Toast) 






Sausage Biscuit 






.99 




Grilled Honey Bun 






.60 




Pancakes (2) 






2.10 




(With choice of Bacon or Sausage) 






LUNCH 


Reg. 


Lry. 


Dbl. 


Ifil 


Hamburger 


1.59 


1.79 


2.55 


3.75 


Cheeseburger 


1.69 


1.99 


2.75 


3.95 


Bacon C/Burger 


235 


2.65 


2.85 


4.25 


Fish Sandwich 


1.35 




2.10 




BBQ (Chipped Beef) 


1.80 








BL.T. 


1.75 








Homemade Meat Pies 


1.35 








Hot Dog 


.95 








Com Dog 


1.00 








Hot Link 


.95 








Chili Dog 


1.25 








Chicken Cheese Sand. 


155 








Roast Beef 


2.25 








Taco Salad 


3.49 








Ham-N-Cheese 


2.25 








Grilled Chicken Sand. 


1.95 








Ribeye Sandwich 


3.95 








Chef Salad 


3.25 








Steak Sandwich 


1.85 








Chicken Sandwich 


1.50 








Club Sandwich 


195 








Po Boy/ Ham or Beef 


2.50 








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Reg. 


Lrg. 




French Fries 




.70 


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Cajun Fries 




1.10 


115 




Onion Rings 




1.25 






Curly Q'j 




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Chili Fries 




1.75 






Chips 




.50 






Nachos 




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Baked Pot 




1.10 






Stuffed Pot 




1.85 







MEAL DEAIjfi Served with Choice of Salad. Fries or Baked Potato 

Kid's Meal i 99 

(Hamburger, fries, & Drink) 

Ribeye Dinner 4 95 

Meat Pie Dinner (2) 3 50 

Chicken Strip Dinner (3) 3 .50 

Catfish Dinner (2) 5 95 

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Burger Basket 3.50 

Shrimp Basket 3.95 

Steak Finger Basket (4) 3.50 

Pork Chop Dinner (2) 3.95 



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URREN 



SAUCE 



T i 



Columns 

Editor's Journal, p 5 
Guest Columnist, p 6 
From the Loker Room, p 12 



Northwestern Abroad, plO 



■ International Student Exchange 
Program 

■ New Director Named 



TheSummerSauce 



July 9, 1991 



The Summer Magazine of the Current Sauce 



Vol. 80, No. 3 



The Front Page 

Freshman 
Connection 
Helps 
Incoming 
Students 

KNWD 

Making 

Changes 

The Wooden 
Demon 



El 




r~couMTRv z£ 



Movie Review 

He's Back, P n 





Saluting 
the music 
of North 
Louisiana, 
P 8 




1940s Radio Hour Cast Announced, p 13 




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2 July 9, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



The Front Page 



Freshman Connection Helps Incoming Students 



by Leonard Williams, Staff Writer 

Anyone who can think back to their 
freshman year at Northwestern or any 
other university probably won't have 
fond memories. The dreaded freshman 
year is one of the biggest transitions in 
a teenagers life. The Freshman 
Connection Early Registration and 
Orientation Program was created to 
help ease that transition from high 
school to college. Already in its second 
year, university statistics show a 
dramatic increase in enrollment jointly 
from the Freshman Connection program 
and the Admissions department. 

Gail Jones, Freshman Connection 
director, has set many goals for the 
program and is certain they will be 
reached. 

"Not many people remember what 
it was like to be a freshman," says 
Jones, herself a graduate of 
Northwestern. 

The Freshman Connection program 
is broken into several parts to 
accommodate essentially a year's worth 



One student attending the first Freshman 

Connection a few weeks ago wrote a letter to 

Northwestern thanking the Freshman Connectors 
for making the transition from high school 
a lot smoother. 



of Orientation 101 into two days. 

"Now don't get me wrong, we can't 
show them everything about 
Northwestern, but we certainly try." 

The Parent's Orientation is an 
added feature to this year's program 

One of the major "links" in the 
program are the Freshman 
"Connectors". Twenty Northwestern 
students were chosen at the end of 
spring semester to work as the vital 
link between the university and the 
incoming student. The Connectors act 



KNWD General 
Manager Making 
Changes At Station 



by Van Reed, Editor 

KNWD, Northwestern 
State University's student 
run and operated radio 
station has undergone a 
change in management and 
with that change, the station 
has developed a "new idea of 
college radio." 

Jason Oldham, the FM 
station's general manager, is 
leading the station in a 
direction which he says the 
majority of the students at 
Northwestern will enjoy. 

"We try to play what our 
audience wants to hear," said 
Oldham. 

He added that this was 
accomplished through a 
variation of shows and music 
request disc jockies accept 
while on the air. 

Oldham said that the 
changes being made this 
summer will be carried over 
in the Fall semester along 
with other improvements to 
the station and its format. 

"We still play alternative, 
but we will be dominated by 
classic rock. We are adding 
several specialty shows." said 
Oldham 

The general manager 



added that these changes are 
to trying create a format that 
"everyone can tune into and 
listen to." 

Other programs being 
developed for the Fall include 
a sports talk show, expanded 
news and remodeling of South 
Hall, KNWD's home. 

Jon Terry, the station's 
music director, said in the 
Fall the station would try to 
improve itself by "going up in 
power and therefore, increase 
our listening audience 
greatly." 

Oldham said his first 
priority as general manager 
would be to make the station 
one that the majority of 
Northwestern could "call then- 
own." 

"We want to make it more 
than a bunch of college punks 
playing records, we want to 
make it a quality station." 

The general manager's 
staff includes Terry; Paul 
Aton, personnel director and 
Madelyn Boudreaux, 
alternative music director. 

Oldham was appointed to 
general manager by the 
Northwestern Media Board 
last May. 



as orientation leaders and peer advisers 
before the students actually see their 
advisers for the first time. 

The Connectors do the majority of 
the work and spend the most amount of 
time with the students. I may do some 
paperwork, but the Connectors are very 
important to the success of Freshman 
Connection." 

Jones and a committee of twenty 
faculty, staff, and administrators choose 
the connectors by way of interviews, 
grades and campus involvement. 



Not only will a Connector be a 
group leader, they will also serve as a 
peer counselor throughout the fall 
semester of a freshman's year. The 
Connector must prove that they are 
active in many parts of campus 
activities and also strong academically. 
The Connectors must emphasize 
academics and stress the importance of 
good grades during the fall semester of 
that first year. 

The participants of Freshman 
Connection are asked to evaluate the 
program and give comments and 
criticism. All of the almost 3000 
students attending Freshman 
Connection within the past two years 
have had positive thing to say about the 
impact of Freshman Connection on 
their first semester at Northwestern. 

One student attending the first 
Freshman Connection a few weeks ago 
wrote a letter to Northwestern thanking 
the Freshman Connectors for making 
the transition from high school a lot 
smoother. 




This giant wooden Demon made its permanent home on the second floor of the 
Student Union last week. The Demon was carved by chain-saw from a tree by a company 
in California. The Demon is said to weigh 2000 pounds. 



TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 3 



News in Brief 



Giant Garage Sale and Flea 
Market 

The Northwestern Campus ! 
Women's Club is sponsoring a 
giant garage sale and flea 
market August 3, in Prather 
Coliseum. 

Organizations, individuals, 
church groups, businesses and 
other groups may rent a 12X12 
space to sell arts and crafts, 
household items, food, clothing, 
garden supplies, plants, toys, 
books, records or any other 
items. Each space will rent for 
$25 and eight foot folding 
tables are available upon 
request for $5. Deadline for 
space rental is July 19. Spaces 
need to be rented as soon as 
possible. 

Admission to the garage 
sale and flea market is $1. 
Children under 12 are 
admitted free. 

For more information on 
obtaining space call 357-5611. 

Library Alumni holds 
luncheon 

The Northwestern Library 
Alumni, a library science 
alumni group, will hold its 
annual luncheon meeting 
Tuesday, July 10, at 11 a.m. in 
the Sylvan Friedman Student 
Union on the Northwestern 
campus. The lunch will be 



sponsored by the NSU 
Foundation. 

Elise James, 
Northwestern 's Director of 
Alumni Affairs and 
Development, will be the guest 
speaker. 

At the meeting the Library 
Alumni will elect officers and 
plan a gathering to be held at 
Homecoming in October. 

1940's Radio Hour needs 
help 

The Northwestern Theatre 
is seeking donations or loans of 
1940s era clothing for the 
production of 1940's Radio 
Hour. 

Donations or loans of any 
clothing of the area including 
but not limited to military 
uniforms, cocktail dresses, 
coats, etc. are needed. 

"We need to acquire 
clothing from that era to help \ 
us to get thf desired 
authenticity for the 
production," said Dr. Jack 
Warm, Northwestern artistic 
director. 

1940's Radio Hour will be 
done in the dinner theatre 
format. The show will be 
performed July 18-20 and July 
26-28 in the Alley located in 
the Friedman Student Union. 
Dinner will be served at 6:45 



p.m. with the curtain at 8 p.m. 

Tickets are $14 for both 
dinner and the show. For more 
information, contact the 
Northwestern Theatre box 
office at 357-5819. 

Freshman Connection 

The second of four summer 
Freshman Connection sessions 
is set to begin Thursday. 

Two other sessions are set 
for July 15-16 and July 25-26 
on Northwestern's campus. 

The cost of the program is 
$60. For more information on 
Freshman Connection 1991, 
contact Gail Jones at (318) 357- 
5901. 

Overexposure could cause 
skin cancer 

This summer the American 
Cancer Society encourages the 
public to protect themselves 
from overexposure to the sun. 

Skin cancer is linked to 
excessive exposure to the sun, 
and can be largely prevented 
with simple precautions, said 
Dr. Patricia Farris, 
dermatologist and chairman of 
the American Cancer Society's 
Greater New Orleans Public 
Education Committee. 

"People who spend a lot of 
time outdoors should be 
examined by a dermatologist if 



they notice any sores or moles 
that do not seem to be healing 
or that tend to bleed," said 
Farris. 

The sun's ultraviolet rays 
are strongest between 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

"Exposure at these times 
! should be avoided, and 
protective clothing should be 
worn," she added. 

Sunscreens should be used 
having an SPF (sun protection 
factor) of at least 15 or more. 
Farris said sunscreens should 
be applied before going out in 
the sun and needs to be 
reapplied after activity. 

For more information on 
types of skin cancer, how to tell 
if you have skin cancer, or how 
it is prevented, call your local 
American Cancer Society office 
or call 1-800-ACS-2345. 

Sigma Kappa Wins National 
Awards 

Monica Billiot and Louisa 
Bruch, president and scholar- 
ship chairman of Sigma Kappa, 
attended the National College 
Officer Training School (COTS) 
at the University of Maryland 
from June 20-23. 

The training school, "Sigma 
Kappa... Weaving the Tapes- 
| try", provided the opportunity 
I for approximately 400 Sigma 



Kappa members to attend 
! representing 120 collegiate 
chapters. 

One award presented to 
Northwestern's Delta Mu 
chapter was for Scholastic 
Commendation. Overall GPA 
and the academic program of 
the chapter went into consider- 
ation for the award. The 
chapter has the highest 
sorority GPA on NSUs campus 
due to its scholastic program. 

Delta Mu chapter also 
received the 100 Percent 
Reporting award in recognition 
of reporting promptly to 
national and regional offices. 
The Distinguished Advisor 
Award went to alumnus Pam 
Crook for her aid in the 
chapter. 

During the conference, 
Collegians, alumnae, and 
national officers participated in 
j workshops to strengthen 
leadership skills, academic 
goals, and promote social 
awareness. 

Other awards were pre- 
sented in recognition of 
outstanding collegiate chapter 
performance in academics, 
philanthropic contributions, 
public relations, alumnae 
j relations, membership recruit- 
j ment, and overall chapter 
! excellence. 




This summer, seatbelt laws are being enforced. 
So buckle up. Or you might break more than the law. 
And that would be the biggest bummer of all. 

Buckle Up 



4 July 9, 1991 



TheSummerSauce 



Editor's Journal 



Society Needs A 
Booster-Shot 



By allowing these organizations to go coed we are 
destroying our first amendment rights to the freedom of 
assemble and we are teaching our children to become 
spoiled brats and to solve everything by taking it to court. 

Our country was founded on the philosophy that majority 
rules. If we allow one person to change a whole 
organization, then we destroy the philosophy that this 
country was built upon. 
In Chicago, Mark Welsh, an 8-year-old boy, wants to join the 
Cub Scouts. The Scouts won't let him because he is an atheist. 

I quote the Boy Scout Oath, "On my honor, I will do my best 
to God and my country..." I need not go any further. I quote the 
Boy Scout Laws, "A scout is trustworthy... brave, clean and 
reverent." 

The whole foundation of being a scout is believing in God. 
There are religious awards for scouts and there are chaplain 
positions in the troops. Lord Baden-Powell founded this 
organization to do duty to country and to God. 

But again this problem goes back to the parents. When you 

are eight years old, you don't 



If our courts allow these monstrosities to 
happen, what will be next? 



Society needs a 
booster-shot of reality. 
American society has 
been growing further 
and further away from 
reality each day, and 
people seem to sit back and watch it all happen. 
Case in point, the Boy Scouts of America. 
This 81-year-old American institution has come 
under fire for not allowing women and atheists to join. 

Margo Mankes, an eight year-old girl wants to attend 
summer camp. She wants to join the Cub Scouts so she can go to 
camp. I know what you are about to ask: Margo, why don't you 
join the Girl Scouts and go with them to summer camp? I asked 
the same question. It seems she does not like the way things are 
done in the Girl Scouts and wants to do the things the boys do. 
So, she's going to court. 

Come on! There are so many things wrong with this it hurts. 
What does an eight year-old girl know about going to court. Her 
parents are doing this. More than likely this is a spoiled child 
who has gotten everything she has ever wanted. Now she wants 
to be a Cub Scout. Her parents are not going to allow this 
organization to tell their little baby girl she cannot enter, so 
they've taken them to court. 

These organizations were set up to be separate. If not we 
would probably have just the Scouts of America. If we allow new 
rules to be made to open these organizations up to members of the 
opposite sex then we need to change its 

name to the Scouts of Communist . , _ T 1 1 

America by Van Rodney Reed 



decide to be Catholic, 
Episcopal, or Baptist or for that 
matter atheist. You belong to 
the religion of your parents. 

But wait there's more! 
It seems Mark's father has 
sued another organization that was God-oriented and won. He 
won money. This whole issue is over money. He wants more of it. 
But wait! Look at the back of a one dollar bill, a five dollar bill, a 
dime, a penny or any U.S. currency. What do you see? "In God 
we trust." 

It looks like Mark's father will have to accept his cash in 
rubles instead of dollars. Poor man, I guess hell sue the United 
States next. 

I have come up with a solution for both of these cases. In 
Margo's case, the parents should wake up and smell the money 
their wasting on this court case. Instead of trying to get the 
courts to get you into the Cub Scouts, talk with Girl Scout officials 
are see if they will change the programs they offer to be more like 
the Boy Scout system. If not, live with it. 

In Mark's case, his parents want him to join. If you don't 
believe in God, why join an institution that is based on religion. If 
you believe in abortions, don't join Right to Life. If you believe in 
unions, don't join National Right to Work. If you believe in 
destroying the rain forest, don't join Greenpeace. See a pattern 
forming here? 

The kids are not to blame here, their parents are. Both are 
money and fame hungry. If our courts 
allow these monstrosities to happen, 



what will be next? 



The 
Summer 
Sauce 



Published every other week 
during the summer by the 
students of Northwestern 
State University 



Van Reed, Editor 
Jon Terry, Sports Editor 
LeonardWilliams. Staff 
Judy Francis. Staff 
Jason Oldham, Staff 
Damian Domingue, Staff 
Brian Shirley, Staff 
Russ Harris, Artist 
Chris Young, Photographer 
Eben Cook, Advertising 
Tom Whitehead, Adviser 



How to Reach 
TheSummer Sauce, 

(318)357-5456 Student 
Publications Office 

(318) 357-5096 Editor's Office 

(318) 357-5456 Advertising 

(318) 357-5213 Adviser's 
Office 

(318)357-6564 Fax # 

225 Kyser Hall 
P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches. LA 71497. 



Mayor Joe Sampite, "I f Natchitoches & Northwestern 



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TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 5 




Guest Columnist 



Why share 
same sky? 



The other night I looked out of the window and saw 
something I never really noticed before, a beautiful 
black sky. I ve never been much of a stargazer, but 
there was something amazing about the sky on this 
particular night. There were absolutely no stars in 
sight, no glare from the moon, lust a plain flawless 
black sky. It appeared to be endless, stretching its' 
arms around all mankind. 
If we all have absolutely nothing else in 
common, one thing is for sure, we all live under the same 
beautiful sky. I often wonder if people will ever accept this fact. 
Some of us strive to be separate, but it will take an awful lot of 
technological advances to overcome this one. Lets' face it, some 
things we just have to except. 

A few days ago, I.was in one of the largest cities in a 
neighboring state. A report came on television that a resident 
had been shot to his death after getting off work late Friday 
evening. 

A Black male was sitting in the back of a truck drinking 
beers. He just so happened to be with three of his Caucasian 
working associates. Three other Caucasian 

males — "skinheads" — decided it was by JeiTy 




imperative that they end this unacceptable gathering. So, 
they killed the Black man. 

What is wrong with people today? What is it going to 
take to make them realize that we cannot be separated? 
The same sky that I gazed at is the exact same sky that 
rests above the heads of those guys that killed that man. 
And whether we like it or not, it is a fact, we have to live 
here together. 

Recently I visited a friend that spoke about a night when 
she and four of her friends were strolling back to their residence 
v/hen she noticed a somewhat strange transpiration in the sky 
She said that the clouds had arranged themselves in the shape of 
an outstretched hand with four fingers and one thumb. After 
pointing the figure out to the others, she found herself standing 
alone. 

I suppose one could say she was like the thumb in the 
sky that night, separated from the rest. The others allowed their 
minds to limit their thinking. Perhaps that sounds a bit 
contradicting, but it is the absolute truth. They allowed their 
minds to limit what they saw and immediately fear turned the 
image into something negative. The others ran. 

Fear works on the human mind in this manor. If we 
don't understand something, our immediate reaction is to find a 
way to escape, find a way to destroy, and finally we seek 
knowledge. 

This holds true when it comes to each other. Rather than 
attempting to understand each other, we try to find a means of 
escaping, a means of dividing, a means of ranking. In doing this 
we find no truth. Perhaps a temporary solution, yet nothing 
lasting. 

I personally find people, if nothing else, entertaining I 
would much rather talk to a "skinhead" or even Minister Louis 
Farrakhan just to see exactly what is it that makes them tick. 
What is it that makes them hate the way they do? Perhaps if we 
find out where the problem stems from, then we can seek a 
solution. But continuous tongue lashing and senseless killings 
will do nothing, but make the hatred worse. 

In the words of Albert Einstein, "The man who regards 
his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not 
merely unhappy but hardly fit for life." 

Roberson 



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6 July 9, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Financial Aid Update 



Financial Aid 




his office is 
currently 
processing aid for 
the Fall Semester. 
The procedure is as 
follows: 



Financial Aid Notification Letter. At this point, the process 
is complete. 

The Notification Letter will inform you as to how 
much aid you will receive for the Fall and Spring 
semesters. 

Questions will be answered 

Beginning Monday, July 8, students who have 
questions are encouraged to see a counselor in our office at 
the following times: 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Before 12:00 noon 

Tuesday, Thursday All Day 



Our office is currently processing aid for 
the Fall Semester. 



■ Once all forms are turned into our office, 
your folder is considered complete. 

■ At this point, the verification process is performed 
on information included on the Student Aid Report. 

■ Once complete, the awarding process begins in the 
order the folders are completed. 



■ After the awarding process, 
the student will receive their 



If the preceding 
times are not convenient, 
you will need to make an 
appointment. This schedule 
is being arranged in an 
effort to make sure all aid 
will be processed and 
completed for the Fall 
semester. We ask for your patience during this extremely 
busy time of year. 

If you have any questions or need to make an 
appointment to see me or any counselors call us at 357- 
5961 or come see us in Roy Hall. 



Craig Polemanse's Financial Aid Update will be a 
regular column in the Current Sauce. Each week, the Sauce 
will keep you up to date with your 

by Craig Poleman Financial Aid. 



COUCH 

POTATO 

PARTY 

IN THE ALLEY 
TUES. JUNE 18 

7:00 p.m. 
Pacific 
Heights 

9:00 p.m. 

Pump Up 
The Volume 

FREE FOOD 
FREE COKES 

BE A COUCH 
POTATO! 



MeMaw's 
Restaurant 

22 1 Texas Street 

Natchitoches, LA 
Open 6 a.m. to 3p.m. 

352-7477 

Breakfast & Lunch Specials Served Dally 




NAVY 

You and the Navy. 
Full Speed Ahead. 




Navy Recruiting Station 
121 Royal Street 
Natchitoches, LA 71457-5019 
(318) 352-5757 



Thai? mr> mrSaucc :>\{; '<»9l 



last in a series 



The 1991 Folk Festival 

Saluting the Music of North Louisiana 




COUOTRV ~~ 




The Natchitoches- 
Northwestern 
Folk Festival will 
kick off July 19-20 
in Prather 
Coliseum with 
plenty of foot- 
stompin' music, 
tasty food, wonderful crafts. 

Participants of the Folk 
Festival will experience 
Louisiana music at its best 

fcr "BLUES R AS S~3 starting Saturda y ni g ht 

t^- -mij*i l^-> with a concert and dance. 

Saturday's show will 
headline all-time favorite, 
Hadley Castille. Castille 
returns to the Festival after 
a five year absence. 

But the Festival salutes 
the music of North 
Louisiana. So area artist 
will be on-stage playing the 
fiddle and strumming the 
CqymWZ| banjos. 

For the first time, The 
Folk Festival will include 
the Chaplin's Lake 
Bluegrass Festival. 

Louisiana does not have 
an annual bluegrass festival 
and the bluegrass 
enthusiasts are hopeful that 
this will become an annual 
affair. 

The rich heritage of music 
in Louisiana is as varied as the 
people who populate the state 
and this Folk Festival will 
serve a little of as many 
different kinds as possible 
giving those who attend a taste 
of each. 

Along with the music will be 
the opportunity to learn to 

mW*»tfw<<ta 1 <ti < & ace to the soun ds of 
MjmmHvf^hti'\^ m - Louisiana as Randy 

' &&4i^m*m and Cynthia 

!'&\{ Speyrer teach 
ftlik^ three full 




;FrocK-m- Roll 

— TI 




sessions of Cajun Dance on 
Saturday on the Main Arena 
Floor. 

Those who were 
disappointed Friday night 
because they didn't know how 
to dance to the music of Preston 
Frank and the Zydeco Family 
Band and Ruble Wright and the 
Wright Beats, will have the 
opportunity to try on Saturday 
night to the music of Billy 




UN 

iiiMSp 1 



swii \.^/^/i'i!^«»'l |w ^i 



III,.- 'ilM-jiHul, /w«fj,;Tt'.t ;t ,ir j (^(((<^ W ''"' 



Billy Wester, Fiddle Maker and Collector 

O'Con and the Convicts and the 
ever popular Castille & Cajun 
i Grass. 

If dancing isn't your favorite 
activity there will be a 
multitude of other activities to 
choose from. 

Exhibits of all types of arts 
and crafts will be on the center 
floor of the Coliseum and will 
present various traditional crafts 
reflecting the many cultures of 
Louisiana. 

Dave McLain from Pineville 
make his second appearance at 
the Festival demonstrating the 
ancient art of flint knapping. 

McLain is one of 



the growing number of new crafts 
people who have mastered the 
ancient art of flint knapping - the 
technique of chipping stone tools. 

Collette Schexnayder will be 
on hand with her soft dolls. 

Schexnayder has made dolls 
and other sewing crafts since 
childhood. She will also conduct 
a workshop on dolls and jointed 
teddy bear making in the Kid 
Fest area, in front of Prather 

Coliseum. 

Lee Allen Ward, a 36 year old 
carpenter from Cloutierville, 
Louisiana, splits cypress 
boards and shingles by hand 
from centuries old logs which 
he finds in the bed of Sang 
Pour Sang Lake, an old rim 
lake which has been drained 
to create a swampy area now 
called Hell's Brake. Cypress 
logs from the Sang Pour Sang/ 
Hell's Brake area have been 
used by many generations of 
craftsmen. 

This tradition continues 
through Mr. Ward because it 
serves the same practical 
purpose as in years past. He 
uses the shingles to roof his 
outbuildings and the pickets 
to fence his one-acre yard. 
Much more is on the agenda 
including activities for the 
children at their very own Kid 
Fest '91. 

This is history at its best. 
Helping us to learn about our 
past while enjoying the present 
seems to be the goal of Dr. Don 
Hatley of the Northwestern 
Folklife Center and his staff 
who work diligently to enrich 
our lives with the knowledge of 
our heritage. 

So get out your dancing 
shoes or your tapping toes and 
come on down to the banks of 
Beautiful Chaplin Lake for a 
fun filled weekend of the 
sounds, sights, and tastes of 
Louisiana. 



8 July 9, 1991 TheSummerSauce 




PRATHER COLISEUM 

reformers' 



NORTH 



HONKY 
TONK 
STAGE 



FOOD 



Entrance 



DANCE FLOOR 



Louisiana 
Folklife Center 
Staff 



Souvenirs 
CRAFTS 



FESTIVAL SECURITY I I 
ir EMERGENCY 1 1 



INFO | 1 

RDDTH I 1 



Participant 

Dressing 

Area 







■i 








FRONT 




PORCH 




STAGE 



FOOD 



□ 



N CLUB 
ROOM 




Guitar Maker Ron Richardson 
(top) will be just on of the many 
exhibits at the Folk Festival. 

Younger Steward of Robeline 
(left) will be among the perforers at 
Kid Fest '91. 



TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 9 



r 



Features 



Northwestern Abroad and ISEP 

International Exchange Programs Allow Students The Opportunity to Study Abroad 



/ / A study abroad 
It A experience should 
% \ J ■ be a basic 

I ■ component of 
LJk nearly any degree 

/ ■ program because 
costs are 
reasonable and 
eligible for financial aid 
programs," cited Tom 
Whitehead, the newly-appointed 
Acting Director of Northwestern 
Abroad in discussing plans for 
his office. 

"Even the additional costs of 
transportation and personal 
expenses can be added to the 
amount of financial aid in some 
cases," added Whitehead. 

The office located in Room 
103 Kyser has several functions. 
One is to coordinate student 
study abroad placements in 
conjunction with the ISEP 
(International Student 
Exchange Program) located at 



Georgetown University and 
partially funded by the United 
State Information Agency. 

Also the Northwestern 
Abroad office will be planning 
programs for Northwestern 
students to have residential 
study experiences in foreign 
countries under the direct 
sponsorship of the university. 

Previous study programs 



Shows will be at the 
Universidad de Santiago de 
Compostela in Spain. Marcus 
Jones has been placed at 
Polytechnic South West in 
Plymouth, England. Marny 
Stein has an exchange 
placement at the State 
University of Utrecht in the 
Netherlands. Rich Shaffer spent 
the 1990-91 year at the Utrecht 



With the world becoming smaller and our 
lives so interwoven in a global village 

concept, a study abroad experience seems 
like it should just be a natural part of 
higher education. 



M ADC IN U S A 



have included trips to Spain, 
Mexico, England and Wales. 

Thirdly a program for 
faculty-staff exchanges with 
foreign universities is being 
proposed at this time. 

The university has been a 
member of ISEP since 1983 
which allows for Northwestern 
students to study at nearly 100 
foreign member institutions 
while the students from those 
schools can study at any of the 
90 US member schools. 

Three Northwestern 
students will be 
participating in 
ISEP next 
academic 




institution, and Paul Sonnier is 
completing a year at the 
Catholic University of Nijmegen 
in the Netherlands. 

Two foreign students were at 
Northwestern during the Spring 
— Jerome Perrault of France 
studying Journalism and Andre 
Farret of England majoring in 
Psychology. 

Laurent Charrier is planning on 
coming here this fall from 
France to study history. 

"Our association with 
ISEP allows us to 
individualize a 
student's 



area of study with a foreign 
institution offering that 
expertise. Also the costs are the 
same as attending Northwester! 
except for insurance, travel and 
personal expenses." noted 
Whitehead in describing this 
program. 

"Our goal is also to develop 
programs at foreign sites to 
enable our students to 
participate in study experiences 
under the direct supervision of 
Northwestern." continued 
Whitehead 

Information on the ISEP, 
other study programs and the 
faculty-staff exchanges can be 
obtained from Whitehead in 
Room 103 Keyser or at 357- 
5213. 

"With the world becoming 
smaller and our lives so 
interwoven in a global village 
concept, a study abroad 
experience seems like it should 
just be a natural part of higher 
education," reflected Whitehead 
in an overview of the philosopW 
of his office. 



10 July 9, 1991 




Movie Review 



He's Back! 





Even if you don't like 
science fiction or even 
futuristic type movies, 
you'll get behind 
Terminator II. This 
sequel to the 1984 smash 
hit starring Arnold 
Schwarzzeneger and 
Linda Hamilton is touted as being 
the most expensive film ever made. 
Unbelievable. 

Terminator II starts off 
pretty close to where the original 
left off. Sarah Conner (Hamilton) 
has been committed to a 
psychiatric prison because of her 
"delusions" of cold-blooded killers 
from the future that have come 

back to kill her. The cold-blooded killers are cybernetic warriors with one 
program, terminate. The Terminator (Schwarzzeneger) has been rebuilt 
and sent back to protect Sarah Conner's child who will be a major force in 
the future war against the computers. Unfortunately, the computers have 
sent one of their own, an advanced Terminator: a T-1000 to kill Conner's 
child, and this guy does not play around. 

The Terminator II or T-1000 (Robert Patrick) is made of "liquid 
metal," enabling him to transform into any shape that he touches. The 
suspense of trying to figure out what he will be next is one of the 
highlights of the film. The effects used in the T-1000 
sequences are some of the same computer technology 

that created effects for The Abyss. Included in the 1 t j tttj iv 

over 150 visual effects are some that are the most D J l^eOliarCl W llliamS 



The Terminator, scientist Miles Dyson and Sarah Connor break into a hi-tech facility in 
Terminator II, Judgement Day. 



extensive in movie history. 

The money spent on the movie was well worth it, yet even minimal 
movie goers will notice that a few of the effects fall short of looking 
real, such as Los Angeles blowing up in a nuclear holocaust. The 
premise is believable, but the little "paper mache" buildings don't 
look that real These are all technicalities that shouldn't detract 
from the overall movie. The movie was a bit long with a running 
time of approximately 2 hours, but the development of the plot makes that 
time feel like nothing. 

The audience reaction to the movie was favorable. It is not a horror 
movie, yet there are certain scenes that made people a little squeamish. 

The transformation of the T-1000 
made many people in the audience 
grown a little, but it wasn't a 
Nightmare on Elm Street special. 
Overall this movie showed what a 
sequel should be like. Not just a 
continuation of a person's life 
fighting another bully or trying to 
kill another shark or even trying to 
find another lost treasure. There is 
definite plot development in this 
movie. 

When a moviegoer leaves a 
screening of a sequel, they should 
either 

■ Run to the video rental store and 
rent the previous movie or 

■ Go home and wait for the next 



highly publicized movie to roll into town. 

It is refreshing to see a sequel that requires the viewer in some way 
to know what the story is about without a recount by the characters in the 
movie. Terminator II does that. It allows those people who have seen the 
original to pickup where it left off and let those who have not seen the 
original "catch on a little later." 

There are a few moral issues involved in the movie as far as the 
human race killing each other off, but it's not like sitting in Psycholop y 
101. Most importantly in the movie The Terminator is instructed not to kill 

anyone, and he keeps his promise. In some small, 
way it seems as though Arnold Schwarzenegger is 
saying "I can make a picture without killing 
everyone." 



Mon , wed SCHWARZENEGGER 

Fri. 7:00 
&9:30 
lues., Thurs. 

€ui JUDGMENT DM 



TERMINr\TDR 2 



A TRt'S TAR RELEASE 





Robin 
Hood 



Mon., Wed. 
Fri. 7:00 
& 9:00 
Tues., Thurs.,| 
Sat., Sun. 



m PRINCE OF THIEVES 2:oo,4:oo, 

flJl « i=rs 7:00,9:00 



WARNER BROS 




1011 KeyserAve. 
352-5109 




Mon., Wed., 
Fri. 7:00 
& 9:00 
Tues., Thurs., 
Sat, Sun. 
2:00, 4:00, 
7:00, 9:00 



RPCutTEtB 

> v A -BLAST Of f UN! 




BILL 
CAMPBELL 

(C) 11.1 WtH ■ .. 



Has 




Mon.. Wed., 

Fri. 7:15 
Tues., Thurs., 
Sat., Sun. 
2:15,4:15 




BILLY CRYSTAL Mon Wed ; 

. Fri. 9:00 

3 ' Tues., Thur- 

Sat., Sun. Ill 
7:00, 9:00 ■ 



Suckers 




■hi 



COLUMBIA pictude:, 



TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 11 



Do 

something 
good. 

Feel 

something 
real. 



From the Locker Room 



The Sauce's 
Super Sports 




the joys of 
summer. Rest, 
relaxation, lazy days 
and little to no 
responsibility. But 
it's already July, and 



From now on in Americo, ony definition 
of o successful life musf include serving 
ofa. lo find oui how you con neb in 
/our community coll 1 (800) 677-5515. 

O Points of Light 
FOUNDATION 



Othe summer is passing quickly. Before you know it, 
fall will be here, and that means school. 
But you're in luck, because with the advent of the 
fall semester comes the return of the regular weekly Current 
Sauce. For you sports fans, this will be an especially enjoyable 
treat, because the Sauce has entered a new era of sports coverage. 
And all just for you. 

Under the excited leadership of Sauce Editor Van Reed and 
myself, the new Sports Editor, this paper has now begun a policy of 
complete, total and creative sports coverage. And you, as the 
Northwestern sports fan, are definitely in for a treat, as you are 
about to witness the most extensive Northwestern sports coverage 
of your college career. 

And what more perfect time. With 
Southland Conference champion Softball 



and baseball teams, a continued streak of track All- 
Americans and Northwestern 's first softball and academic 
All-Americans, Northwestern is continually in the news. 
With continued controversy in the basketball program and 
the second-largest number of active professional football 
players of any Division I-AA school, Northwestern is 
continually flashing into the national spotlight. And the 
Sauce is going to bring all this strait to you, weekly, and 
better"than ever before. 

Starting with the first fall issue, you — as the sports fan — can 
expect to see a larger, more detailed sports section, covering all 
actions in all sports. No longer will one sport be more important 
than another due to a lack of space. A minimum of one full page, 
complete with pictures, statistics and visuals will await your full 
attention in every issue. Football, basketball, volleyball, and 
cross country will be completely covered in the fall, along with 
updates on the other sports. And in the spring, baseball, softball, 
tennis, golf, and indoor and outdoor track will be fully covered. 
Not to mention this weekly column. 

Put simply, Demon sports fans 



The Sauce has entered a new era in sports 
coverage for the 1991-92 school year. 



will finally have the full scoop, 
will at last receive the 
dedication and commitment 
that they and the Demons 
themselves deserve from the 
school paper. And that is 

what's important. 

As I just said, this isn't just for the fans either. At the 
Current Sauce, we realize that these student athletes are all 
working very hard, and no matter what sport they play, they are 
working equally hard to get the job done. Just one more reason 
why an equal-coverage policy is so important. 

A new school year is about to begin, and with it will come a 
new Current Sauce. So just sit back and enjoy. 



For all of you avid fishermen like myself, don't forget that 1990-1991 
licenses expired on June 30. So if you want to go drop a line in your 

favorite hole, don't forget to go pick up a new 
- _ _ license. After all, a responsible sportsman 

by J on 1 erry >» s '«*°" v 







Our dedication to see to 
it that Northwestern 
Sports is covered 
completely has led us to 

create 



SUP 

SPORTS 





- This Fall in the - 

Current Sauce 



12 July 9, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Features 



Northwestern Dinner Theatre Cast Announced 



The cast for the North- 
western State University's 
Summer Dinner Theatre 
production of 1940's Radio 
Hour has been announced by 
artistic director Dr. Jack 
Wann. 

The cast consists of both 
Northwestern students and 
non-students from Natch- 
itoches and the surrounding 
area. 

"We got a good mix in our 
cast," Wann said. "We wanted 
to use students who were in 
summer school but we also 
wanted to bring in people from 
the community.'' 

Jenny Kendrick, a 14-year- 
old ninth grader at the Natch- 
itoches Ninth Grade Center is 
one community member who 
proved she could perform the 
role of 17-year-old Connie 
Miller in the production. 

"Jenny really impressed 
us. She's very mature and 
given the innocence of the 
1940's, her age parallels a 16 or 
17-year-old in 1942 when the 



play is set," Wann said. 
"She's cute and perky 
and has got a lot of 
bounce and that 
describes Connie 
Miller, who shell 
play." 

Kendrick has 
wanted to act since she 
was a young child and 
decided to take a shot 
at being in 1940's 
Radio Hour. 

"It's neat. Its 
different to work with 
adults and be with 
them and be treated as 
one," Kendrick said. 
"Everyone else didn't 
know how to treat me 
at first but now I'm one 
of the gang." 

Other cast 
members include Todd 
Dupree as Pops Bailey, 
Lynn Gilcrease as 
Rosie, Tony Arieux as 
Clifton Feddington, 
Jeff Pappas as Zoot 
Doubleman, Ryan 




Butler as Wally 
Fergusson, Faron 
Raborn as Lou Colin, 
Dale Higginbotham 
as Johnny Cantone, 
Cala Raborn as 
Ginger Brooks, 
Damian Domingue 
as B.J. Gibson, 
Kent LaBorde as 
Neal Tilden, Patty 
Breckenridge as 
Ann Collier, Vicki 
Parrish as Geneva 
Lee Browne and 
Ronald Johnnie as 
Biff Baker. 

Orchestra 
members include 
Job T. Cannon as 
Neeley "Flaps" 
Kovacks, Joe 
Williams as "Scoops" 
Millard, Eric Urena 
as Fritz Canigliaro, 
Mike Rowley as Ned 
"Woof Bennett, 
Kristine Hufman as 
"Snookie" Davenport 
along with Pappas 



and Johnnie. 

Wann is the director, 
Vernon Carroll is the designer 
and technical director. Pappas 
is the musical director while 
Faron Raborn is the assistant 
musical director. Parrish is the 
choreographer and Gilcrease is 
the assistant director and stage 
manager. 

1940's Radio Hour will be 
done in a dinner theatre 
format. The show will be 
performed July 18-20 and July 
26-28 in the Alley located in 
the Friedman Student Union. 
Dinner will be at 6:45 p.m. 
with the curtain at 8 p.m 

Tickets are $ 1 4 for both 
dinner and the show. The 
dinner will consist of three 
entrees, five vegetables, diverse 
salads and dessert. 

For more information or to 
order tickets, contact the 
Northwestern box office at 357- 
5819. 

■ 

The Sauce will review the 1940 s 
Radio Hour in the next issue 



All Tank Tops 





Sale July 8 Thru July 17 

Check Out The New Arrivals! 

University Bookstore 



/ N 



THE 



STUDENT 
7:30-4:30 Monday — Friday 



UNION 



TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 13 



Editoral Page 



TheSummerSauce 



EDITORIAL 



The Good, The Bad 
And The Ugly 

The Good 
The Natchitoches-Northwestern Folk Festival 
could be seen by some as boring, by others 
fascinating, but the Sauce sees it as one of the best 
things to happening at this university each year. 
The Folk Festival, coordinated by the NSU Folk 
Life Center directed by Dr. Don Hatley, is an event that 
promotes a truly positive image for Northwestern. 

The Festival each year draws big names to preform, 
like this year's returning star, Hadley Castille. And with 
that big names comes lots of people. And lots of people 
means lots of money. And money is always good. 

Support for the Festival should be top priority. This 
festival is recognized nationally, and with the university — 
students, staff, faculty — behind it this festival can grow 
and become the biggest thing in North Louisiana besides 
the Christmas Festival. 

Students, Faculty, Staff, attend the Folk Festival. 

The Bad 

The Louisiana Legislature wasted another year of our 
lives not to mention plenty of our money. Our lawmakers 
did succeed in overriding the governors veto of the abortion 
bill, but they messed around with our budget until some 8 
days after the end of the fiscal year. 

But there is more. They also banned a Texas-brewed 
beer from being sold in Louisiana. Why? Because Texas 
banned Dixie beer's new brew, Voodoo Brew. Now children 
you are getting paid for your jobs in Baton Rouge. Will we 
have to take away your pay checks to stop you from 
fighting over Texas's beer? 

The Ugly 

The 2-ton wooden Demon in the Student Union has 
caused much outraged about its cost and the exact purpose 
of it. This carved tree was purchased recently to promote 
school spirit. 

The Demon could do just that. And this could be good 
for the university. So, why did was it honored with the title I 
of The Ugly? Take a second look at it. 



The Current Sauce is published four times during the summer 
semester by the students of Northwestern State University of Louisi- 
ana. It is not associated with any of the university's departments and 
is financed independently. 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to the above 
address or brought to the office. Letters to the editor must include the 
author's classification and hometown, as well a telephone number 
where the writer can be reached. No anonymous letters will be 
printed, although names will be withheld on specific request from the 
author. The Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all correspon- 
dence. 

The deadline for all advertisements and copy is 3 pan. the 
Thursday before publication. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

The Current Sauce is entered as second-class mail at Natchitoches, 
LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



14 July 9, 1991 TheSummerSauce 




Smoking Policy Must Be Total Ban 



Dear Editor, 

I was very pleased to 
see the article concerning 
the SGA's attempt to ban 
smoking in some areas of 
our campus. The dangers of 
smoking are well 
documented, and most 
thinking people agree that 
smoking increases the 
incidence of many diseases. 
What many people do not 
realize is that second hand 
smoke is more dangerous 
than the primary smoke 
that smokers inhale. Even 
more toxic is the smoke 
which "curls gracefully" 
from the end of lit 
cigarettes. 

The Environmental 
Protection Agency declared 
secondhand smoke a "Group 
A carcinogen" in 1990. This 
report stated that thousands 
of nonsmokers die of lung 
cancer each year as a result 



of secondhand tobacco smoke. 
Tobacco smoke contains over 
4000 chemical compounds, over 
40 of which are known . 
carcinogens. I can be jailed for 
burning leaves in my backyard, 
but smokers can light up 
almost anywhere. Strange 
isn't it? 

The SGA says that it 
wants to be fair to the smokers 
by providing smoking lounges 
and smoking areas. There are 
several problems with this 
idea. First, who is going to 
instruct the smoke to stay in 
the smoking areas? Second, 
will the smoke listen? The 
purpose of air conditioning/ 
ventilation systems is to evenly 
distribute the conditioned air - 
and smoke- throughout the 
building. 

An analysis of the air in 
the passenger- compartments of 
commercial airlines showed 
that nicotine levels in some 



areas of nonsmoking 
sections was actually higher 
than those in the smoking 
sections. These studies 
indicate that "smoking 
areas" would have to have 
their own seperate 
ventilating systems to have 
any real effect on a healthy 
environment. There goes 
the cost of the roof! 

Lest you think that I 
find no merit in the 
proposed bill, let me say 
that I am grateful for a 
student government that 
cares enough to do 
something about this touchy 
problem. It would be far 
; easier to ignore the whole 
thing, but it won't "go 
away". Thank you Scott and 
SGA for caring . One small 
step at a time is how we 
learned to run wasn't it? 

Richard Jones 
Junior 



Opinion Page 



Letters to the Editor 



Are You Misled or Just Mistaken? 



Dear Editor, 

Concerns expressed about 
the so-called "Radical Left" 
have made waves lately, not 
only here at Northwestern, but 
across the Nation. Most 
recently, Ivan McDonald 
addressed this issue, causing 
much contreversy. So, here I 
go, leaping into the fray. 

First, as a concerned and 
intelligent citizen of this 
country and this world, I am 
interested in the free exchange 
of ideas. Insults and mud- 
slinging are acceptable forms of 
speech; however, in a forum 
purporting to be that of 
intellect, written by a student of 
higher education, mindless 
bashing of any group using 
inflammatory language does not 
farther ideas but hinders the 
thought processes and 
e ncourages blind emotional 
responses. Please, Mr. 
McDonald, let us attempt 
conversation, or at least aim 
insults at ideas, not people. 
Neither my nor your sanity is in 
luestion because we disagree, 
and we all have worth and 
v alue. Mr. McDonald, I would 
^80 appreciate it if you would 
refrain from making 



accusations of drug use among 
groups of people about whom you 
obviously can only speculate. 

To answer charges put forth 
in the article, let me point out 
that Ecology, and specifically 
tree planting is not the only 
thing the "Radical Left" is 
working towards. Groups also 
exist to stop racism, sexism, 
unnecessary killing, starvation, 
and other anti-human problems 
that face the Earth. 

Trees are a concern for 
many reasons, the biggest 
perhaps being the production of 
oxygen. As urban sprawl and 
agriculture destroy masses of 
oxygen producing forest land 
every year, our population is 
already over 5 Billion people and 
growing rapidly. Trees and other 
plants are necessary for the 
continued production of oxygen 
and removal of carbon dioxide. 
And while agriculture is 
important in the feeding of the 
world's populations, areas like 
the rain forests do not have deep 
enough soil to support 
agriculture. These areas will in 
time become wastelands as 
agricultural groups move on to 
other land. Thus, no oxygen will 
be produced in those areas. This 



has already happened to once 
lush Lebanon and Ethiopia. For 
anyone interested in a biblical 
statement to backup the 
conservation of trees, how about 
this from Deuteronomy 20:19: 
"When you besiege a city in war, 
do not destroy its trees... for is a 
tree a person that should be 
destroyed by you?" 

Mr. McDonald, you jump to 
a very incorrect conclusion when 
you state that "the phase-out of 
older, coal-fired power plants" 
means a turn towards "safer and 
cleaner" nuclear power. Either 
this was a deliberate attempt to 
mislead you readers, or you 
simply were too eager to make 
your point and didn't think about 
that statement. There are many 
other alternative sources of 
energy, including wind power, 
water and steam, and the most 
promising, solar power. 
According to ACT NOW, a group 
of businesses working to help the 
environment, the U.S. spent ten 
times more on solar research in 
1980 than today. We now spend 
ten times more on nuclear & 
fossil fuels than on renewable 
energy. The solar panels which 
were proving quite effective from 
farms and suburbs in the Mid- 



West to the White House have 
been abandoned in the Reagan 
and Bush years. Once the nation 
pulled out of the energy crisis of 
the late seventies and early 
eighties, we figured it would 
never happen again. Mr. Reagan 
removed the solar panels from 
the White House, and sent out a 
message to alternative energy 
researchers: no more funding. 

Most advocates of recycling 
are aware of the toxic bleaches 
used in paper recycling. We do 
not support their use. Of course, 
paper recycled without bleaches 
and chemicals are not nearly as 
pretty as new paper and 
bleached paper, but what 
difference does that make? 
Toilet paper, newsprint, and 
notebook paper do not need to be 
brilliant white, and are excellent 
uses for recycled paper pulp. 

Acid Rain is another 
important concern, of course. It 
is misleading, however to state 
that the content will not effect 
the already acidic lakes. Natural 
waters vary in pH balance, 
depending on vegetation in the 
area, what mineral beds the 
water filters through, and other 
natural factors. The variance, 
though, is not near that of lakes 



affected by acid rain, some of 
which currently have a pH below 
4. On a scale of 7, that's very 
acidic for a life supporting 
ecosystem. 

I question the irrelevancy of 
monies spent to clean up our 
environment. How much of the 
tax-payers' money went to 
support Bush's Persian Gulf 
War, now revealed as a 
deliberate attempt to get rid of 
the Kurds. By the way, if a 3- 
month old Iraqi or Kurdish baby 
were placed in front of an 
American tank, would it stop? I 
hope so, just as that bulldozed 
did, but I'm not sure. How many 
human lives were sacrificed in 
the Persian Gulf? To rephrase 
your statement, They would 
waste a life to save 50 cents a 
gallon on gasoline. 

So, ignore the bandwagon, 
quit screaming insults, and do 
what you feel is necessary to 
make the world we live in a 
better place. But quit using 
jingoism and rhetoric, and start 
using your minds. Thank you, I 
have a job, a life, and live firmly 
in the DOs. This is the decade to 
learn from the past, not repeat it. 
Are you learning? 

Madelyn Boudreaux 
Senior 



Current Quotes 



Question: What do you think about the Demon wood carving in the Union? 







to'kki Grant 

Social Work 
; ^oushatta 



j * think it's stupid and a waste of money. 



Wayne Lambert 

Accounting 

Slidell 

Senior 

It's unique if. we have an extra 5,000 
dollars in the budget to do something like 
this. If so, it's O.K. 



Kanat Ransi 

Scholars' College (Pre ■ Med) 

Baton Rouge 

Senior 

I really think that the money could've 
been used for educational purposes or 
something more productive. 



Monty Hoover 

Criminal Justice I Psychology 

Slidell 

Sophomore 

It was done well, but the money could've 
been used elsewhere. 



TheSummerSauce July 9, 1991 15 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 




MY DEGREE GOT ME THE INTERVIEW. 
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You can begin to develop impressive leader- 
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THE SMARTEST COLLEGE 
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE. 

For more information contact 
Major Stephanie Hargrove at 357-5156 



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URREN 



SAUCE 



t: 





Demon Sports 

■ Rube Wins Award, p 7 

■ Don't Die Wondering Golf Classic, p 7 

■ Carron Wins Preseason Ail-American, p 7 




12J\lll)\JL ICLl 1 age, UXv 

■ Who Do You Vote For? 

■ Writer Responds to DWI Taskforce 



TheSummerSauc 




July 23, 1991 



The Summer Magazine of the Current Sauce 



Vol. 80, No. 4 



Inside 

Baseball 
Recruiting 
News, p6 



Tuition and 
Fees, p9 



The Sauce 
Poll, pll 



Guest Columnist 

Oral Roberts 
University vs. 
Northwestern 
State, pii 



ELECTION of 



Hollow ay, Blanco Speak 
In Natchitoches on 
Campain Trail 



Coverage Begins on Page 3 
Editorial, p 10 



Sports Information Whiz Awards, p7 



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The Front Page 



Holloway, Blanco campaign in Natchitoches 




by Van Reed 
Editor 

With the Louisiana 
Gubernatorial race 
only a few months 
away, the candidates 
are picking up the 
pace by crisscrossing 
the state in a blitz of appearances. 
Two of the lesser known candidates 
stopped in Natchitoches recently to 
try and drum-up support. 

U.S. Congressman Clyde 
Holloway spoke before the Lions 
Club of Natchitoches, yesterday. 
Holloway, the Republican nominee 
for governor, spoke to the club on 
issues he has been working on while 
serving as congressman for the 
eighth congressional district. 

The Brady Bill, which put a 
seven day waiting period on the 
purchases of handguns, was one 
topic Holloway stood strong on. 

"I saw Brady in a wheel chair 
sitting in front of the capital with 
all the Liberals around him." 

Holloway added that the Brady 
Bill just causes paper work for the 
sheriffs office. Holloway and other 
republicans in congress supported a 
database which would allow the gun 



The Congressman answered simply, "If we 
can't balance the budget, we don't need a 
pay raise. " 



Blanco is "not one of the good-old-boys" 



sellers, sheriffs and others an 
"immediate check on a guy's 
records" 

"If we keep cracking the door a 
little bit, they will push it open to 
total gun control," he said. 

When asked about the closing of 
England Air Force base in 
Alexandria, which is in Holloway's 
district, he responded, "We fought it 
and will continue to fight it." 

He said if the base is closed, it 
can be converted into other 
facilities. 

"We've got to be optimistic and 
do it." 

While at the Lions Club 
meeting, Holloway was asked about 
the U.S. Senates pay increase. The 
Congressman answered simply, "If 



we can't balance the budget, we 
don't need a pay raise." 

Holloway added that he he had 
never voted for a pay raise and he 
does not support the Senate's raise. 

Although having very little 
name recognition, Holloway feels 
optimistic about his campaign for 
governor. 

"We've got a shot. We're polling 
eight now and I feel confident we 
will pass Duke." he said. 

Blanco 

Public Service Commissioner 
Kathleen Blanco from Lafayette 
Parish, and the first woman to 
enter the Governor's race, spoke 
before the Alumni Center last week. 

Blanco a one-time school 



teacher and bookkeeper entered the 
race because, "we simply cannot 
afford to watch as political battles 
of the past are fought by the faces of 
yesterday." 

The Democrat Blanco pledges a 
administration of inclusion rather 
than exclusion She said the current 
administration is pointing a deaf 
ear at the people it represents. 

Blanco is out and running on 
the "not one of the good-old-boys" 
platform as she tries to raise money 
for her under-funded campaign. 

But she is no stranger to 
underfunded campaigning. In her 
state legislature campaign she was 
out spent four to one. But Blanco 
hit the streets, knocked on doors 
and racked up an impressive win by 
gathering 60 percent of the vote. 

Other candidates 

Blanco and Holloway are joined 
in the race by David Duke, Edwin 
Edwards, Gov. Buddy Roemer, 
Aaron Broussard, Sam Jones, and 
Anne Thompson. 

■ Editorial page 10 




Scholars' College Seniors 
Eligible For Financial Help 
With Theses 



Seniors working on thesis projects 
at the Louisiana Scholars' College at 
Northwestern State University are 
eligible for fellowships awarded by the 
school through a grant made by the 
Louisiana Education Quality Support 
Fund. • 

A committee of outside evaluators 
for the LEQSF, chaired by Dr. Daniel L. 
Wulff of the State University of New 
York at Albany, recommended that 
$26,000 be awarded to the college over 
two years so that it may pursue goals of 
"providing close student-teacher 
interaction, and facilitating research by 
undergraduate students." The 
committee cited the Scholars' College 
proposal, the Senior Thesis 
Development Initiative, as 
representative of a "significant new 
direction in undergraduate education. 

"It is a model for the state and the 
nation that we hope other institutions 
will seek to emulate," the evaluation 
stated. 

The fellowships may be used for 
purposes including subsidizing travel to 
special collections or libraries, the 



acquisition of books or software for the 
University's library, or the purchase of 
lab equipment for experiments. The 
fund also will support student travel to 
conferences and the publication of a 
Thesis Bulletin featuring abstracts of 
all of the year's projects. 

Another way LEQSF funds will 
enhance senior theses will be through 
the creation of a Board of Visitors. 
Members of the board will hail from 
prestigious universities and colleges 
from throughout the country, and will 
provide guidance to students writing 
theses and to faculty directing them. 

Students of the College currently 
devote about half of their energies to 
courses in the Common Curriculum, a 
process that culminates with the 
completion of a senior thesis. 

Dr. Grady Ballenger, director of the 
College, and Darrel Colson, associate 
professor of philosophy, are co- 
coordinators of the project. They 
anticipate that approximately 30 
research fellowships will be granted to 
students each year. 



1940's Radio Hour is underway. Shown in rehearsal are cast 
members (from left) Todd Dupree of Martin, Dale Higginbotham of 
Natchitoches and Patty Breckenridge of Houston. 1940's Radio Hour 
will be performed July 26-28 in the Alley. For tickets call 357-5819. 



TheSummerSauce July 23, 1991 3 



News in Brief 



Six New Faculty Join 
Division of Business 

Six new full-time faculty 
members teaching in four 
different areas have been 
added to Northwestern's 
Division of Business 

Dr. Barry Smiley, Head 
of the Division of Business, 
said the increase in faculty is 
a direct result of the 
increased numbers majoring 
in business. 

Dr. Robert Alost, 
president of Northwestern 
and Ed Graham, vice 
president of Academic Affairs 
hired the six faculty members 
for the Fall semester. 

The new faculty members 
are Dr. Steve Kromis, 
accounting; Dr. Debasish 
Banerjee, computer 
information systems; Dr. Joel 
Worley, management; Mrs. 
Penny Simpson, marketing; 
Dr. Dennis Hyams, computer 
information systems; Mrs. 
Mary Beth Tarver, computer 
information systems. 

Hunt to judge Masters of 
Innovation Competition in 
Chicago 

Dr. William Hunt, a 
member of the Northwestern 



State faculty, has been 
selected as a judge for the 
Masters of Innovation III 
Competition to be held in 
Chicago July 25. 

The competition, 
sponsored by Zenith Data 
Systems, recognizes 
kindergarten through grade 
12 educators as well as 
college and university 
students, faculty and staff in 
the United States and 
Canada. 

Entries in the contest 
consist of papers which 
describe development or 
application of personal 
computer software and/or 
hardware to creatively 
address a problem within a 
field of study. 

Hunt is active in the 
coordination of academic 
computing at Northwestern. 

Judges selected for DC I 
Summer Music Games 

Nine judges from around 
the country have been chosen 
to judge the 1991 Drum 
Corps International Summer 
Music Games tour stop to be 
held at Turpin Stadium on 
the Northwestern State 
University campus Sunday, 



August 11 at 7 p.m. 

Judges for the brass 
section include: Steve 
Calhoun of Carrolltown, Ga, 
(field); James Sheckler of 
Columbus, Ohio (ensemble); 
Mike Rubino of Morgan Hill, 
Calif, (general effect). 

Percussion judges will be 
: Michael Mann of Miami 
(field); Sherman Hong of 
Hattiesburg, Miss, (ensemble) 
and Ted Nicholeris of 
Braintree, Mass. (general 
effect). 

Visual judges will be 
Joseph B. Krepel of Margate, 
Fla. (field); Phil Madden of 
North Versailles, Pa. 
(ensemble) and Tim Benge of 
Chino, Calif, (general effect). 
Madden will be the chief 
judge. 

Five of the top 30 drum 
corps in North America are 
scheduled to take part in the 
DCI show. Tickets are selling 
quickly according to Bill 
Brent, NSU band Director. 
Advance tickets are available 
for $10 by calling (318) 357- 
4522. 

Scheduled to compete at 
Northwestern as part of 
DCI's "1991 Summer Music 
Games" are the Marauders of 



Longview, Wash., the Blue 
Knights form Denver, the 
Magic from Orlando, Fla., the 
Phantom Regiment from 
Rockford, Dl, and the 
Cavaliers from Chicago. 

The stop in Natchitoches 
is one of six stops around the 
country leading up to the DCI 
World Championships to be 
held in Dallas on Aug. 13. 

Wind Ensemble selected to 
appear at conferences 

Northwestern State 
University's wind ensemble 
has been selected to appear 
at the 1992 biennial meeting 
of the College Band Directors 
National Association/ 
National Band Association 
Southern Division Conference 
to be held in January in 
Charlotte, NC. 

The wind ensemble, 
conducted by Bill Brent, head 
of the Department of Creative 
and Performing Arts and 
Director of Bands at 
Northwestern, was one of 
four groups invited to 
perform at the conference. 

The wind ensemble 
consists of many of the top 
musicians in Northwestern's 
music program. 



Co-op student nominated 
for award 

Robert C. Washam, Jr. of 
Natchitoches, a marketing 
major at Northwestern State 
University, has been 
nominated for the TCEA 
Distinguished Scholar Award. 

The award is given to 
students participating in 
cooperative education 
programs who have excelled 
both academically and 
professionally, according to 
Margaret Kilcoyne, NSUs 
Cooperative Education 
Project Coordinator. 

Washam, who is 
employed at Willamette 
Industries' Red River Mill in 
Campti, produces the 
quarterly newsletter at the 
mill. Washam's efforts at the 
plant have produce an 
improved newsletter that has 
saved money for the 
company. 

TCEA will present two 
awards nationally to 
outstanding cooperative 
education students, one to a 
student at a four-year 
university and a second to a 
student at a community 
college. 



NAVY 

You and the Navy. 
Full Speed Ahead. 




Navy Recruiting Station 
121 Royal Street 
Natchitoches, LA 71457-5019 
(318) 352-5757 



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Restaurant 

22 1 Texas Street 

Natchitoches, LA 
Open 6 a.m. to 3p.m. 

352-7477 

Breakfast & Lunch Specials Served Daily 




4 July 23, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



The Big Picture 



Get The 
Knowledge 





e live in a society 
that revolves 
around 

information. We 
are constantly 
bombarded with 
announcements, 
advertisements, 
signs, posters, 
stickers, and even 
"program length commercials." As college students it is easy to 
dismiss much of the "unwanted" information as useless and a 
waste of time; unfortunately there is some good that is being 
thrown out with the bad. 

A normal college student may do all that is necessary to 
stay on top of school work, home work, class work, and 
sometimes social work, but there is a larger world outside of the 
gates of Northwestern. It is upsetting and even disturbing that 
many students are not aware of what goes on around them. Not 
here on campus, but the nation and even the world in general. 
Now this column is not about being "correct" or even pro this 
and denounce that; this is about just knowing. Too many 
columnists and writers before me have talked about apathy and 
giving something back; I'm writing about giving something to 
yourself. 

The FCC estimates that the average human being watches 
about seven hours of television a day. So 
very often a college student may watch 
that amount of television (usuaiiy much 
less), but in most cases none of that 



Now this column is not about being 
"correct" or even pro this and denounce 
that; this is about just knowing. 



time is spent viewing a newscast. There '.MMCogle that 
could say "You're a journalist.-.isn't this a kittle self 
serving?" Actually it's student serving. In a world with so 
much change and so little time to do so, it seems very 
important that the people who will be leading this 
country have some idea about how it's run. It is painful 
to see journalism majors and other majors as well not 
know about what is taking place anywhere.Even more 
disturbing is to hear a journalism major say something like "I 
hate watching the news." You might want to change yowr major 
real quick. 

Now there may even be some people that say "I think news 
is so boring." True, it's not the funny pages, but it is real life. A 
reporters job is to make the very complex seem simple. They 
must make an Economic Summit sound like a gossip session in 
a dorm room. After all, there are so many other people that 
think that news is boring also. 

The available mediums make news possible for all sorts of 
people with many different tastes. It is imperative that a 

^ student be able to talk about 

more than just the latest 
thing. No, this is not a plea for 
more "deep thinkers" (there 
are too many supposed "deep 
thinkers" running around 
campus already), however it is 
a means lor stimulating 
students to pay attention to 
what is happening in the 
world that we will eventually 
control. Right now the biggest concerns may be grades and 
dates, but there is more to being a student that just that. As a 
college student, we are part of a minority of students world wide 
that are actually pursuing something beyond high school. That 
places a responsibility on us to succeed. It may not seem like a 
large responsibility now, it soon will be. 

By no means am I saving that all students should line up 
with a particular political train of thought. I ajn saying that 
students should be aware of the different views in the world. If 
you choose to join this group, or sit in with that group, or just sit 
back and watch; you are still aware. It doesn't take much more 
than skimming a newspaper once a week or flipping to CNN 
during a commercial break while watching the Fresh Prince of 
Bel Air. Not everyone is a Tedd Koppell nor should you be 
compelled to watch Nightline every night, but it is important to 
know just what's going on. News may be boring but one day vou 

may be in the headlines, wouldn't you 
want someone to know who you are? 



by .Leonard A. Williams Think about it. 



The 
Summer 
Sauce 

Published every other week 
during the summer by the 
students of Northwestern 
State University 

Van Reed, Editor 
Jon Terry, Sports Editor 
LecnardWilliams, Staff 
Judy Francis, Staff 
Jason Oldham, Staff 
Damian Domingue, Staff 
Brian Shirley, Staff 
Russ Harris, Artist 
Chris Young, Photographer 
Eben Cook, Advertising 
Tom Whitehead, Adviser 



How to Reach 
TheSummerSauce. 

(318)357-5456 Student 
Publications Office 

(318) 357-5096 Editor's Office 

(318) 357-5456 Advertising 

(318) 357-5213 Adviser's 

Office 

(318)357-6564 Fax # 

225 Kyser Hall 
P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 



Do Feel 
something good, something real. 



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(coupon good for up to 4 adults, kids under 10 years. $1.99, kids 2-5 yrs. $.99) 



352-1135 



Mr. Gatti's 

123 Hwy 1 South Natchitoches 
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Lunch 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., and Dinner 5-8 p.m. 



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Price does not include $.29 6alad bar or soft drinks. 



expires 7/31/91 

TheSummerSauce July 23, 1981 5 



!i:tllli>M1»IIK<UlCtt»ttl 



— 



Recruiting News 



Wells Rebuilds Championship Team 



By Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 

After the 1991 record- 
setting championship season, 
Northwestern Demon baseball 
coach Jim Wells found himself 
losing players right and left. 
But the summer's recruiting 
has proven profitable. 

In his summer signings, 
Wells has acquired seven 
pitchers, four infielders, three 
catchers and two outfielders to 
rebuild his SLC champion 
squad. Here's a look at Coach 
Wells' brand new Diamond 
Demons: 
Pitchers- 
Bobby Fernandes of Elk 
Grove, Ca., transfers to 
Northwestern after a red-shirt 
season at Florida State. The 
junior righty was his high 
school's Outstanding Student 
Athlete his senior year, as well 
as a California All-State pick. 
His 17-3 record as a reliever at 
Sacramento Junior College 
made him All-State and league 



MVP. 

Junior right-hander Reggie 
Gatewood transfers after two 
years at Arkansas State. The 
Moblevalle, Ar. native recorded 
a 6-10 record there, including 
the school's fourth ever no-hit 
shutout. His brother Jim is a 
former Demon assistant. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. native 
Dominic Viola comes from 
South Florida Community 
College, where he had a 5-4 
record and 3.59 ERA last year 
with 60 strikeouts. 

Southpaw Rich Paschal of 
Phoenix, Az. moves in from 
Scottsdale JC, where he played 
first base, outfield and 
designated hitter as well as 
pitching. He batted .364 with 
30 RBI's last year, and 
collected awards all through 
high school. 

Jeff Homeyer, a left- 
hander from Corpus Christi, 
will arrive at NSU from Alvin 
JC with a 10-10 record after 
two years. 



Chet Zachary of Mount 
Pleasant, Tx. comes out of high 
school with a 24-5 record, 
including an 11-1 performance 
that got him District Pitcher of 
the Year as a junior. Last year 
he was 5-4 with a 1.70 ERA 
and batted .315. 

Randy Floyd comes from 
Richardson, Tx., where a 5-4 
record with a 3.44 ERA and 64 
strikeouts in 54 innings made 
him All-District. He is going to 
school on a Presidential Merit 
Scholarship and a NASA 
Scholarship. 
Infielders- 

Paradise Valley, Az. native 
Greg Sharko transfers in from 
Phoenix College where the two- 
time all-conference first 
baseman batted .387 with 21 
doubles and 52 RBI's. 

Mike Johnson of Brooklyn 
Park, Mn. left Boone JC as an 
all-region shortstop. In high 
school, he was twice all-region 
in football, twice all-conference 
in basketball and once all-state 



in baseball. 

Third baseman Troy 
Conkle, a Mansfield, TX. 
native, comes from Paris JC 
with 17 doubles, a .322 batting 
average, and all-conference 
honors. 

Richardson, Tx. product 
Kyle Shade, also on third base, 
comes to NSU from Panola JC. 
Catchers- 

Natchitoches boy Mickey 
Mondello comes home after 
time at first LSU, then San 
Jacinto JC, where he made all- 
conference. He hit .326 last 
year, .357 in conference. 

Brent Hughes of Center, 
Tx. leaves Shelbyville High 
School as an All-State 
shortstop, but will cross over to 
catching for the Demons. 

Terry Alario of Marrero 
follows his dad's footsteps to 
Northwestern as a member of 
John Curtis High Schools state 
Championship team. 
Outfielders- 
Archbishop Shaw High 



School product Terry Joseph 
comes to Northwestern from 
Marrero with a .345 batting 
average, five homers, 12 stolen 
bases, 15 RBI's, and All- 
District and All-State honors 
under his belt. 

Murray State JC transfer 
Paul Saunders is from Durant, 
Ok., and is hitting .313 in 
American Legion ball this 
summer. 

"We will have more depth 
in the pitching staff than last 
year, and better hitting, but it 
doesn't look like a lot of power," 
says Coach Wells of his new 
players. "The synopsis is that 
we well be pretty similar to last 
year, except that we will have 
more depth. The guys that ate 
returning will have to get 
better, and the players 
returning will be an immediate 
help." 



Don't Forget to 

Sell Your Books 

Back! 

We look foward to your business in the Fall 

University Bookstore 



/ N 



THE 



STUDENT 
7:30-4:30 Monday— Friday 



UNION 



6 July 23, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



Demon Sports 



SID Office, Radio Broadcaster Win Awards 



Members of Northwestern 
State's sports information staff 
have recently received five 
professional achievement 
awards, including three from 
the Louisiana Sports Writers 
Association. 

For the second strait year, 
a Northwestern student 
received the LSWA's "Ace 
Higgins Award", a $600 annual 
scholarship grant to the state's 
outstanding sports information 
student assistant. James 
Cottrell, a Minden native and 
Natchitoches resident, won the 
honor in voting by the other 
state SIDs. 

Troy Mitchell of 
Zanesville, Ohio, won the same 
award last year as a graduate 
assistant SID. it marked the 



first time in at least 15 years 
that a Northwestern student 
won the prestigious award. 

Cottrell also won the 
LSWA's first place award in 
the "Sports Information/Best 
Release" category for a story 
detailing a week in the life of 
Demon football coach Sam 
Goodwin. 

Northwestern SID Doug 
Ireland, the 1990 writing 
contest winner, finished third 
in this year's contest with a 
story promoting football stars 
Andre Carron, John King and 
Greg Necaise - all of whom 
won major honors following 
the 1990 season. 

The 1990 Demon football 
media guide edited by Ireland 
with assistance from Mitchell 



was recently named third in 
the Division I-AA District VI 
competition by the College 
I Sports Information Directors 
' Association. The district 

covers New Mexico, Texas, 
| Louisiana, Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Oklahoma. 

The Demon football media 
guide was later ranked 27th in 
the national Division I-AA 
contest. 

Tommy Newsom, who will 
officially join the Northwestern 
: SID staff this fall as a 
' graduate assistant, won a 
j national award from the NAIA 
j Sports Information Directors 
Association. 

Newsom, student SID at 
Austin (Tx) College for the 
past four years, won 10th place 



in the NAIA's "Best 
Reproduced Brochure" contest 
for his 1990 Kangaroo football 
guide. 

Northwestern's radio 
network flagship station, 
KZBL-FM of Natchitoches, and 
play-by-play announcer Doug 
Joubert received two LSWA 
awards. Joubert won a first in 
the LSWA's broadcast division 
in the "Best Spot Reporting" 
contest for coverage of a press 
conference announcing NCAA 
sanctions against the NSU 
basketball program and he was 
second in the "Best Play By 
Play" contest for his account of 
the Demon football team's 31- 
24 unset of No. 11 ranked 
Jackson State last fall. 



Sports in Brief 



Northwestern, New 
Orleans, Cowboys ticket 
information released 

Ticket information for 
the 1991-92 football season is 
as follows: 

Northwestern Demons 

Season tickets $30; Individual 
tickets $8 reserved, $5 general 
admission, $3 children. 
Tickets on sale after Aug. 30. 
Call 357-5251. 

New Orleans Saints 

Season tickets $250 plaza and 
end zone, $180 terrace and 
upperrows; Individual tickets 
$18 terrace and upper rows. 
Call (504) 522-2600. 

Dallas Cowboys 

Season Tickets $290-upper 
deck and sidelines, $250 
corners, $210 upper deck and 
end zone; Individual tickets 
$25 reserved seating. 
Call (214) 556-2500 



Lady Demon collects award 

Northwestern's first 
toftball Ail-American, junior 
etcher Rhonda Rube, added to 
tar already long list of awards 
tart week when she was named 
'he Louisiana Athletic 
Directors Association "Player of 
theYear". 

Rube, a native of Baton 
^°uge, had also won the award 
tar freshman year. This year, 
along with being named a 
""ifd-team Ail-American, Rube 
tad also been honored as 
Southland Conference and 
tauisiana "Player of the Year", 
^ta led the Lady Demons to a 
44-18 -1 record, along with the 
title and a No. 5 ranking 
111 the NCAA South Region. 

This past season, Rube 
6, J the squad in batting 
average, slugging percentage, 
r~l' 8 > home runs, doubles and 
^ts. She set school season 
^rds in hits and RBI's last 
2Jr, and is expected to set an 

CAA record in doubles this 
year. 

>ron named Preseason 
^■American 

p Senior linebacker Andre 
arrori has been named a 
^vision I-AA Preseason All- 
^erican in the 1991 NCAA 
°otball Preview. Carron was 
ta only Louisiana or SLC 
Mf tyer ii 8 ted for Division I-AA. 
Q The 6-0, 230-pound 
Pelousas native collected 154 
ptles, including 13 for loss, 
0r Coach Sam Goodwin last 
.^r- He was also named the 
^Louisiana Defensive 
^*yer of the Year", and has 



been first team All-SLC for two 
consecutive seasons. 

The Host 
Communications magazine 
predicts Northwestern to finish 
third in the conference behind 
Southwest Texas State and 
Sam Houston. Northwestern 
"boasts toe best collection of 
skilled players in the league" 
and should contend for the 
championship, says the 
tnasszins. 

HSE to broadcast Northeast 
game 

A new agreement has 
been signed between the 
Southland Conference and 
Home Sports Entertainment to 
broadcast ten games over the 
next year, including defending 
SLC champion Northeast 
Louisiana at Northwestern 
game on October 26. 

The contract is set for 
four football games, four men's 
basketball games, the women's 
basketball championship game 
and the volleyball 
championship game. Along 
with Northwestern's game 
against Northeast, HSE will 
broadcast Southwest Texas at 
Stephen F. Austin on Oct. 12, 
North Texas at McNeese on 
Nov. 2 and Northeast at 
Stephen F. Austin on Nov. 16. 

Tennis players receive 
national honor 

Three members of 
Northwestern's Lady Demon 
tennis team named to the 1991 
Volvo Tennis/Scholar Athlete 
team last week by the 
Intercollegiate Tennis Coaches 



Association. 

Victoria Sims, Jane 
Paterson and Karen Patel, all 
natives of England, were 
among a record 32 women 
nationally that were voted onto 
the team. Patel, a repeat 
selection, graduated in May 
with a 3.91 gpa in Business 
Administration and is one of 
only twelve men and women to 
exceed 3.9. Paterson ; also 2 
repeat selection, has a 3.52 gpa 
in Psychology, and Sims has a 
3.61 in Business 
Administration. 

Northwestern was one of 
six schools that had three or 
more of the total 72 men and 
women named to the team. 
The only other school with 
three women was Indiana. 

Requirements for the 
team were 1) being a varsity 
letter winner, 2) having a 
cumulative gpa of at least 3.5 
and 3) junior or senior status. 

Patel receives SLC 
scholarship 

Graduated senior Karen 
Patel .Northwestern's first 
academic Ail-American, is one 
of two athletes to receive this 
year's Southland Conference 
McDonald Scholarship, 
according to Commissioner Bill 
Belknap. 

Patel will be awarded a 
$1000 scholarship for graduate 
education after recording the 
highest gpa of all SLC senior 
athletes. She was also named 
Northwestern's "Female 
Scholar-Athlete of the Year" 
and an Academic All-Southland 
Conference selection three 



times, along with being a third 
team selection on the 1991 
GTE Academic Ail-American 
team. 

The Winchester, 
England native finished her 
career ranked third on NSCs 
all-time singles list and fourth 
on the doubles list. 

Patel intends to continue 
her education at George Mason 
University, where sne will 
enter graduate studies in 
international business. 

New softball recruit 
announced 

Lady Demons softball 
coach Rickey McCalister 
announced yesterday the 
signing of Buena (California) 
High School pitcher Kristi 
Parcel. 

Parcel, a native of 
Ventura, California (along with 
Lady Demon Rustie Stevens) 
was named "Most Valuable 
Player" at Buena High after 
throwing 10 shutouts and 2 no- 
hitters on the way to an 18-4 
record with a 0.69 ERA. She 
also recorded a .359 batting 
average and led her team in 
RBI's. 

"Her main position will 
be pitcher. She has good 
control on a lot of pitched and 
will see plenty of time during 
the fall," said McCalister of his 
new recruit. "Kristi Parcel will 
be a good addition to our 
program." 

Parcel will join All-SLC 
and All-Louisiana picks Nancy 
and Claudia Percle and Jemi 
LaHaye on the Lady Demon 
pitching staff. 



Fundraiser scheduled for 
Aug. 3 

The "Don't Die 
Wondering III Golf Classi " 
will be held Saturday, Aug. 3, 
to benefit the Northwestern 
State Lady Demon basketball 
program. 

The $35 per player entry 
fee covers green fee, and 
chicken and pizza lunch and a 
commemorative cap. The 
scramble tournament is limited 
to 25 four-man teams and will 
be handicapped. Over $1000 in 
prizes will be awarded to the 
first and second place teams for 
low gross and low net scores. 

The tournament also 
includes a shot at the "Foy 
Motors Shootout", a chance to 
win a 1992 Buick LeSabre. The 
first player to hit a hole in one 
on the 14th hole will win the 
car. 

Tee times at the 
Northwestern Hills course are 
8 a.m. and 1 p.m. with times 
assigned first come, first 
served. The tournament will 
also feature two closest to the 
hole contests along with the 
most accurate drive and 
putting competitions. 

The tournament, 
sponsored by the Northwestern 
Athletic Association, has raised 
almost $5000 for the Lady 
Demon program in the first two 
years. 

For more information, 
call David Stamey at 357-1262 
or Doug Ireland at 357-6467 
during business hours. 



TheSummerSauce July 23, 1991 7 




Photographers 
For The Fall 



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Sauce Office 
225 Kyser Hall or call 
357-5456 



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407 Bienville Street, Natchitoches, La. 
Open Monday thru Saturday 
8 a.m.— 6 p.m. 
352-3141 



8 July 23, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



I 



Natchitoches Campus 
Undergraduate 



Northwestern State University 
Tuition and Fees 
Fall 1991 

Graduate 



Shreveport Campus 
B.S. Program — Undergraduate 





REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 






REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 






REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


9TUDENT 




HOURS 


fees 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


HOURS 


PEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


HOURS 


rEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 
































1 - 3 


•283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


1-3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


1 - 3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


4 


1340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


5 


1396.25 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$431.50 


5 


$396.50 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$431.75 


5 


$396.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$396.25 


6 


1452. 50 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$487.75 


6 


•4 5 7.50 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$492.75 


6 


$452.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$452.50 


1 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$544.00 


7 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$544.00 


T 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$508.75 


8 


» 5 65. 00 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$800.25 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$600.25 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$565.00 


8 


1621.25 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$656.50 


•< 


$790.00 


$0.00 


$73.50 


$863.50 


9 


$621.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$621.25 


10 


1677.50 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$712.75 












10 


$677.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$677.50 


11 


$733.75 


$0.00 


$35.25 


$769.00 












11 


$733.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$733.75 


IK 


$790.00 


$22.00 


$73.50 


$885.50 












12* 


$790.00 


$22.00 


$58.50 


$870.50 



M.S. Program — Graduate 



A.D. Program 



Other Campuses 
Undergraduate 





REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 






REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 






REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 




HOURS 


FEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


HOURS 


FEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


HOURS 


FEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


1-3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


1-3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


1 - 3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


10.00 


$340.00 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


5 


$396.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$396.25 


5 


$396.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$396.25 


• f 


$396.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$396.25 


6 


$452.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$452.50 


6 


$452.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$452.50 


6 


$452.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$452.50 


7 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$508.75 


7 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$508.75 




$508.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$508.75 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$565.00 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$565.00 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


• 0.00 


$565.00 


9* 


$790.00 


$0.00 


$58.50 


$848.50 


9 


$821.25 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$621.25 


9 


$621.25 


$0.00 


• 0.00 


$621.25 












10 


$677.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$677.50 


10 


$677.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$677.50 












11 


$733.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


•733.75 


11 


$733.75 


• 0.00 


•0.00 


$733.75 












12. 


$790.00 


$22.00 


$52.75 


$864.75 


12. 


$790.00 


$0.00 


•0.00 


$790.00 



Other Campuses 
Graduate 





REGISTRATION 


STUDENT 


STUDENT 




HOURS 


FEES 


INSURANCE 


ASSOCIATION 


TOTAL 


1-3 


$283.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$283.75 


4 


$340.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$340.00 


5 


$396.25 


• 0.00 


• 0.00 


$396.25 


6 


$452.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$452.50 


7 


$508.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$508.75 


8 


$565.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


1565.00 


9. 


$790.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$790.00 



Meal Plans 

10A HEAL PLAN $571.20 19A HEAL PLAN. . • . $561 . 40 

109 HEAL PLAN $622.20 19B HEAL PLAN. .. .$632.40 

14A HEAL PLAN $550.80 VARIABLE A PLAN. .8663.00 

14B MEAL PLAN $601.80 VARIABLE B PLAN . .$166.30 



Out-of-State Fees 
($75.00 per credit hour) 



Other Fees 



Undergraduate 



Craduate 



International Student Fee (Flat Rate) 60.00 

Aluani Pee irirst-Tiew Candidates for Graduation) 1.00 

Parking Peralt IS. 09 

Late Resist rat ion Fee 15.00 

Application Fee s - 09 

Infiraary (Natchitochea - Required of all dor a students). 20.00 

Dona (ooaa: Double Occupancy (Natchitochea) 490.00 

Single Occupancy (Natchitochea) 820.00 

Double Occupancy (Shre»eport) 484.00 

Single Occupancy ( Shreyeport I 808.00 

Harried Student Houaing: One Bedrooai - Per Month 175.00 

Two Bedrooai - Per Month 200.00 

Installment Plan Fee 30.00 



1 - 



3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12. 



$ -0- 
300.00 
375.00 
450.00 
525.00 
600.00 
675.00 
750.00 
825.00 
900.00 



$ -0- 
300.00 
375.00 
450.00 
525.00 
$00.00 
900.00 



Refund Policy 
A student who offically resigns 
on or before the last day to register for 
credit will receive 100 per cent credit 
to his account of all refundable fees. 
These include fees identified on the 
biliystatement as registration fees, 
out-of-state feeB, labatory fees, and 
student association fees. A student 
who officially resigns within seven 
calendar days after the last day to 
registar for credit will receive 50 
percent credit to his account of all 
refundable fees identified on the 
bill/statement as registration fees, 
out-of-state fees, labatory feeB, and 
student association feeB. After this 
date, no refund or credit will be made. 
Dropped courses are not refundable 
at any time and will not be credited to 
a student's account. In some cases, 
the refund policy will result in a 
reduction of charges and not cash 
refund 

installment Charge Policy 
Student may elect to pay 
certain fees, room charges, meal 
charges, etc. in installments as 
allowed by current Installment 
Policy. The student electing to pay in 
installments instead of in full, will be 
charged a $30 per semester/session 
non-refundable Installment Charge. 

All student electing to pay in 
installments will be charged the $30 
Installment Charge, including 
University student workers, graduate 
Btudente, full-time and part-time 
employees, etc. 



Students who have not paid 
their cost of attending the University 
or have not signed an approved 
payment plan document (Schedule of 
Payment Agreement) during the 
normal registration process will be 
charged the $30 non-fundable 
Installment Charge as follows: 

1) Pall and Spring Semesters: 
Within seven days of last day to 
registar for credit. 

2) Summer Session: Within 
seven days of last day to registar for 
credit. 

3) Interim classes during any 
semester/session: Within seven days 
of fi rat day of class. 

Student who elect to pay in 
installments during the registration 
process and then decide to pay in full 
after making the installment election 
will not be refunded the Installment 
Charge. The Installment Charge is 
not refundable. 

Students not on an approved 
Installment Plan and who increase 
their registration fees, room charges, 
meal charges, etc. after the 
registration process and who do not 
pay the increase in full with two days 
after the charges are made will be 
charges the $30 Installment Charge. 

The Installment Charge can be 
waived by the University's Director of 
Student Financial Aid when the 
University has caused a delay in the 
processing of a student's Financial 
Aid. 



ALL FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




1011 KeyserAve. 
352-5109 



TheSummerSauce July 23, 1991 9 



Editoral Page 



TheSummerSauce 

EDITORIAL 

Who Are We Going 
To Vote For? 

Election years in Louisiana can either be fun 
are horrifying. This year's Gubernatorial 
Race has yet to show any signs of 
developing into one of those fun years. 
There are so many candidates running for 
governor it is hard just to list them all. 

David Duke. A former Klansman. He ran a 
tight race for the U.S. Senate last year but his 
showing in the governor's race will not be as 
strong. Why? Edwin Edwards. 

Edwards. A gambler. The front runner 
has always done well with the black vote and he 
has a large following. Edwards will definitely be 
in the run-off. 

Gov. Buddy Roemer. The ivy-league guv. 
It is hard to say what will happen to the governor. 
His opponents are out to get him. He has 
balanced the state's budget for the third year in a 
row, but he vetoed the abortion bill. 

Clyde Holloway. The congressman who 
lost his district. Holloway is not well known in 
the state-wide media, but he has received much 
attention for taking the Republican nomination 
away from Roemer. 

Kathleen Blanco. "Not one of the good-old- 
boys. " But Blanco also faces problems. Her 
campaign is under-funded and she also is not well 
known by the media, but she has appeal as really 
new face to the race. 

There are plenty more running for 
governor. If ever there was a time to vote, now is 
it. But, who do you vote for? We're still trying to 
figure that one out. Maybe the state will get lucky 
and five or six candidates will drop out of the race. 



The Current Sauce is published four times during the summer 
semester by the students of Northwestern State University of Louisi- 
ana. It is not associated with any of the university's departments and 
is financed independently. 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to the above 
address or brought to the office. Letters to the editor must include the 
author's classification and hometown, as well a telephone number 
where the writer can be reached. No anonymous letters will be 
printed, although names will be withheld on specific request from the 
author. The Current Sauce reserves the right to edit all correspon- 
dence. 

The deadline for all advertisements and copy is 3 p.m. the 
Thursday before publication. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

The Current Sauce is entered as second-class mail at Natchitoches, 
LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 




Letters to the Editor 



Enough is Enough 



Enough is enough. I hate 
drunk drivers as much as 
anyone, but let's give it a 
rest. 

I do not drink. I had a 
friend killed several 
years ago while driving 
home drunk one night, 
and I have not tasted 
alcohol since. I do not 
disapprove of others 
drinking, in fact, most of 
my friends do drink. I 
will drive them anywhere 
they need to go. 

What I am writing is 
in regards to the Natchi- 
toches DWI Task Force. 
Matters are becoming 
somewhat ridiculous. I 
have been stopped by this 



task force three times in the 
last three weeks. I was 
followed for miles each time 
until I did something like 
dodge a pothole in the road 
and cross the yellow line. 

After I was pulled over, I 
was given a sobriety test. If 
you have never been given 
this test, it is quite humili- 
ating. The ironic thing was 
that I was doing my part all 
three times I was stopped; I 
was driving people home 
who were intoxicated. 

I have nothing against 
the police of Natchitoches 
and Northwestern, on the 
contrary, I think they do a 
fine job. I just believe their 
efforts could be better 



utilized if they were 
focused in other direc- 
tions, the drug problem 
for instance. A Drug 
Task Force in Natchi- 
toches would make me 
proud. 

Drinking and driving 
do not mix. I do not allow 
my friends to drive home 
drunk. But let's give this 
DWI Task Force thing a 
rest. I am sick and tired 
of being harassed for 
driving my friends home 
late at night after they 
have been drinking. 
Enough is enough. 

Jason Oldham 
Senior 



10 July 23, 1991 TheSummerSauce 



J 



Opinion Page 



Guest Columnist 



Oral Roberts vs. Northwestern 



E. ?v' name is Michael. I'm 
ttudent at Oral Roberts 
Diversity in Tulsa, 
)klar> rma Okav. okay, now 
t questions are starting, 
be a a time. 01 ease.. .You 
Bhere, what's your 
nestion 9 Oh, yes. I'm in 
latch hoc he s for the summer 
scause my family lives here, 
ou next, in the fuschia tank 
p.. .President Roberts is just 
He. No, I don't see mm 
*ery day. The lady in 
toffs and the pink tube 
fcNo, I'm not going to be a 
tor ORU is a regular old 
berai arts college, iust like 
ly otner private university, 
ire we have theology 
Hjor.s. hut we also ha- 1 -' 
lologv maiors, busine.- 
tejors, English maiors, and 
pouter majors. I happen 
6e a music major. (And all 
e music majors 
•id... amen.) Are there any 
*»re questions? Oh, yeah. 
*ck if I know why I'm 
Kng an article for 
brthwes tern's 
»per . . . probably because , 
'ving studied music for 
"fee years, I'm highly 
Miffed. 

"So what's he gonna 
*fite about?" Well, I've had 



a few suggestions to write 
about the new wooden demon, 
but I figure I'd better not go 
insulting school icons in my 
first article. Besides that, ORU 
has nutty little architectural 
schemes of its own. Right now 
as I type, they're working on 
moving a huge brass pair of 
praying hands from the front of 
the City of Faith hospital to the 
entrance of the student parking 
lot. They say they'll get 
finished by registration time. 
In this writer's opinion. ..fat 
cnance. When I left last week 
tney hadn't moved anythin < 
yet. They had only ripped up 
tne driveway and built a 
wooden frame that I assume 
the hands will eventually rest 
on. So, no matter how funny- 
looking your chainsaw demon 
is. at least you can still get to 
tne parking lot. 

It's very interesting to be 
on another campus after being 
at ORU for three years. There 
ar^ some striking differences, 
even at first glance. 
Northwestern is a pretty 
campus; nice brick buildings, 
lots of trees, a few more 
modern looking buildings.. .your 
basic "I'm a college and 
I've been here a long 
time" look. Oral 



Roberts University, on the 
other hand, has only been there 
25 years (last year was the 
anniversary). When people 
come on campus, generally 
their vocabularies are reduced 
to a single word, usual) 
"Wow," or the more expressive, 
"Ooooo." This condition lasts 
for about an hour. After this 
hour is up, the old vocab 
returns slowlv. The first 
garbled syllables that return 
are mostly things like "outer 
space," '"landed." and "Jetsons." 
See, a lot of ORU was built in 
the '60s, and it was kind of 

I built with the "futuristic" look 
in mind. So, of course it looks 

I like the Jetsons. But actually, 
it really is a beautiful campus, 
but just not in the relaxed, ivy- 

j leagueish way. 

Another nice thing about 

i Northwestern is the parking 

| situation. Around here you can 
Dretty much find a legal 

i parking lot near almost any 
building on campus. But at 
ORU there s one student 

| parking lot. Of course, there 
are other lots, but it isn't just 
anyone that can park there. 

i Not unless you want to risk a 

by Michael Jones 



ticket. So, we Oral Roberts 
University students tend to do 
a lot of walking. Walk to class, 
walk to the cafeteria, walk to 
the Aerobics Center, walk to 
the dorm and take a nap 
because you're worn out. To 
top it all off, they won't let us 
use the elevators in a lot of 
buildings. So if you see a ORU 
student and he looks like he's 
in really good shape, voull 
know why. It's because he had 
to park a half a mile away at 
the grocery store because a bv: 
pair of brass hands were 
biocmng the driveway. 

I think the most strikm-' 
comparison of all, though, is 
the people. At ORU we tend to 
have a lot of people. Here at 
Northwestern, you seem to 
have much the same situation. 
Lots of people. And I notice 
that both here in Natchiotches, 
LA and there in Tulsa. OK, the 
people do a lot of the same 
things. We smile, think, cry, 
study (as little as we can get 
away with), tell jokes, love. 
And surprisingly enough, Oral 
Roberts University students 
have problems! The secret's 
out. I'm an ORU student, and I 
have late papers, 
money problems, and 
girl troubles. "Oh my 



gosh, Michael, don't tell me 
ORU students are human!" 
Yep. And some of the people 
there aren't as thrilled abom 
God as you might expect, 
either. 

I guess my bottom line is 
that people are all oasically 
the same. As a student 
yourself, you know that a bio 
major ana a graphic arts 
major are botn oeople, even 
though they "know" different 
subjects. Well, whv should I 
be anv different, iust because 
I go to a Christian school? 
Sure I'm a Christian, and I'm 
very excited about God. That 
doesn t mean that 1 can't 
communicate witn you. even 
though vou might be a 
Buddhist. Jewish, or an 
atheist. If you re a music 
major, we can talk music. If 
you're a math maior... urn... 
we can talk music Point is. a 
person can'tte judged by his 
background or his activities. 
A Derson can only be 
understood in the context of 
who he is. Really. In other 
words... if you promise not to 
judge me for my giant praying 
hands, I promise not to judge 
you for your big wooden 
demon. 



Sauce Poll 



tabloid or Not Tabloid? 
that is the question. 



Each week more and more 
students, faculty and staff tell 
the Sauce that our new summer 
tabloid format is better than the 
tradional broadsheet format 
is published in the fall and 
Mng. 

We cannot decide which format is 
it. So you tell us what to do by 
%ng the Sauce Poll. 

The poll will be conducted each 
Sekday. An answering machine will 
^wer your phone call and record 
St vote of "Yes" or "No." You will 
have to leave your name. 



A vote of "Yes" says you like the 
new format and want us to keep it. A 
vote of "No" say you don't want us to 
keep the tabloid format. 

Feel free to tell us more than just 
"Yes" or "No." Tell us why you feel 
the way you do or tell us what we can 
do to improve the paper. 

The number to call is 357-5096 
Monday thru Friday between 12 p.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

This is your forum. By voting, 
you give us the chance to better serve 
you. 



The Sauce Poll 



A bi-weekly forum on issues that affect Northwestern State University 

SHOULD THE CURRENT SAUCE 
REMAIN IN THE TABLOID FORMAT FOR 
THE FALL AND SPRING? 



YES 




NO 



357-5096 



The Sauce Poll is not scientific but does serve as an informal gauge of the intensity of feelings on an issue 



TheSummerSauce July 23, 1991' 11 " J 



lorthwestei 
Northwes 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 




ARMY ROT< 






OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ON THESE 

DOORS FIRST. 



Why? Because Army ROTC helps you develop 
management and leadership skills. Builds your 
self-confidence. And makes you a desirable 
candidate in the job market. 

There's no obligation until your junior year, 
but stick with it and you'll have what it takes to 
succeed — in college and in life. 




ARMY ROTC 



THE SMARTEST COLLEGE 
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE. 

For more information contact 
Major Stephanie Hargrove at 357-5156 



<ew columnists give views 
,n campus issues, page 2 



Pootball preview '91... 

Goodwin sizes up lines, page 7 



IK 
522 



Sororities pledge 
107 women, page 12 



Current Sauce 



r lume 80, Number 5 



Northwestern State University 



September 3, 1991 



Campus Briefs 

' 

fewspaper editor appeals 

/an Rodney Reed, who was appointed editor of the Current Sauce in April, 
I meet with the Student Government Association's media board this week 
ippeal his dismissal from the editorship 

)ue to Reed's absence from the Current Sauce, Elizabeth McDavid Harris 
, Chris McGee are serving as co-editors of this issue. Harris served as 
naging editor for the past year, while McGee served as sports editor, 
•he media board will meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday in room 106 Kyser Hall 
ear Reed's appeal. 

SU Police capture award 

Members of Northwestern State University's Police Department captured 
honors for the third straight year at the annual Louisiana University Police 
icers Association Convention held recently on the Northwestern campus. 
SU's policemen won the pistol match held at the Northwestern ROTC 
oor range. The team was comprised of Northwestern Police Chief Rickie 
liams, Detective Doug Prescott and Officer Joey Cox. Northwestern won 
jistol competition for the fourth straight year. 

ox, who is from Florien, also captured the Officer of the Year Award. He 
ms chosen by a panel of judges from throughout the state. Cox, a student at | 
orthwestern, is a full-time university police officer. 
Northwestern, which has won the Officer of the Year competition three 
ears in arow, will host LUPA' s annual convention again next year. Williams 
:rves as the association's president. 



Jarred to serve on council 

Dr. Ada D. Jarred, director of libraries at Northwestern State University, 
as been appointed to the Library Services.and Construction Act Advisory 
-ouncil on Libraries by Thomas F. Jaques, state librarian of Louisiana. 
The council was set up under the Library Services and Construction Act 
igh which many Louisiana state-based library programs are financed, 
act authorizes the council to advise the State Library on the development 
evaluation of the state's long-range plans for library services. 
Jarred' s appointment runs through July 1992. 

■hi Alpha Theta gets award 

The International Office of Phi Alpha Theta has awarded Northwestern 
tate University's Phi Alpha Theta chapter a Special Commendation Award. 

This is the second straight year Northwestern 's chapter, the Pi chapter, has 
eenhonored. The chapter has also been invited toparticipate in the Phi Alpha 
fata National Convention to be held in Chicago. 

The international honor society for history majors, Phi Alpha Theta 
'corded the largest number of applicants and awarded the largest number of 
rants in the organization's history during the past academic year. 

Over the past year, the NSU chapter brought Col. Robert Doughty, head of 
^U.S. Military Academy's Department of History, to Natchitoches. 

Susan E. Dollar is president of the chapter. Faculty advisors are Dr. Maxine 
tylor, head of the Department of Social Sciences, and John Price. 

English teachers plan meet 

The LouisianaCouncil of Teachers of English will hold its annual conference 
"day and Saturday, Sept. 27-28 in Lafayette at the Lafayette Hilton. 

The theme of this year's conference is "Pathways to Discovery," according 
lD r Paralee Norman, professor of English at NSU-Fort Polk. 

Speakers at the conference include Robert Anderson, author of / Never 
* n 8for my Father, Tea and Sympathy and The Sand Pebbles; Mary Alice 
'Ontenot, author of the Clovis Crawfish series of children's books; Susan 
fjeune, Louisiana's 1991 Teacher of the Year and Millie Davis, National 
Council of Teachers of English Affiliate Director. 

Barbara Freiberg of Baton Rouge is LCTE president, Nancy Monroe of 
*' e xandria is first vice-president and Penny Toney of Alexandria is second 
>lce president. Mary Broussard of Baton Rouge is the treasurer. 

f 

Smothers Brothers to appear 

^ e Smothers Brothers will appear in concert at Northwestern at 7:30 p.m. 
1111 Thursday, Sept. 26, in Prather Coliseum as part of the NSU Concert Series. 
I ° n -floor table seating is available from the Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Aphony. Ticket prices for on-floor seating are $25 per couple and $ 1 00 for 
^'e of eight. Each table will be decorated, and a bottle of wine will be 



k ^ e Smothers Brothers, Tom and Dick, are in their fifth decade of 
inning together. The Smothers Brothers have performed on various 
'°* s since the 1 960s and continue to do so. They now spend most of their 



lime 



touring the country, taking their sibling rivalry on the road. 



^EP has spring openings 

d^Portunities for overseas placement during the spring 1992 semester 
by!, U8h th e International Student Exchange Program have been announced 

, 0, n Whitehead, director of Northwestern International Programs. 

Most of the exchange programs are for the full academic year, but usually 
^ s Pring semester placements open up as they did this year," Whitehead 

s^PPHcations for the program must be filed by Friday. "A delay in 
^'Wng of several days is possible but certainly a week would be the 



c ' mu ni," said Whitehead. 
M ° Unirie s available for placement in Spanish are Argentina, Colombia, 
;„ ' c ° and Uruguay. Brazil is possible for those fluent in Portuguese. 
■lui) 1Sh lan E ua g e placements are available at several programs in Finland, 
and Kor ea. The only French-speaking program available is at the 
j, o er site du Benin in Togo. 



Registration woes ease this fall 

Students, faculty voice less criticism of system 



By PAUL PARKER 
Staff Writer 

Many Northwestern students dread 
the first week of school because they 
associate it with registration. 

However, registration this fall 
compared to last year seemed rather 
mild. Although no official numbers 
are ready, many school officials say 
that this could be the school's largest 
enrollment. 

If the univeristy does surpass last 
fall's total of 7,334, this would put 
Northwestern's growth at 
approximately 40 percent since Dr. 
Robert Alost arrived. 

Hugh Duram, the new registrar, 
began work at probably one of the 
busiest times of the year for his 
oosition at a growing univeristy. 



Duram comes to Natchitoches after 
spending two years at England Air 
Force Base as Northwestern ' s central 
Louisianacoordinator. Duram agrees 
with his colleagues in Roy Hall when 
it comes to being excited about the 
upward trend in the number of 
students. 

Having seen registration, Duram 
said that he felt that for the most part 
it "seemed smooth and quiet." 

Also pleased with this fall's 
registration is Dr. Ed Graham, vice 
president of academic affairs at 
Northwestern. Graham said he feels 
that registration went well as a direct 
result of measures taken for 
preregistration. 

"We provided a lot of opportunities 
for preregistration and many students 



registered at Freshman Connection," 
said Graham. 

Many new classes and sections 
were offered because of the 30 new 
faculty members' at Northwestern. 
Graham said that these numbers were 
"very pleasing." Of 30 new faculty 
members, 18 will be filling newly- 
created positions this fall. 

Unfortunafely, there were some 
negative aspects of registration, say 
students. A smooth registration does 
not necessarily mean a fun one. 
Sophomore business major Johnny 
Kavanaugh will quickly agree. 

"Registration is hell. Maybe that's 
why we're the Demons," said 

Kavanaugh. "Every year it gets more 
screwed up." 



Welcome Back 





Phote* by Tony I 

Above, students wait in line at 
the University Bookstore to purchase 
supplies and textbooks. During the 
days of registration, students had to 
wait in lines at the coliseum as well. 

Left, cars and trucks pack the 
parking lot below Sabine Hall during 
weekdays at Northwestern. Many 
school officials believe that this fall 
will mark the university's highest en- 
rollment mark. 



Holliman, Leakey to speak 

Lecture series attracts anthropologist, newsman 



1 



m ore information, call Whitehead at 357-5213. 



CNN correspondent John Holliman 
and anthropologist Richard Leakey 
will visit Northwestern this fall as 
part of Northwestern' s Distinguished 
Lecture Series. 

Holliman will be at NSU at 1 1 a.m. 
on Thursday, Sept. 12, and Leakey 
will deliver his lecture at 9:30 a.m. on 
Thursday, Oct. 17. Both lectures will 
be held in the Fine Arts Auditorium 
of the A.A. Fredericks Creative and 
Performing Arts Center. 

The topic for Holliman 's lecture 
will be the continuing chaos in Iraq. 
Leakey's topic will be "Can We Save 
the Elephants?" 

Holliman, who is based in 
Washington, was part of CNN's 
dramatic coverage from Baghdad on 
Jan 16 when the allied air attack 
began on Iraq's capital city. Holliman 
and colleagues Peter Arnett and 
Bernard Shaw, were the only 
journalists to continue reporting from 
Baghdad the night the bombing 



began. 

Currently, Holliman specializes in 
coverage of independent agencies of 
the federal government including 
NASA, the Federal Aviation 
Administration and the National 
Transportation Safety Board. He also 
covers the U.S. Education 
Department, the Department of 
Transportation and other federal 
agencies. 

In June of 1 989, Holliman was part 
of CNN' s coverage of China' s historic 
student demonstrations and 
subsequent government crackdown 
and party purge. In October of 1989, 
he was CNN' son-site reporter during 
Hurricane Hugo. 

Leakey, the director of wildlife and 
chairman of the National Museums 
of Kenya, has lectured around the 
world on a variety of topics. 

He is currently working to focus 
world attention on man's killing of 



elephants. According to Leakey, 
650,000 elephants have been killed 
over the past decade. That is half of 
the elephant population that existed 
in 1980. 

Leakey, a high school dropout, has 
written four books on evolution and 
has challenged several established 
evolutionary theories. 

Leakey has shown a good knack 
for publicity in his effort to halt the 
international trade of ivory which is 
taken from the tusks of elephants. He 
once burned 12 tons of ivory to 
demonstrate that poaching would no 
longer be tolerated. Through a 
worldwide ban on ivory and his efforts 
to embarrass those who wear it, the 
value of ivory has dropped from $200 
a kilo to $2 a kilo. 

He has also created controversy by 
promoting a project that would fence 
in Kenya's wildlife parks to create an 
8,000-square-mile zoo. 



Chris Hubbs, a freshman business 
major, after correcting a mistaken 
out-of-state tuition charge, summed 
up the event. 

"It was heinous," said Hubbs. 

However, Claire Breaux, a senior 
in the Louisiana Scholars' College, 
said she thought that this fall's fee 
payment and registration were 
efficient, adding that the people 
working registration were "very 
courteous." 

"I like it better in the coliseum than 
in the student union. It once took me 
two hours in the student union but it 
only took me 30 minutes this fall," 
said Breaux. "Waiting in line is never 
fun, but, for a registration, it went 
really smooth." 

Financial 
Aid Office 
to offer 
new loan 
program 

Applications 
to be available 
in November 



Northwestern State University's 
Office of Financial Aid is now 
beginning the application process for 
the newly funded Louisiana 
Opportunity Loan Program. 

The loan program, funded by the 
legislature during the past regular 
session, is designed to ensure that 
students from middle income families 
can borrow to meet their educational 
needs. 

Applications for the loan program 
will be available in November, 
according to Gil Gilson, director of 
financial aid at Northwestern. 
Students should contact the NSU 
financial aid office to be placed on a 
list to receive the applications. 

"Each college and university was 
allotted a certain amount under the 
loan program," said Gilson. "We'll 
handle all applications on a first come, 
first serve basis." 

The legislature allocated $750,000 
for the program during the regular 
session and may appropriate 
additional funds for the program in 
the current special session because of 
strong interest. 

When fully implemented, the 
program is expected to provide loans 
at eight percent interest though the 
fourth year of repayment then 
increasing to 10 percent. 

Loan amounts would be $2,625 for 
freshmen and sophomores, and 
$4,000 for up to three additional years 
of undergraduate study. Graduate 
students may borrow up to $7,500 
per year. 

Students are required to make 
quarterly interest payments on the 
loans while in school but the payment 
of principal is deferred as long as the 
student remains in school or meets 
other requirements for deferment. 

The program will be administered 
by the Louisiana Student Financial 
Assistance Commission. 

For more information on the 
program, contact the LSFAC at (504) 
922-1011 or the NSU financial aid 
office at 357-5961. 



Page 2 



Opinions 



September 3, 19^ 



^epte 



m 



Current Sauce 




North wp^tprn NpwsTianpr 


Tina Foret 
Michelle Genre 


Elizabeth McDavid Harris 


Andrea Harrington 


oo-Hiaiior 


Maria Jones 
Jason Oldham 


vylXX lis 1T1 LlJICt 


Ashley Peterson 


L/O-rjClitor 


ram i itrKt I 


Jon Terry 


Paul Pickering 
Leah Pilcher 


OpUX Lb JLU.ILUI 


Van Rodney Reed 


I j 1 ' V 1 1 


Jennifer Roy 


Adversiting Sales 


Reporters and Staff 


Chris Needham 


Marty Branham 


Advertising Artist 


T — — — 1 117 * 1 ■ • 

Leonard Williams 


Todd Martin 


Tony Means 


Business Manager 


Photographers 
• 


Scott Mills 


NSU Box 5306 


Circulation 


Natchitoches, LA 


Tom Whitehead 


71497 


Adviser 





Why the University is Putting a Flower Bed in Front of Iberville Dining Hall 



1 . A valid way to justify tuition increases. 

2. Distract students from the Iberville food. 

3. Give Rapides Hall residents something 
to admire during a fire-alarm evacuation. 

4. Give male students a cheap source of flowers 
for their girlfriends on Valentine's Day. 

5. Something to make you go "Hmmm!" 



6. A place for freshmen to make out. 

7. To provide a tasty salad bar for Iberville. 

8. To enhance the area's natural beauty — NOT! 

9. To enhance school spirit. (That's what they said about the Vic the 

the Demon statue in the Student Union) 

10. A new motto: "Northwestern: Where Flowers Come First!" 



mk - 



College ignores non-traditional studei] 



Our Opinion 

Students urged to take 
advantage of NSU 

Northwestern has long been saddled with the stigmatic "suitcase college" 
label. Many past and present students have "passionately protested that our 
school exudes with boredom and claim that this is a brief stop between high 
school and a "real" university. But what many fail to realize is that 
Northwestern offers various activities for students to escape the ennui. One 
just has to look for it. 

As a new semester greets us, we at the Current Sauce implore you, the 
student, to get involved. We all have different interests and abilities, but we 
can all find a niche. You can become active in sundry campus organizations, 
or you can indulge in some physical activity through intramurals. The theater 
program is overflowing with new performances this fall. You can even seek 
simple yet enthusiastic fun in cheering on your Demon football team. But it 
isn't what you choose, it is that you choose. 

If you are an underclassman, you may be overcome with a trace of 
depression at the thought of facing a long academic grind on the way to 
graduation. The courses yet to be taken seem to fire a dark, menacing stare 
straight in your face. You wish you could fast-forward your life a couple of 
years. But talk to some seniors and you might develop a whole new attitude 
about Northwestern in particular and college life in general. 

We senior members of the Current Sauce could offer a case study for your 
benefit and understanding. It seemed such a short time ago that we were 
freshmen with ambitions, questions and apprehensions about what the 
college years may have in store. We looked to seniors with envy. They were 
preparing to grab their degrees, escape the books and start receiving a real 
income. We as freshmen couldn't begin to fathom their luck. 

Now, we are the seniors supposedly standing within reach of heaven. 
Soon, no more books, no more midnight-cramming for finals, no more 
intimidating research papers. True rapture! Yet something is missing. 

Sure, we won't miss those exhaustive assignments and 8 a.m. classes, but 
now we face something very imposing — adulthood. No longer can we defer 
talk of adulthood. It has arrived and we must go to meet it. 

Sometimes, the pressure strains us. Then, our past college years seem to 
tap us on the shoulder. In a pensive moment, we wish we would have slowed 
down to enjoy, appreciate and absorb our college activities and friends to a 
higher degree. 

The message is simple. Find something here you enjoy. Chances are it 
awaits you. Get involved in activities. Enjoy current friendships and forge 
new ones. 

College and Northwestern are what you make of it. Make the most of it. 



I finally cut my hair yesterday, 
after almost two years of unchecked 
growth. It wasn't as traumatic as I 
expected it to be, and I decided to 
look at it as a new beginning. Of 
course, most of my friends didn't 
recognize me, but as Tommy 
Whitehead said, "That's probably a 
good thing!" At any rate, as part of 
my new beginning I decided to write 
a column, so here goes nothing. 

Although I try not to dwell on it, I 
am sneaking up on the ripe old age of 
30, which, along with the fact that 1 
only returned to school last year, 
places me firmly in the category of 
the so-tailed "non-traditional 
student." As such, I feel a certain 
responsibility to speak for my group. 
While the average NSU student may 
appear to be fresh off the cover of 
Teen magazine, the number of NTS 
on campus is steadily increasing. 
However, the administration has not 
responded to the unique needs of 
these students. 

For example, most NTS are older 
people like myself who have decided 
to return to school to complete a 
degree that was put on hold sometime 




For the Record 



Paul Pickering 



: 



in the past. In most cases, they are 
supporting themselves, as well as their 
family. In other words, money is 
tight. However, financial aid here at 
NSU is aimed at the incoming 
freshman "traditional" student. From 
my own experience, I know that there 
are very few scholarships available 
to NTS. Were I an incoming 
freshman, my ACT scores alone 
would insure me a free ride. However, 
NSU seems far more concerned with 
luring freshman to this campus by 
virtue of offering them scholarships, 
than with meeting the financial needs 
of NTS. Many of the NTS are far 
more deserving than the freshmen 
who get the scholarships. 

Money is not the only area where 
the non-traditional student is short- 



changed. NSU' s academic facilities 
are not geared to handle the sometimes 
odd schedule of the non-traditional 
student. As previously mentioned, 
most of the NTS must work to support 
ourselves and in many cases, full 
time. By the time they get out of 
work, most of the school facilities, 
such as computer labs, are closed. 
The Watson Library keeps some 
rather pedestrian hours as well . Also, 
most student work jobs are geared to 
the standard 9 a.m . to 5 p.m . schedule. 
This means that a possible source of 
extra income is closed to NTS' s. Why 
doesn't the administration kill two 
birds with one stone? Expand the 
hours of these facilities to 
accommodate the schedules of all 
NSU students, perhaps even going to 



24-hour availability. Then, 
facilities could be staffed witl 
traditional student workers 
could use the time to do homely 
not to mention earn money. & * 

It is tirrle for Northwestern to . 
up to the 'needs of NTS. At sc 
acrossthecountry,NTS'sarepr '. ■■" 
to be the very best students on cai |g 
and many administrators are t , / - 
steps to see that they are recogi 
For example, NTS make up 
than 50 percent of the student 
East Texas State Univers 
Commerce, Texas. Last ye; 
school ' s highest academic hon 
to Sherrie Cates-Ellis, a 28-yelJ^rripU.S 
wife and mother of two. Two 
other finalists were NTS as 
This year, three of the six fn 
were once again NTS. This sc 
just one of the many who havi 
positive steps in recognizin 

assisting NTS. Hope 
Northwestern will begin to mi 
effort as well 

Well, my hands are tired, my 
just a memory and I have to ta 
Geritol tablets. I guess I will go 
and make out my will, too 




Anew green 
Loran Lindsey 



*ffic flow. 



NSU smoke-tree campaign under fire 



This summer, some folks started 
pushing their campaign for a smoke- 
free Northwestern. I really didn't 
care if NSU smoked; still don't. It 
did, however, make me wonder. Who 
has the almighty power to pass such 
legislation? And if there is such a 
God, who will this Being anoint to 
enforce such a commandment? 

Far be it for me to play God, but I 
have the solution. Hall Monitors. You 
know, like the little tattle-tellers the 
teachers hired in the fourth grade. 
Four-feet-tall snitches that squealed 
like stuck pigs every time you ran to 
lunch. I'm sure NSU has a few of 
those guys. Let's hire them. 

We'll give our Task Force black 
polyester uniforms. Give them a 
clipboard, a badge and, of course, a 
whistle. We'll let the veterans pack 
heat (a water pistol). Maybe then we 
can rid Northwestern of these terrible 
villains and their Marlboros. Light 
one up, and you'll get busted, pal. 

Scoff at my vision for 
Northwestern, but think of all the 




Bird's Eye View 



Jason Oldham 



wonderful benefits we will reap down 
the road. Not only will we have clean 
air, but no one will get hurt because 
someone is running to lunch. 

I have a brain storm. If we can get 
smoke-free legislation passed, I have 
abill I would like to see enacted — the 
NSU Smooch-Free Act. This bill 
would be a pioneer for higher 
education in our state. Life would be 
just grand. 

Allow me to elaborate. This being 
the beginning of a new semester, 
Northwestern is full of freshman. Joe 
Freshman meets Betty Freshman. 
Sigh. . . A match made in Heaven. 
Within three days, the two are madly 
in love and spend every breathing- 



moment with each other. They go 
home and meet their new found love' s 
parents, brothers, sisters, the dog and 
so on. Every second you will find 
them together. They wait in the dorm 
lobbies until visitation hours, then 
make a mad dash to their rooms. You 
fill in the rest. 

Now all of this would be fine and 
dandy and none of my business, until 
now. As of now, I am starting my 
campaign for a smooch-free NSU. 
There is nothing I hate worse than 
getting up for an eight o'clocker, 
walk up the steps of Ky ser and witness 
couples plastered together in the 
hallways. That's disgusting. How's a 
man sunnr>«»H to oet an education 



The Curi 
semester b 
Louisiana, 
departmen 
The Curr 
located in 2 
address is 1 
adviser's ol 
All correi 
Material si 
address or 1 
the author' 
number wl 
will be pri 
request by 
The deai 
before pub! 

Inclusioi 
editor. 



with folks making out right on 
the door. 

Now don't get me wrong, I 
nothing against kissing, in fact,] 
of like it. . . a lot. But there is a 
and a place for everything, and 
never intended for Man and Wo 
to make out on the fourth fta 
Kyser. 

Please join me in my camp 
Staffed with my new army of " v ^* e ^ u 
monitors, we can rid NSU of th< 'Natchitocr- 
smoking that goes on in Kyser, 
monitors can play the duel roj. 
chaperon/Smokie the Bear 
proper training, they can hand 
Especially if we gave a really 
name like a Task Force. 

We'll bust people left and r 
hundreds a day if we have to. ^ 
issue tickets, print their names ii 
paper, and make them pick up 
Together we can stop these probl 
plaguing our campus. Then and 
then will Northwestern 
Natchitoches be a safe and hi 
place to live. Amen. 



Your Opinion... Letters to the editor 



Newspaper needs 
to investigate 

NAMES WITHHELD 

NSU has broached wider horizons 
now, for the last two years: the 
entering class, again, is much larger 
than it was three years ago, and there 
are more faculty, as well; a new and 
acclaimed section of the University, 
the LSC, has graduated its inaugural 
class; a new department, journalism, 
has been incorporated. These 
achievements merit high praise. 
However, much remains for us to 
tend to; we must look at the past, and 
consider our present, before we can 
truly meet the potentialities our 
growth affords. 

What we are calling for, essentially, 
is a deeper understanding of the 
mechanisms of the University — a 
task for which the Current Sauce is 
best suited. It is one crucial source 
for information on campus. Through 
investigative reporting, and much of 
it, the University community could 
become more active and less static. 

Unfortunately, precedent informs 
us little investigative reporting gets 
done. Case in point: 

1. There was apparently a 
controversy regarding the selection 
of the manager of the University radio 
station. For most students, 
information on the controversy was 
only available through one or two 
angry letters to the Current Sauce. 
Would it be possible for the Current 
Sauce to inform the student body of 



who was in the running and how and 
why the current manager was 
selected? 

2. Rumor has it that there was also 
a strange change in the makeup of the 
NSU Supreme Court. Were three 
members, supposedly appointed for 
their undergraduate academic lives, 
removed from office in a Senate 
meeting held behind closed doors? 
How was the Senate able to do this? 
What were the reasons for their 
removal? Can the Current Sauce talk 
to those involved, and inform the 
students as to what has happened? 

If our objection to last year's 
coverage of an issue seems nit-picky 
or irrelevant to the present moment, 
please step back and reconsider your 
position. First, within our University 
community, the conditions 
surrounding the appointment of the 
radio station manager and the removal 
of these justices is akin to President 
Bush appointing a new FCC chair, or 
removing three Supreme Court 
justices. The point is, all of these 
events are newsworthy. None of 
them received adequate coverage in 
the Current Sauce. 

Secondly, as the University 
community grows, the need for such 
in-depth reporting grows, too. To be 
sure, there will be rewards to reap 
from our expansion — but hazards 
will crop up. Should students continue 
to pour in, where will they be housed? 
Does the University anticipate 
running out of dorm rooms? It may 
seem far fetched, but because NSU is 
an open admissions institution, it is 
not out of the realm of possibilities. 



Another potential problem: crime on 
campus. As the number of students 
increases, so will the number of "bad 
apples." Will the University police 
be able to cope with the influx? 
Doubtlessly so, but how will they 
have to adapt to the new NSU? 

The possibilities outlined here 
present serious dilemmas. They may 
prove insurmountable if the 
University community is not 
informed of them, so that it can act 
accordingly. Campus media will play 
a critical role in making students 
aware. It will be an awesome task — 
one that the campus media has not 
consistently met, though occasionally 
it has shown an ability to do so. At 
any rate, at any cost, investigative 
coverage of on-campus dilemmas 
must increase. If such a burden 
requires me'dia organizations on 
campus to re-organize, perhaps 
distance themselves from traditional 
power sources, then so be it. 
Regardless, we charge it with a 
responsibility — becoming a more 
comprehensive source for 
information about everything and 
every group within the University 
community. 

Writer critiques 
recent editorial 

NAME WITHHELD 

I would like to address Van Rodney • 
Reed's article, "Society Needs a 
Booster Shot," printed in the July 9 
edition of the Current Sauce. 
Actually, I'd like to address Reed's 



fallacious reasoning and his 
misinterpretation of our country's 
constitutional philosophy. 

Before I deal with the problematic 
portions of the article, I'd like to say 
that he does make some good (good 
being relative here) points. Society 
does indeed "need a booster shot." I 
personally believe that as a society 
we have become far too activist in 
our pursuit of equality. Margo 
Mankes vs. the Boy Scouts of 
America is certainly a case in point. 
Contemporary Americans seem to 
interpret the constitutional notion of 
equality as meaning "no one can be 
denied admission to anything, 
regardless of the circumstances." In 
other words, "Damn the standards, 
full speed ahead!" Unfortunately, 
the constitutional notion of equality 
as expressed by the founders refers to 
equality of opportunity; it never 
asserts that we are all "equal." It 
would be ludicrous to try to judge 
everyone and every situation by the 
same standards; no two are exactly 
alike. 

Reed makes what I believe to be a 
valid point when he argues that by 
assuring that both the Girl Scouts and 
the Boy Scouts are given equal access 
to activities, a measure of equality 
can be achieved. Segregation of 
private organizations on the basis of 
sex should not be objectionable as 
long as there is no segregation of 
opportunity. For Mankes to argue 
that only by participating in coed 
activities can her "equality" be 
realized would be analogous to 
arguing that the success of Florence 



Griffith Joyner was diminished 
because she didn't win her Olympic 
titles by triumphing over Ben Johnson 
and Car! Lewis! Let's face it, men 
and women are different, and there is 
no need to scream "sexism' every 
time that distinction is made. In fact, 
the Supreme Court has established 
precedents, such as the case of 
Bazemore vs. Friday, which affirm 
the right of private organizations to 
segregate themselves, even on the 
basis of race. And isn't this a good 
thing? It is, in effect, an extension of 
our right to say whatever we want, or 
believe whatever we want, even if 
others may find these words and 
beliefs objectionable. 

Now that I've expressed my 
agreement with Reed on this point, I 
must express my disagreement with 
the validity of his arguments. To be 
specific, he reaches many of his 
conclusions through incomplete 
understanding and fallacious 
reasoning. He writes that our country 
was founded on the philosophy that 
"majority rules." Sorry, but that just 
isn't true. "Majority rules" would be 
the proper definition of a democracy, 
and we are not that. America is a 
republic, and one of the goals of the 
founders was to avoid tyranny by the 
majority. If our country truly was a 
democracy, and rule was by majority, 
you had better believe that there would 
never have been a civil rights 
movement! For how, in a democracy, 
would it be possible for minorities to 
impose their will on the white 
majority? Our republican system of 
government, which was and is unique, 



makes it possible for everyone! 1 
heard and represented. It ispreci 
this system that provides "one pcfl 
the opportunity to "change a ^ 
organization" without being squ* 
by that same organization. Remel 
Dr. Martin Luther King? 
certainly exhibits an und 
understanding of our poli 
principles when he makes assert 
about "majority rules." 

Reed also shows an alafli 
fondness for informal fallacies 
"ad Hominem" attack on Mankes 
her parents is irrelevant to 
conclusion of America's impe* 
communism! I believe it is 
cause to assert that Mark 
court case will result in changi"! 
monetary system from do\\$ 
rubles. 

In closing, I'd like to say ® 
understand that literary and edi 1 " 
license allows Reed to $ 
assertions based on emotion 
belief. I'd also like to say ^ 
many ways his editorial addf f 
key problems in our society 
shows an awareness of current I s * 
However, I feel it is an ed' 
responsibility to be clear on hi 5 
and to speak from a strong ^ 
understanding. And I disagree 
editorial "ad Hominem" and 
Populum" arguments, because 
are dangerously persuasi v6 fl 
misleading to the general P"J 
many of whom are uninform e 
readily accept the journalist's 
as fact. Perhaps in the future 
will word his opinions more c& e 
and responsibly. 



Baj 

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September 3, 1991 



News 



Page 3 




Theater program thrives under Wann 



ut the Vic the 
Student Union) 
i First!" 



tide 

lability. Then, 
d be staffed with 
:udent workers, 
time to do home 
i earn money. 
■ Northwestern to 
Is of NTS. Atsc 
itry.NTS'sarepr | 
est students on ca 
ninistrators are t | 
at they are recogi | 
NTS make up j 
it of the student 1 
State Universi 
'exas. Last yea 
st academic honoL 

es-Eiiis, a 28 ye ; a mpus beautification 

Photo by Tony Means 

^ a new green area is under construction in front of Iberville Dining Hall. According 
ai j Loran Lindsey, campus spokesperson, the project is part of a campus master plan 

who have S"9 ned tw0 years a9 °- He said one P ur P ose of ,ne garden is to eliminate some of the 
„ flic flow. 



By MARIA E. JONES and 

PAUL PARKER 
Staff Writers 

The NSU Theater is not only alive 
and well but flourishing under the 
direction of Dr. Jack Wann with five 
upcoming main stage productions 
during the 1991-92 season. 

Although Wann came to 
Northwestern as a consultant to size 
up and refurbish the theater program 
which had dwindled over the years, 
he now heads the program because of 
the enthusiasm and support that he 
has received from the faculty. 

With 70 incoming students to the 
theater along along with returning 
students, Wann now has one of the 
fastest growing program at 
Northwestern. 

Freshmen are coming from all parts 
of the state including Shreveport, 
Lafayette and the School for the 
Performing Arts in New Orleans. 



Students have also been recruited 
from New York and as far away as 
Calgary, Canada. 

New faculty will also be joining 
the theater program. Sue Cherry from 
St. Mary's in Indiana will instruct 
dance while John Johnston of Seattle 
will take over costuming this fall. 

In addition to recruiting students 
and faculty, Wann constantly 
promotes the upcoming plays of the 
fall. He encourages all interested 
students to audition for parts in the 
plays. Auditions are competitive, but 
all students are given an equal 
opportunity to audition for parts, he 
said. 

"I encourage interested students 
to look for the audition times in the 
Current Sauce, on the theater call 
board in the central hall of the A. A. 
Fredericks Creative and Performing 
Arts Center," said Wann. He added 
that students may also come by room 



ler of two. Two 
:s were NTS as 
ee of the six fii 
in NTS. This sc 
many 

» in recognizin 



NTS. Hope 
will begin to mi 

nds are tired, my 
and I have to ta 
. I guess I will go 
ny will, too. 

fire 

cing out right on 

;et me wrong, I 
kissing, in fact, 
)t. But there is a 
everything, and 
for Man and Wo 
i the fourth fkx 



ne in my camp | 
ly new army 
in rid NSU 
ses on in Kyser. 
Jay the duel rol 
:ie the Bear 
, they can hand! 
e gave a really 
;k Force, 
eople left and r 
if we have to. V 
int their names ii 
; them pick up n 
; stop these probl 
npus. Then and( 
lorthwestern 
i a safe and hi 
rien. 



Current Sauce 

Northwestern's Newspaper 

The Current Sauce is published every week during the fall 
semester by the students of Northwestern State University of 
Louisiana. It is not associated with any of the university's 
departments and is financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of Student Publications 
located in 225 Kyser Hall, telephone (318) 357-5456. The mailing 
address is P.O. Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. The 
adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone (318) 357-5213. 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to the above 
address or brought to the office. Letters to the editor must include 
the author's classification and hometown, as well as a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed, although names will be withheld on specific 
request by the author. 

The deadline for all advertisements is 5 p.m. the Thursday 
before publication. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discretion of the 
editor. 

The Current Sauce is entered as second-class mail at 
itoches, LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



of :. 
ofth< 'Nateh. 



106 in the fine arts buiiding and see 
him. 

Actors are not the only people 
needed, he said. 

"Students also build the sets, make 
the costumes and work on the lighting, 
making it possible for anyone to have 
the fun of being apart of the theater," 
said Wann. 

All Northwestern students also 
have the opportunity to sit in on 
workshops and training conducted 
by working actors from New York 
and Los Angeles. 

Wann says he is excited about the 
upcoming seasons. 

"We feel that we're offering a solid, 
diverse season of plays," said Wann. 
"Anyone who attends the entire 
season should get a good overview of 
theater". 

The 1991-92 season will have one 
more production than the 1990-91 
season with the addition of a 



Christmas play, "The Gift of the 
Magi", which Wann said is a "present 
to the community." It will be 
presented Dec. 5-8. 

Other fall semester plays include 
Moliere's classic farce "Tartuffe" 
Oct. 15-22 and a new work by 
playwright Larry King, "The Night 
Hank Williams Died," which will 
run Nov. 20-24. 

The popular Loft Series also 
continues this year. It is presented in 
a more informal setting and focuses 
on the acting, directing and the 
particular work being presented. At 
the end of each presentation the 
audience will have the opportunity to 
interact with the performers. 

The spring schedule includes "The 
Rimers of Eldritch" by Lanford 
Wilson and Lerner and Lowe's 
"Brigadoon". 

Tickets are free to students with as 
valid ID. 





f 



See You After 

8:00 PM. 
WHOPPER. 




Burner King 



.99 



plus tax 



e for everyone 
ented. Itispreci 
rovides"oneps' i 
to "change a *i 
thout being squ2 
nization. Reme" 
ither King? 
ibits an unc 

of our polf 
he makes assert 
rules." 
lows an alarn 
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ttackonMankes 

irrelevant to 
nerica's impCj 

believe it is 
that Mark We J 
suit in changifJ 
ri from doll^ 

1 like to say 
iterary and edi" 
; Reed to <" 
1 on emotion 
like to say tn) 
editorial addr f 
l our society- 
:ss of current i* 
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be clear on hi 5 
m a strong t> a 
^nd I disagree 
jminem" af' 
lents, because 
f persuasive 
le general P" 
re uninformed 
: journalist s 
in the future * 
ions more cafe 



All BABAS 

Welcome Back Students 

Come Party With Us and Enjoy the 

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Page 4 



News 



September 3>\\ % 



Nursing faculty complete newborn project 



A prenatal care project involving 
two members of the faculty from 
Northwestern State University's 
Division of Nursing has paid off for 
workers at the Sunbeam Appliance 
Plant in Coushatta. The payoff 
includes healthier babies and a 
reduction in maternity-newborn costs. 

The two Northwestern faculty 
members, Dr. Patricia Thompson and 
Billie Bitowski, were consultants on 
the project. In the 12 months before 
the project covering part of 1984 and 
1985, workers at the plant or their 
immediate family gave birth to five 



Campus 
Connections 



American Chemical 
Society 

All chemistry and related majors 
are invited to attend the American 
Chemical Society meeting at noon on 
Friday, Sept. 6 in room 123 of the 
chemistry building. 

Anthropology Club 

The Anthropology Club will meet 
at 1 1 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5 in the 
archaeology lab. A memento from 
the movie "Dances With Wolves," 
donated to the club by actor Kevin 
Costner, will be on display. 

Discussion items will include 
methods of expressing the club's 
appreciation to Costner for his 
donation and the coming visit to 
Northwestern of world-famous 
paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey. 

Students of all majors are welcome 
at the meeting and as members of the 
club. 

Black Student 
Association 

The Black Student Association will 
hold the first general meeting of the 
semester at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 
Sept. 4 in Kyser Auditorium. T-shirts 
are now on sale in the BSA office in 
room 1 1 5 Kyser Hall. 
Blue Key 

Blue Key members will meet at 1 1 
a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 10 in the Blue 
Key/Purple Jackets room of the 
Student Union. This is a mandatory 
meeting for all members. For more 
details, call William Winter, Kanat 
Ransi or Bobby Gunn. 
Purple Jackets 

Purple Jackets will hold their first 
meeting of the year at 1 1 a.m. on 
Thursday, Sept. 5 in room 320 of the 
Student Union. For more information, 
contact Tammie Clary at . 
Sailing and 
Windsurfing Club 

The Sailing and Windsurfing Club 
will meet at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 
Sept. 4 in room 114 on the IM 
building. All interested students are 
welcome to attend. 
Soccer Club 

The NSU Soccer Club will hold an 
organizational meeting at 4 p.m. on 
Thursday, Sept. 5 in room 1 12 of the 
Intramural/Recreation Building. All 
interested students and faculty should 
attend. 

Tryouts for the team will be held at 
4 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 8 on the 
soccer field behind Watson Library. 
An eight-game season begins on 
Saturday, Sept. 21. Games will be 
played against teams such as 
Louisiana State University, McNeese, 
Louisiana Tech and University of 
Southern Louisiana. 
Student Government 
Association 

The Student Government 
Association is now accepting 
applications for five senator-at-large 
positions and 10 class senators, two 
from each class and two graduate 
students. Anyone interested in the 
positions should pick up an 
application in the SGA office, located 
in room 222 of the Student Union. 

Chartered organizations will soon 
receive ballots for Mr. and Miss NSU 
and Homecoming nominations in the 
mail. 

The election dates for SGA 
positions, Mr. and Miss NSU and 
Homecoming Court are Wednesday, 
Sept. 18 and Thursday, Sept. 19. 
Tri Beta 

All members of Tri Beta are 
encouraged to attend a meeting at 1 1 
a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 4 in room 114 
Kyser Hall. Officer elections will be 
held. 



premature babies that required 
extensive medical care and resulted 
in medical costs of over $1,000,000. 

The project has reduced maternity- 
newborn costs for the company by 
almost 90 percent, dropping from an 
average of $27,000 per pregnancy to 
$3,500 per pregnancy. 

Since the project began in 1987, 
only one premature birth has occurred 
out of the 130 births recorded by 
plant employees and their immediate 
families. 

"The program has been a very 
positive, very successful program," 
said Joe Taylor, manager at 
Sunbeam's Coushatta plant for the 
past 10 years. "The employees have 
been appreciative of the program and 



have let us know it. The program has 
resulted in more healthy babies and 
that's what we wanted to 
accomplish." 

No work-related factors were found 
to cause the premature births so 
researchers had to find other causes. 
Thompson said two factors played a 
role in the numberof prematurebirths. 

"One problem was a lack of 
education. The women didn't 
understand the pregnancy process," 
said Thompson. "They did not seek 
early prenatal care because they 
thought pregnancy was a normal 
process. They avoided seeing a 
physician until it was nearly time to 
deliver, about five to six months into 
the pregnancy. The nearest physician 



for them was 50-60 miles away in 
Shreveport. 

"The second problem was early 
access to prenatal care. We set up 
prenatal care classes twice a month 
on company time." 

The classes cover a variety of topics 
including diet, nutrition, substances 
to avoid, rest and exercise along with 
problems of pregnancy and pregnancy 
danger signs. The classes involve 
both the expectant mothers and their 
spouses. . 

"The classes have been beneficial 
from a physical and emotional 
standpoint," said David Allen, the 
plant's head nurse. "Physically, 
they've helped by teaching a lifestyle 
that's important to having a healthy 



child. And emotionally, it's important 
because the employees know that 
they're working for a company that 
cares about them." 

The expectant mothers are also 
given instruction on caring for a child 
along with information on 
contraception. 

As part of the program, home 
pregnancy kits were purchased. 
Thompson said the women would 
not buy the kits figuring they would 
know if they were pregnant in a few 
weeks 

The project was chosen to be 
featured on World News Tonight 
because of the role played by 
Northwestern in meeting a need in 
rural Louisiana. 



5 freshmen receive Morrison Award 

Business majors get $200 scholarships towards expenses 



Five incoming freshmen at 
Northwestern State University, 
LaJanitis Brown o f Houma, Eric 
Dutile of Natchitoches, Freda Glaze 
of Leesville, Jerry Guy nes of Atlanta, 
La., and Michael Riley of Buckeye, 
have been named recipients of the 
Noble B. Morrison Business Award. 

The award is named for Morrison, 
who was head of the business 
department at NSU for 35 years from 
1930 until 1965. 

Each recipient of the award will 
receive $200 to help offset the costs 
of tuition, books and other expenses. 
Funds for the award are made possible 
by an endowment set up by friends 
and alumni of the Division of 
Business. 



Brown attended Terrebonne High 
School where she served as student 
council representative and vice- 
president of the school's Students 
Against Drunk Driving chapter. She 
also received academic awards in 
science and English and was a 
member of the National Honor 
Society. 

Dutile, a graduate of Natchitoches 
Central High School, was active in 
the Future Business Leaders of 
America. He served on the Mayor's 
Youth Council and was an academic 
all-district selection in football. 

Glaze was FBLA historian at 
Leesville High School and was chosen 
to Who's Who Among American 
High School Students. 



A graduate of Atlanta High School, 
, Guynes was named "Most Likely to 
Succeed." He received the Winn 
Parish Scholars' Award and was his 
class valedictorian. Guynes won 
several District Literary Rally awards, 
served as sophomore and junior class 
president and was active in FBLA. 
Riley was class valedictorian at 



Buckeye High School and was active 
in the National Beta Club, French 
Club and American Red Cross Youth 
Organization. He also participated in 
the District Literary Rally. 



SAB sponsor 
fall welcome 



The Northwestern Stud 
Activities Board welcomed stud< 
back for the fall semester win 
variety of activities during "Welcn 
Week 1991" which lasted from J\ 
25-30. 

The week started off Aug. 25 
an ice cream social at Iberville Dij 
Hall. The social was sponsored 
SAB, the Natchitoches Chambei 
Commerce and the City 
Natchitoches. 

The fun continued on Aug. 26n 
a "Party Like Crazy in The All 
dance which was held in The Alle 
the Friedman Student Union, w 
the comedy "Back to School" sel 
theme for movie night on Aug. J 

Comedian Kier, billed as 
comedian with a personality probl 
appeared in The Alley on the nig! 
Aug. 28, and a photo button t* 
and "You Can Be a Star" recori 
studio was set up outside the Stui 
Union on Aug. 29. 

The week finally concluded 
Aug. 30 when the Hurricane Mo 
Machine was set up in the Iobb 
the Student Union. 



Yearbook Staff 

For anyone interested in becoming 
a part of the Potpourri staff, an 
organizational meeting will be held 
at 1 1 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5 in 
room 225 Kyser Hall. 



Iltai'i M lUy God. 





STYLE NO. 



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Sign Up NOW For Intramural Flag Football 



First 20 Team Captains to enter a Team 
will receive a Leisure Activities Squeeze Bottle 



Registration Deadline 
Wednesday, September 18th, 5:00pm 



Sign Up in the Leisure Activities Office 
Room 10, Intramural/Recreation Building 
More Info. Call 357-5461 






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"It You Don't Know Jewekv, 
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Good For 1 Weekd 




126 Highway 1 South-Natchitocfm. U. 714W 



Telephone 352-* 




Woly Cross Chufcli 

The Catholic Community at Northwestern State University 

^%lcome 
cftudents !!! 



"Please do not pass by my home without 
stopping; I am here to serve you. Let me bring 
some water for you to wash your feet; you can 
rest here beneath this tree I will also bring a 
bit of food; it will give you strength to continue 
your journey. You have honored me by coming 
to my home, so let me serve you. " 

-Genesis 18:3 ff. 



129 Second Street, one block 
from the university gates. 
352 - 2615 




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Page 6 



News 



September 3, 19<g e pte m ber 



Guilfoyle joins 

journalism 

department 

By SHELLEY GENRE 
Staff Writer 

Pete Guilfoyle, NSU's new 
journalism instructor, has begun the 
school year as head of the 
broadcasting division of the 
journalism department. 

His teaching philosophy is based 
on the old adage of "learning by 
doing." 

"Interns should allow students to 
experience all phases of broadcasting 
news. Students should be put into as 
real life situations as much as 
possible," said Guilfoyle. 

A graduate and former instructor 
of Virginia Commonwealth 
University, Guilfoyle has plans to 
begin a news and cultural affairs 
program to be aired on public 
broadcast systems stations with the 
cooperation of NSU's journalism 
department. The idea came from the 
aprogram entitled "Commonwealth," 
which he participated at VCU, he 
said. 

After graduating with a bachelor's 
and master's degree in television 
broadcasting, Guilfoyle spent two 
years at VCU teaching documentary 
in broadcasting and basic 
newswriting, while also working as 
the head of the internship program. 

"Coming to Northwestern State 
University has been a unique 
opportunity for me," Guilfoyle 
said."It has given me the chance to 
get out of Virginia for a while and 
also to lay out the groundwork for the 
next person. I'm also getting to 
continue my research down here." 

After spending a year at NSU, 
Guilfoyle plans to continue his 
education at the University of Notre 
Dame while working on a doctorate 
in national affairs. 

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LSC student works diligently on Chopin project pOO< 



Halliburton pursues 
interest inwomen's 
studies through 
NEH grant 



Author Kate Chopin had the choice 
of writing for herself or writing to be 
published, and she chose publication. 
That choice doesn't diminish the 
quality of her work, according to a 
Northwestern State University 
student studying Chopin's writings. 

Daniela Halliburton, a junior in the 
Louisiana Scholars' College at 



Northwestern, is studying Chopin 
under a grant from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. 
Chopin spent approximately five 
years writing in Natchitoches Parish. 

"Her stories would end with a twist 
at the end. The whole plot would 
change in the last page or paragraph." 
said Halliburton. "There's something 
sentimental in her work. In some of 
her writings, she was catering to local 
audiences. She was writing to be 
published, and there's nothing wrong 
with that." 

Halliburton, a graduate of Bolton 
High School in Alexandria, is nearing 
the end of her research. She is relying 



on the resources of the Cammie Henry 
Research Center at Watson Library 
for her research. 

"There is so much interesting 
information to go through," said 
Halliburton. "It makes it fun to begin 
researching when you don't know 
what you may find. 

"It's hard to tell what's in there. I 
hope I can find what I'm looking for. 
I'm not expecting any real surprises 
since other authors have been through 
there. But I hope to find some useful 
material." 

Halliburton' s project "Women and 
Social Mores in Kate Chopin's Cane 
River Fiction" started in her LSC 



Southern Fiction class. 

"I've known about Chopin's work 
for a while, and I was interested in 
doing work in the field. The two just 
merged." she said. "Chopin is now 
enjoying more critical attention. It's 
a narrow field for research, and I'm 
interested in women's studies. I 
couldn't resist." 

Halliburton hopes to focus on 
women's studies at graduate school 
after finishing her studies at LSC. 

"Women's studies applies to all 
disciplines. It lets you see things 
from another perspective. It tries to 
open up how you look at things," said 
Halliburton. Chopin's work 



began to gain more acclaim nationiy CHRIS McGI 

and internationally as the wom^o-E^ itor 

movement began to take f , jn football, trend 

Halliburton said. glorious, obsci 

ristence, an assignr 
"She wrote about a self-assy * t seize the fan 

heroine who asserted herself in r?.. 



^lamorP 05 ' 1 ' " sue! 
'Around the Nortl 
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C ° nS,d Vnsive line have 
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TheDemonsenten 
jgson boasting one i 

r*.Ka re nCole,a SsisI »n,p,of R ^™ 
of English and American literatur 
the Scholars' College, is assisi 
Halliburton in the project. 



Awakening ," said Halliburton, 
was about a woman who left 
husband and was 
scandalous at the time (1899). 
now one of the core texts in 
women's movement." 




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Sports 



Page 7 



ject Groodwin unsure of lines as football season begins 



serted herself in 
aid Halliburton, 
/oman who left 
was considei 
tie time (1899). 
le core texts in 
ment." 



ollege, is assis 
he project. 



oreacclaimnation^y CHRIS McGEE 

lally as the worn? -E ditor 

:gan to take fo, jj football, trench warfare is an 

d. glorious, obscure means of 

•utence, an assignment that usually 
about a self-assu « s sejze the fans , attemion Ukfi 

sprtpft hprsplf in • ^ s . . , , , 

glamor position such as quarterback, 
^ound the Northwestern camp, 
iwever, both the offensive and 
fensive line have Demon coach 
a m Goodwin's full attention. 
•j^eDernonsenterthe 1991 football 
jgson boasting one of the Southland 
le.assistantprofe, inference's most gifted collection 

American literatur \*® P lavers and P ossess one of 
t jvision 1-AA s most imposing corps 

f linebackers, but concern over the 

picture has effectively 

)unterbalanced any euphoria. 

Gone is last year's entire starting 

efensive line, including All- 



inic 




American defensive end Greg 
Necaise. Offensive line departures 
include All-American center John 
King and All-SLC guard Sean 
Freeman. In their place Goodwin will 
plug a group of players brandishing 
potential, but growing pains may 
occur. 

Senior Harlan Hughes (6-0, 244) 
will fill the vacancy at center. Senior 
Bill Britt (6-1, 261) and sophomore 
Curtis Wilkins (6-0, 260) will be the 
guards with senior Bo Milton (6-1, 
275) and sophomore Marcus Spears 
(6-2, 302) lining up as tackles. 

The rest of the offense looks armed 
and dangerous. Jitterbug Brad Brown, 
a 5-9 junior, returns to choreograph 
the Demon attack after becoming the 
first quarterback to lead the Demons 
in rushing, picking up 843 yards last 



year. Redsh'irt freshman Chris 
Gilliam, sophomore A.J. Moranto and 
true freshman Brad Laird from 
powerful Ruston High could all figure 
into the scramble. Laird has impressed 
Goodwin with apoise usually foreign 
to an athlete fresh out of high school. 

A new wrinkle to the Demon 
offense this year is a one-back, 
double-wing formation Goodwin has 
installed at times in the preseason. 
Sophomore Deon Ridgell is listed as 
the number one A-back. Other figures 
in the running back committee include 
Guy Hedrick, Randy Wright, Kelvin 
Pierre and James McKellum. Walk- 
on freshman fullback Deron Reed 
impressed observers in a scrimmage 
Thursday, rushing 12 times for 45 
yards. 



Northwestern' s receivers may be 
peerless in the SLC. All-SLC flanker 
John Tappin, who runs a 9.58-second 
100-yard dash, and senior Victor 
Robinson are threats to scald the best 
of defensive backs. 

"We've got to get Tap the ball 
more this year," says Goodwin. "We 
figure at least one out of every four 
times he has it, he'll make something 
big happen. We want to get him the 
ball 8 to 10 times per game, and we 
think our point production will 
climb." 

Sophomore Steve Brown, junior 
Carlos Jones and junior college 
transfer Lawann Latson should fan 
the flames as receivers. Tight end 
Carlos Treadway returns from a back 
injury to status as an All-American 
candidate. 



Entering fall practice, the defensive 
line was the Demons' chief concern, 
but things are starting to come 
together, albeit slowly. 

Senior George Salsberry (6- 1 , 254) 
leads an inexperienced front four that 
also includes 6-0, 230 lb. sophomore. 
Rodney King at tackle and senior 
Anthony Kelly C5- 1 1 , 249) and junior 

Eric Goldman (6-3, 253) as ends. 
Anthony Land, Antonio Lairy, 
Marcus Crider and Frank Jabbia will 
supply depth. 

If enemy ball-toters penetrate the 
Demon defensive line, they will have 
hellish fury awaiting them. 
Consensus All-American linebacker 
Andre Carron, a 6-0, 230-pound 
senior, bench presses 450 pounds and 
devours running backs for a hobby. 
Sophomore middle linebacker Ed 



Moses is a burgeoning star and a 
Carron clone, and senior outside 
linebacker Randy Bullock packs a 
wallop. 

Junior cornerback Adrian Hardy 
and All-SLC second team safety Rob 
Floyd headline a formidable 
secondary that also includes Fred 
Thompson, ChadMcDavid and Jarvis 
Conic. 

Last year's kicking woes may be 
nothing more than a distant memory. 
Freshman place kicker Jason 
Fernandez of Southlake, Texas, 
earned first-team Parade All- 
American status last year and spurned 
heavyweights such as Southern Cal 
and Miami to sign with the Demons. 
Freshman Shane Stephens will handle 
the punting chores. 



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Page 8 



Sports 



September 3, 199 



McCalister believes in '91 volleyball team combination 




By JON TERRY 
Sports Editor 

After several consecutive seasons 
of disappointment on the court, NSU 
Lady Demon volleyball coach Rickey 
McCalister may just have the 
combination that could go somewhere 
this year — a good mixture of 
experience and youth and plenty of 
power. 

Three seniors and four other 
experienced players return from last 
year to anchor McCalister' s squad. 



while seven freshmen, including one 
walk-on, will hopefully cure the 
recurring depth problem and add some 
possible starters. 

Depth and power have definitely 
been a problem for McCalister in the 
last couple of years. Every time he 
had one, he seemed to be lacking in 
the other. Sickness and injury have 
destroyed his last two seasons. But 
this year should be different. 

While no definite starting line-jp 
yet exists, three stabilizing forces in 



the upcoming year's first six will be 
senior setter Sandy Sherrill, senior 
middle blocker Janice Graham and 
junior outside hitter Claire Gilmartin. 
Another big piece of the puzzle will 
be senior outside hitter Kelly Banks. 

Other returning experience comes 
in the forms of junior middle-blocker 
Monica Matthieu, junior outside- 
hitter Amy Haslitt and sophomore 
hitter Michelle Guidry. 

McCalister's new additions to the 
squad include setter Jeri Lyn 



Dusenbery , middle-blockers Jennifer 
Jannak, Karen Hill and Susan Baxter, 
and outside hitters Carrie Shirley, 
Shera Dowell, and surprise walk-on 
Monique Babin. 

"Monique has shown a lot of 
potential on the court," said 
McCalister of the hitter from 
Opelousas. "She is a very competitive 
player and has a good attitude." 

Speaking of his freshmen as a 
group, McCalister says.'They're 
great kids with great attitudes who 



know how to play the game. Two of 
three of them could start. I'm very 
impressed with the progress of the 
new players, especially Shera Dowell, 
Jeri Lyn Dusenbery and Jennifer 
Jannak." 

With a large team showing a lot of 
strength, one problem is picking a 
starting six. While Sherrill, Graham 
and Gilmartin are almost guaranteed 
starts, the other three spots are still 
completely up in the air. 

Sherrill isaseniorwho has shattered 



almost every assist record \ 
university had. The Grand Praii 
Texas native is the only conferer« 
ranked player to return, havi 
finished fourth in service aces ; 
sixth in assists. McCalister \ 
definitely expect her to turn up asi 
leader of the pack. 

Graham, who hails from Carenc 
is the top returning blocker, havj 
already made the record books in tl 

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r3, 199 



Page 9 



Lon 

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Is from Carenc 
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Page 10 



Sports 



September 3, 199 Septet 



Annual tennis 
tournament 
set Friday 

By PAUL PICKERING 
Staff Writer 

The Northwestern Tennis 
Complex will be the center of 
attention this weekend when the 
second annual Foy Motors/Lady 
Demon Classic tennis tournament 
kicks off Friday. 

The tournament, which donates 
all proceeds to the Lady Demon 
tennis team, will offer men's and 
women's singles and doubles, as 
well as mixed doubles competition . 
The men's open singles will be 
highl ighted by the play of last year' s 
champion, ex-Northwestern tennis 
star Willie Paz. Unfortunately, last 
year's runner-up, Richard Pearson 
of Pineville, was killed earlier this 
year in a car accident. 

Last fall's inaugural tournament 
gave a big boost to local tennis and 
provided much-needed funds for 
the university tennis team. Last 
year's event also helped renew 
enthusiasm by attracting quality 
players from all over noith and 
central Louisiana. 

"I expect this year's turn-out to 
be even better," said Bob Morrow, 
tournament director. 

Entry fees for the three-day 
competition are $ 1 8 per person for 
one event and $30 per person for 
two events. This includes a Lady 
Demon Classic T-shirt, as well as 
juice and balls. There will also be a 
lunch cookout on Saturday. 

The Natchitoches Health and 
Racquet Club will provide shower 
facilities along with television 
coverage of the LSU vs. Georgia 
football game Saturday afternoon. 
Trophies will be awarded for first, 
second and consolation in every 
division. 

The deadline for entry is today at 
5 p.m. For more information call 
Morrow at 357-8277 or Dannie 
Collins at 357-1262. 



• Continued from page 8 

Volleyball team 
set for season 

category. She is also the top returning 
hitter. 

Gilmartin has been plagued by 



injury and disease for two years now, 
and Coach McCalister is hoping to 
keep her healthy long enough to help 
the team. In her first match two years 
ago, she had 25 kills, and compiled a 
.256 attack percentage in the eight 
matches she did play last year. 

Of the other experienced players, 
Kelly Banks is the most consistent 
when she isn't out with injuries, but 



Monica Matthieu and Amy Haslitt 
are progressing quickly, and could 
easily see starting time. 

"Juniors Monica Matthieu and 
Amy Haslitt, who spent most of last 
season filling relief roles, have really 
developed and will certainly see 
plenty of action this fall," said 
McCalister. "Claire Gilmartin is 
showing strength not only with hard 



PhiMu 

Has got 
Something 
to Roar 
about. 



Congratulations to the 
Fall Pledge Class 




Shelia Banes 
Jennefer Birdwell 
Tiffany Bono 
Alicia Brown 
Christine Canada 
Jauxniece Childress 
Lisa Cisneros 
Kimberly Fisher 
Marie Gipe 
Karen Hall 
Molly Hammond 
Angela Hennigan 
Susan Henry 
Shanna Holton 
Amy Howell 
Erin Jesse 
Dacia Johnson 
Kimberly Jones 
Chris Knighted 
Angela La Cour 
Kristi Lee 



Scarlett Longlois 
Laura McCain 
Kelly Mitchell 
Deanna Odum 
Jill Parker 
Amy Pelt 
Bridget Plaisance 
Amy Puissegur 
Ginger Reeves 
Melanie Schadwell 
Wendi Seals 
Mikelyn Smith 
Susanna Smith 
Cesely Stewart 
Candace Temple 
Renee Thibodeaux 
Cami Weir 
Christina Welch 
Raquel Wiley 
Whitney Willis 
Holly Willrodt 



Leah Long 

Any questions call - 
Ginny Mix 352 - 7289 
Alison Bexley 352 - 7289 
Tracy Favre 357 - 4543 



hitting but also in playing defense on 
the front row. 

"The squad is really developing 
well," McCalister said. "There will 
not be a dominant starting six in the 
first part of the season. There is no 
definite starting six currently, except 
for the seniors, Sandi Sherrill, Janice 
Graham, and Kelly Banks." 

One big problem on the schedule, 



however, is the serious lack of 
matches. Only 10 matches wj 
played at home, while 15 mad 
plus two tournaments are on the* 
Definitely a situation where that J 
will come in handy, as lots of A 
will make for tired players. 

The Lady Demon season willy 
Saturday with a road trip to ArkaJ 
Little Rock for a 3 p.m. match. 1 



Become a student of the world J 

Spend a year or a semester abroad for about the same cost as staying at home. Over 1(J 

sites in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Canada, Europe and Latin America offer 
undergraduate and graduate programs in fields such as architecture, communications 
engineering, fine arts, the humanities, international business, law, languages, 

and natural and social sciences. 

Through the International Student Exchange Program, you are directly enrolled in a 
foreign institution and receive academic credit toward your degree program at home, 
You are totally immersed in a new culture and language, not in an isolated study 
program for U.S. students and taught by U.S. professors. 

Join the more than 6,300 ISEP students who have made the world their university. 

For more information, contact your ISEP coordinator today! 

Tom Whitehead 
Northwestern International Programs 
Room 103 Kyser Hall, 357-5213 

The International Student Exchange Program is a fully reciprocal exchange plan funde 
in part by the United States Information Agency under the Fulbright-Hays Act of 196: 



Two O 
The Bi 
Activit 
than IS 
Studen 
that da 



Spend a Year in Japan! 

The Japan Exchange and Teaching Program 

The JET Program needs you. 

The Japan Exchange and Teaching Program is an international exchange opportunity through which colki 
graduates and young professionals are invited to Japan to share their native language and culture with 
Japanese youth. The program offers a unique chance to serve as an assistant English teacher in both the 
public and private schools; and to serve in local Japanese governments, helping with international activitk 

Applicants must be U.S. citizens; hold at least a bachelor's degree or receive one by August 1992; speak am 
write English well; be able to adapt to living and working conditions different from those at home; and be 
35 years of age or under (as of August 1992). 

Applications for 1992-93 positions must be submitted no later than December 20, 1991, and are available 
through the Embassy of Japan and local Japanese Consulates. For further information contact : 

Consulate General of Japan 
JET Program 
639 Loyola Avenue, Suite 2050 
New Orleans, LA 70113 

(504) 529-21 01 



The St 
their A 
the Sti 
organi; 
the SA 



SAE 

men 



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you get the difference back in cash. Simple, That's it! 

The ideal gift from parents, grandparents, relatives and 
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1. It can be a complete semester meal plan In itself. 

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3. Cash back on unused amount of coupon-purchase for other 
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Phone 357-OZlO 





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Open Monday thru Saturday 
10:00 A.M. - 10:OOP.M. 
and 
Sundays 
3:00P.M. - 10:00P.M. 




■ 



10% Discount for all NSU and LSMSA Students! PLUS Note a 10% Senior CitUen Discount! 



BREAKFAST 








Large Breakfast 




3.25 




(Eggs, Bacon and Sausage or Toast) 






Sausage Biscuit 




.99 




Grilled Honey Bun 




.60 




Pancakes (2) 




2.10 




. (With choice of Bacon or Sausage] 








LUNCH 


Reg. 


Lrg. 


DM. 


Hamburger 


1.59 


1.79 


2.55 


Cheeseburger 


1.69 


1.99 


2.75 


Bacon C/Burger 


2.35 


2.65 


2.85 


BBQ (Chipped Beef) 


1.80 






B.L.T. 


1.75 






j Homemade Meat Pies ' 


135 






Hot Dog 


.95 






Com Dog 


1.00 






Hot Link 


.95 






Chili Dog 


125 






Chicken Cheese Sand. 


1.95 






Roast Beef 


2.25 






Taco Salad 


3.49 






Ham-N-Cheese 


275 






Grilled Chicken Sand. 


1.95 






Ribeye Sandwich 


3.95 






Chef Salad 


325 






Steak Sandwich 


1.85 






Chicken Sandwich 


1.50 






Po Boy/ Ham or Beef 


2.50 


" » 




SIDE ORDERS 


Bsfi 


Lrg. 




French Fries 


.70 


.95 




Cajun Fries 


1.10 


1.25 




tOnion Rings 


1.25 






"Curty Q/s 


.95 






j Tator Tots 


.85 


1.10 


fj 


Hot Gumbo 
Hot Chili 


1.75 
1.75 








Hot Boudin 

Red Beans and Rice } '. 


1.25 
2.95 


t * * 








j FritoPies 


130 






Chili Fries 


1.75 






Chips 


30 






Nachos 


.99 







MEAL DEALS 

Kid's Meal 1.99 

(Hamburger, fries, & Drink) 

Ribeye Dinner 439 

Meat Pie Dinner 330 

Chicken Strip Dinner 330 

Catfish Dinner 5.95 

(Cole Slaw, Hush Puppies, & Fries) 

Burger Basket 330 

Shrimp Basket 355 

Steak Finger Basket 330 



BEVERAGES 

Tea. Coke, Diet Coke, Orange, 

Dr. Pepper 

Milk 

Hot Coffee 
Hot Cocoa 
MilkShakes 
Fresh Lemonade 
Ice 



Sm. Reg. lg. 

.70 JS 1.00 

1.00 

25 

AS 

.95 130 

.70 .85 1.00 
.99 



DESSERTS 

Cheese Caked slice) 

Funnel Cake 

Mom's Cinnamon Roll 



1.10 
130 
130 



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X" 



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/Lg HB, FF and I602 DrinKf 
2.89 + tax 



904 College Avenue 



[ 



r3, 199 September 3, 1991 



p age 1 1 



ious lack of (J 
I matches wjK 
vhile 15 maw 
us are on the J 
n where that* 
i, as lots of m 
players, 
i season will \ 
dtriptoArkaj] 
p.m. match. 



e. Overli 
offer 

unication^ 
uages, 



rolled in a 
n at home.| 
sd study 



liversity. 



SEPTEMBER 3, 1991 



Positions 
Open 



Two Committee Chairpersons positions are open. Cinema Focus and Lady of 
The Bracelet will be voted on at the September 17th meeting of the Student 
Activities Board. All interested persons must fill out an application no later 
than 12:00 pm. September 17 in the Stuent Activities Office in the Friedman 
Student Union. All applicants must be present at the 4:00 SAB meeting on 
that day. 



Leadership 
Workshop 




on your next prescription 




)lan funde 
to of 196l! 



The Student Activites Board and Student Government Association is holding 
their Annual Student Leaders Leadership Workshop September 6th - 7th in 
the Student Union. All Presidents and Vice Presidents of charted campus 
organizations are invited and encouraged to attend. For more details stop by 
the SAB or the SGA office in the Student Union. 



SAB Leadership Workshop September 8th. All SAB 
memebers must be in attendance. 




which collet 
urewith 
both the 
>nal activitk 

12; speak an< 
>me; and be 



available 



5 



I* 

if) 
w 



ount! 



1.00 



1.50 
1.00 



ister 

Soz DrinK 
9 + tax 





IN THE ALLEY 

flCflDf/AT AWARD WinniHO 



HI * * 
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You can save big money on your 
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filled with a generic at Causey's 
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can help you. 

Anita is an experienced, 
registered pharmacist and she 
can answer all of your questions 
and tell you which medicines can 
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And she can also save you a lot 
of money, because you get the 
same medicine as the brand 
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So, bring all of your 
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407 BIENVILLE, 352-31-41 



8:00 PM 




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REGULAR 
PRICE 

4,77 
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3.99 
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INTO THE GREAT WIDE OPEN 

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11.99 1~ 

12.99 <^r/r^l 
12.99 * 1 1 H | J 



*2.00 OFF 

All Compact Discs 
priced $16.00 & higher 



Sale prices good Aug. 29 thru Sept. 15 
All Items already on sale are not included. 



{A/fy/to Video) 

Your Movie & Music Source. 



242 Keyser Av8„ Natchitoches, (318)357-8056 



IMPORTANT MESSAGE 
FOR STUDENTS 

FROM THE 

NATCHITOCHES 
HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB 



YOU may join from sept thru December for only 

$100.00. 
(That includes tax & entry fee.) 
All you have to do is pay up front. With this great 
special, you may use racquetball, basketball, aerobics, 
weights, stairclimbers and we have men s and 
women's dressing rooms and protein bar. 

IF you want to pay by the month: 

$25.00 entry fee $22.50 a month (semester contract) 



WE ARE IN WALKING DISTANCE FROM ANYWHERE 

ON CAMPUS 

LOCATED ACROSS FROM NSU 



400 College Avenue 
357-0936 



Open 7 Days 
a Week 



w^gsrj^i v ,iLbMi»«ii mm* 



Page 12 



Lifestyle 



September 3,19 




140 rushees take sororities by storm, 107 women pledge§eas 



By TINA M. FORET 
Staff Writer 

All was quiet on Greek Hill. Three 
weeks ago, a strange stillness fell 
upon the sorority houses. Suddenly, 
they came out of nowhere. A color- 
coded cavalry stormed upon Greek 
Hill. Their mission: sorority rush. 

On Aug. 22, over 1 40 girls reported 
for fall rush. With an onslaught of 
107 pledges, fall rush numbers 
increased from the past rushes. 

"The retention rate throughout the 
formal rush period was higher than it 
has been in the past five years," said 
Reatha Cole, rush advisor at 
Northwestern. 

The rush week was not an easy 
battle, especially for the sorority 
members. 

"Rush was hectic," said Cindy 



Morrison, vice president of Sigma 
Sigma Sigma. "We stayed at the 
house until 2 and 3 a.m. a couple of 
nights to get everything ready for the 
next rush party." 

However hectic the week was, 
initiated members and new pledges 
believe that their membership in a 
sorority will bring them new 
friendships and active lifestyles. 

"I went through rush to meet people. 
But I especially went through rush to 
get a close group of friends, since I 
live five hours away from home," 
said Karen Hall, Phi Mu pledge. 

"When you pass people on the 
sidewalk, there's always someone to 
say 'Hi', whether its a sister or 
someone you met through rush," said 
ElizabethFallis, Sigma Kappa pledge. 

Sigma Kappa pledges include 



Quincy Adams, Julie Callia, Ashley 
Carroll, Cher Couvillion, Audrey 
Desadier, Becky Ducote, Caelon 
Eubanks, Beth Fallis, Brandy Gold, 
Allison Harvey, Wendy Hicks, Mary 
Nelson, Melissa Ory, Piper Rux, 
Heather Scully, Tara Sharp, Leslie 
Starns, Bonnie Townsend and Stacey 
Woods. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma pledges are 
Shelly Abiatti, Cynthia Beshea, Jill 
Cantreil, Aline Carbo, Robin Conly, 
Paula Daly, Shelly Davis, Ashley 
Demaret, Jennifer Ellzey, Wendy 
Fayard, Roblynn Gass, Amy Gewin, 
Christie Givens, Sarah Harrison, 
Heather Hanners, Angela Hill, Allissa 
Hollenshead, Amy Huddleston, 
Angela Huddleston, Kimberly 
Kennedy, Kathy King, Sabra Lands, 
Melissa Louviere, Melissa Mabou, 



Jamie Maggio, Rebecca Miller, 
Kelsea Moore, Julie Norman, Rachel 
Odum, Jenna Robb, Adriane Robin, 
Jennifer Santoro, Kimberly Taylor, 
Deana Tarpley, Margaret Williams, 
Karen Williamson, Shannon 
Woodson, Christina Yanes, Amy 
Martinez, Pam Long and Shana 
Teitjen. 

The Phi Mu pledge class is Shelia 
Banes, Jennifer Birdwell, Tiffany 
Bono, Alicia Brown, Christine 
Canada, Jauxruece Childress, Lisa 
Cisneros, Kimberly Fisher, Marie 
Gipe, Karen Hall, Molly Hammond, 
Angela Hennigan, Susan Henry, 
Shanna Holton, Amy Howell, Erin 
Jesse, Dacia Johnson, Kimberly 
Jones, Chris Knighten, Angela 
LaCour, Kristi Lee, Leah Long, 



Kelly Mitchell, Deanna Odum, Jill 
Parker, Amy Pelt, Bridget Plaisance, 
Amy Puissegur, Ginger Reeves, 
Melanie Scadwell, Wendi Seals, 
Mikelyn Smith, Susanna Smith, 



Scarlett Longlois, Laura McQ 
Cesely Stewart, Candace Tini| 
Renee Thibodeaux, Cami ty, 
Christina Welch, Raquel Wil 
Whitney Willis and Holly Willm 



Flag football season to open 



The Intramural Program kicks 
off Tuesday, Sept. 10 with the flag 
football officials clinic beginning at 
7p.m. in room 1 14 of the Intramural/ 
Recreation Building. The Leisure 
Activities Department will train 
students to officiate flag football for 
the season which will begin 
Thursday, Sept. 19withapre-season 
tournament. 

No experience is necessary to 



become a flag football offic 
Students completing the trainj 
sessions will be paid $4.25 
game to officiate flag football 

The deadline to enter a 
football team is 5 p.m. Wedne 
Sept. 18. A team captain's meetiu 
for al 1 teams wi 1 1 be held that ni< 
beginning at 7 p.m. in room 1 14 
the IM building. For details, c 
357-5461. 





CTC*) 




coupon coupon coupon coupon 



Buy one yougurt get one 
free with this coupon 
excludes pies, cakes, pints, 
quarts are not to be used 
with another special. 



Expires September 10, 1991 

Catus Corner Shopping Center 



Discover Kinko's. 
You get more than 
just great copies. 

When you're checking out the campus, be sure 
to check out your local Kinko's. You'll find just 
about everything you need to help you complete 
course projects, including... 



S Quality black and white copies 
/ Transparencies. 
S Macintosh® rental, 
S Poster-size copies, 
S Binding, and more! 
y We're open early and 

late, 7 days, to help 

you make those last 

minute due dates! 



kinkes 

the copy center 



352-8155 

510 College 



G 






s 



Coxmtry Lanes 
Bowling M 



CS 93 




Hwy 1 North Bypass 
Rt. 2 Box 100 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 

Open Every Night!!! 
7 Days a Week 
***Specials*** 
Fri Night 1 Opm- 1 am 
Sat Night llpm-2am 
Sun Afternoon 2:30-5: 30pm 
$3 Per Person / 3 per sane minimui ! 



Watch for upcoming 
Friday Night Rock 1 
Bowl !!! 



call 352-9015 for reservation. 



lections 
ir Sept. 

TINA M. FOl 

Writer 
Northwestern s 
.Lee to cast th« 
nators on V 
ursday, Sept. II 
ivemment Assc 
;0 tt Andrews 
iction has been \ 
er campus. 
"We have our si 
the marquis, 
blicized to the s 
s strictly up to t! 
tthey want to tal 
ident governme 
Filings for the p 
Btors and foui 
the SGA clos 
aditionally, onl; 
Khosen to s 
tester. Four po 
large have als 
tethe spring 1" 
bents will not 
Bsenators. but 
Bse candidate 
jtor-at- large p 
B think that e\ 
said Andre 
night; they p 
idem governm 
sse fees go, and 
live interest in 
Last semester 
esidential prim 
tgest with ap{ 
udents voting. C 
•ticipation rang 
"dents voting, 
m out was a su 
"I'd like to se( 
the students ' 
stem of campi 
Hething we're 
id Andrews. 
This semestei 
v "lved in sever; 
tost fund, smc 
A cons), facul 
e month, recyc 
'P e seminar 
la, yzing parkin 
The SGA is cc 
Ejects such 
Urgency stu( 
'Peals , voter rej 
r non-traditio 
"ns. free spei 
"toe book, anc 
"drews. 
"There's too 
* complaining 
:e duresandtl 
c ampus. Wei 
or the way 
is to vot 
'"00 students 
25 can, so 
"meetings. 




INDUCING ETC 



I 



Etc. pizza, pasta and such 



ALL - YOU - CAN - EAT 

(coupon good for up to 4 adults, kids under 10 yrs. $.99) 



* 



Only Our Name Has Changed! 

Mr. Gatti's of Natchitoches Proudly Announces its New Name 



Si 

Si 



Etc. pizza*, pasta and such 

formally MR.GATTI'S 
123 Hwy 1 South Natchitoches 
(on the strip) 



* 



Buffet 7 days a week - twice daily 
Lunch 11 am - 2 pm, and Dinner 5 - 8 pm. 
price does not include $.29 salad bar or soft 

drinks 

Good Thru September 5, 1 991 + 



* 



Oar location hasn't changed. Our customer service is stifl 
the "Best in Town". Our phone number is the same (357 1 
1135). You'll see those same friendly faces and we're 
serving the same great pizza - even better. 



As a special "Thank You" for your past patronage and 
contyinued support, Etc. is offering NSU its same great 
buffet at a special price for 3 days only: This Tues^ Wed* 
and Thurs. 



^jgn dar 
^pujsCo 
^torials 
^style_ 
Ptejn Bri. 
pinions 




' Student i 
^orthwestt 
^itoches, 



[ 




er 



3 i9 ? uper Sports 

pemons Win 



! dgegeason Opener, page 8 



Laura McQ 
Candace Timj 
ux, Cami ty( 
, Raquel Wi| 
d Holly Wilh, 



open 

football offiQ 
Ming the trainj 
: paid $4.25 | 
: flag football 
to enter a 
p.m.Wedne 
captain's mi 
be held that ni| 
m. in room 1 14 
For details, 




Editorial 

Parking A Big 
Problem, page 12 



Lifestyles 

"Boyz N the Hood" 
Reviewed, page 14 





Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

September 10, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 6 



Northwestern State University 



ning 
>ck 1 



Itudents 
.o vote 

-lections set 
ir Sept. 18, 19 

XINAM. FORET 
,/f Writer 

Northwestern students have the 

. uice to cast their vote for class 

nators on Wednesday and 
ursday, Sept. 18 and 19. Student 
ivernment Association President 
ott Andrews reports that the 
ction has been well-publicized all 
er campus. 

"We have our signs up. We have it 
the marquis. It's been widely 
blicized to the student body. Now 
5 strictly up to them as whether or 
tthey want to take an interest in the 
ident government," said Andrews. 
Op jyi Filings for the positions of 1 class 
• • iators and four senators-at-large 

iinimui .fog SGA cl0sed at noon , oday 

aditionally, only 10 class senators 
chosen to serve for the fall 
hester. Four positions for senator- 
large have also become vacant 
fce the spring 1991 election. Thus, 
Bents will not only vote on their 
■senators, but they will be able to 
se candidates to fill the open 
■r-at-large positions also. 
B think that every student should 
1" said Andrews. "They all have 
Jnght; they pay their fees. Hie 
idem government decides where 
ese fees go, and they should take an 
tive interest in it." 
Last semester's turn out for the 
esidential primary was one of the 
rgest with approximately 1.000 
"dents voting. Compared to the past 
irticipation ranging from 500 to 800 
"dents voting, the spring election 
m out was a success. 
"I'd like to see at least 50 percent 
the students vote. It's strictly a 
stem of campus apathy which is 
"nettling we're trying to combat," 
*• Andrews. 

This semester, the SGA will be 
v °lved in several projects including 
^st fund, smoking policies (pros 
^ cons), faculty/staff member of 
'month, recycling campaign, date 
'P e seminar for students and 
la 'yzing parking situations. 
The SGA is constantly working in 
r °jects such as homecoming, 
Agency student loans, traffic 
teals, voter registration, programs 
" n on-traditional students, club 

t^s, free speech forum, student 
* n e book, and crimestopper, said 
Adrews. 

There's too many students that 
ltc °niplaining about policies and 
^edures t affect them 

Campus. Well, the way to change 
tni or the way to make their voice 
is to vote." said Andrews. 
'^0 students can see a lot more 

di ^ 25 can, so that's why we have 

I meetings. We welcome them." 

ew Name 



Investigation 




Parking solution underway 

One of a series of articles on the parking problems at Northwestern and what is being done to solve the congested parking lots. 



By Van Reed, 

Editor and 
Chris Gleason, 

Staff Writer 

"You can't even park illegally anymore," said Brian 
Shirley, a senior journalism major from Natchitoches 
who commutes each day to class. 

Shirley spoke for many students like Valerie Miller, 
who are having problem finding parking spaces in the 
morning. 

"I've been here four years and I've never heard of 
people having as much difficulty with it as they are 
having right now," said Miller, a senior nursing major. 
Congested lots are causing the problems. 

The amount of automobiles parking in open, 
commuter and faculty-staff are exceeding the limits of 
the lots. 

Northwestern Police Chief Rickie Williams says the 
problem is resident students driving to class. 

"I am trying to get the resident fine on tickets up for 
those that are parking in commuter zones," he said. 

Williams wants to raise the fine from $5 to $10. He 
said this might help reduce the flow of resident traffic on 
campus. 

According to Williams, his force is being "a little 
more lenient" with students parking in crowded zones. 
Vehicles will be towed if they are blocking traffic. He 
suggested students consider parking in other lots. 

Williams said there are open parking places at the 
ROTC Building and South Hall by the stadium, Warren 
Easton and at Prather Coliseum. 

Fred Fulton, director of student life, said there is 
plenty of parking on campus. 

"There is an adequate number of parking spaces, it's 
where the spaces are located that turns off students," said 
Fulton. 

Darren Williams, a senior marketing major, said, 
"Living off-campus is Utopia as opposed to living in the 
dorms, but if we want to get a parking spot near class, we 
need to leave the house at roughly midnight." 

Joanie Garner, a Northwestern resident, said, "This 



is a problem that needs a solution." 

But, the administration is working out a several 
solutions to solve the the parking dilemma. The plans 
for a new parking lot between Williamson Hall and 
Bienvenu Hall have been drawn up and are awaiting 
approval from the Board of Trustees and the Board of 
Regents. 

"Our main concern is to make the students happy, 
and so we are trying to build new parking," said Dr. 
James Haley, vice president of university affairs. 

Haley said the parking situation was a problem that 
the administration had not foresee. 

Harold Boutte, chairman of the campus 
beautification committee, said the new lot was underway. 

"We're doing the legwork right now," said Boutte. 
"Consultants are coming in with figures, diagrams and 
the likes to help with the lot." 

According to Boutte, the university has to remove 
underground power lines and pipes before the work can 
begin. He said Northwestern is also hoping Louisiana 
will donate dirt from the Highway 6 construction to the 
project. This would save the university money that 
could be put back into the project. 

Haley said other projects are being proposed to help 
elevate the problem of overcrowded lots. Relaying the 
surface of the lot behind Caspari Hall is one step, Haley 
said, that is being looked investigated. 

"This would make it more convenient for students 
who live in Caspari and provide additional parking," 
said Haley. 

Other aspects of the situation are being looked into. 
Haley said a shuttle service from the coliseum parking 
area the campus' main buildings is just not feasible. He 
said the 1 99 1 -92 budget has already been put into effect 
and there a no funds set aside for a shuttle, but it is 
something to look at next year. 

Boutte said the administration is working hard to 
solve the problem by building the new lot and resurfacing 
the Caspari lot. 

"When we do it, we want to do it right." Boutte said. 



Editor wins appeal 

Administration reinstates Reed 
to position at campus newspaper 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Staff Writer 

After a thorough appeal process, 
the Northwestern administration 
reinstated Van Reed as editor of the 
Current Sauce last week. 

After his grade-point average 
and his eligibility for the editorship 
came under scrutiny, Reed appealed 
to the Student Government 
Association's Media Board to 
restore him to the editor's position. 
The administration instructed Reed 
to relinquish his position for the 
paper's first issue of the semester 
while the appeal process took place. 

"I experienced a situation beyond 
my control. All I asked for was a 
chance to be heard and reconsidered 
for the position," said Reed. 

Northwestern Director of 
Student Life Fred Fulton listed the 
old SGA constitution and the 
unchartered organization status of 
the Current Sauce as guides to 
determining Reed's eligibility. 



"Based on existing university 
policy and the new SGA 
constitution, Van Reed meets the 
written requirements to serve as 
editor of the student publication," 
said Fulton. "At the present time, 
the SGA is in the process of adopting 
their bylaws, which are called for 
by the new constitution. Those 
bylaws will contain an article which 
pertains to the media board, and it is 
anticipated that it will clarify the 
requirements to serve as editor of 
the publication or manager of the 
radio station." 

Fulton said the new 
constitution' s lack of a current clear 
clarification of eligiblity 
requirements for the editorship 
compelled the administration to 
use the old constitution as a guide to 
solve the situation. 

"I am pleased to be back in my 
position. It is what I have worked 
for these past three years," said Reed. 



Leadership workshop 
promotes groupwork 

80 students attend annual event 



By LEONARD WILLIAMS 

Staff Writer 

The third annual Campus 
Leaders Workshop sponsored by 
the Student Activities Board and 
the Student Government 
Association was held last weekend 
to benefit campus organizations. 

In attendance were presidents 
and representatives from various 
campus organizations including the 
marching band and several Greek 
organizations. The purpose of the 
workshop was to foster leadership 
skills in the students who are heads 
of campus organizations that are 
vital to Northwestern. 

Approximately 80 people were 
in attendance at the workshop which 
started with planned activities 
Friday night led by university 
counselors David Ensminger and 
Bridget Poleman. 

The theme for the workshop 
dealt with group dynamics and 
stressing the importance of a group 
of people making decisions rather 
than just one person. Ensminger 
and Poleman led the group through 
some outrageous "get acquainted" 
games that placed the importance 
on working together and building 
group participation. 

Student Activities Board 



Advisor, Carl Henry, provided vital 
information about the meaning of 
what campus organizations 
represent. Henry also reminded 
attendants of the imposing deadline 
for semester renewal cards for 
chartered campus organizations. 
The card lists current information 
about campus organizations and 
must be completed at the beginning 
of each semester. The deadline for 
all cards to be turned is Oct. 1 in 
room 214 of the Student Union. 

All organizations missing this 
deadli ne will be classified as 
inactive for the fall semester and 
will not be allowed to use university 
meeting space in the Student Union 
nor function as a regular university 
organization. This also includes 
holding events or parties in 
university facilities. 

On Saturday, the workshop 
featured lecturer Steve Morgan who 
presented participants with a talk 
on teaching yourself in order to 
teach other people. 

"Overall, his speech made me 
look at myself a lot differently. I 
felt very enlightened," said Shelisa 
Theus, ajunior from Monroe. "The 
workshop in general gave me a 
better understanding of working 
with groups." 



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357-5456 1 



Physics prof joins LSC 

Magri wants to improve science curriculum 



By JENNIFER ROY 

Staff Writer 

Dr. Christopher Magri, the new 
assistant professor of physics in the 
Louisiana Scholars' College, is doing 
his part to make sure that tomorrow ' s 
scientists are well-rounded 
individuals. 

Scholars' College, with the help 
of professors like Dr. Magri, is trying 
improve and develop the current 
science curriculum. The college has 
a successful humanities curriculum 
now, but wants to offer more in the 
areas of math and science. 

The new curriculum, called 
Paradigms of Nature, would be a 



two-year course that would include 
biology, chemistry, physics and 
mathematics. 

Scholars' College currently offers 
biology and chemistry. With the 
addition of Magri and two other 
physicists, physics has been added to 
the course list. The college now has 
to find a qualified mathematician to 
complete the curriculum. 

Magri feels that it is important to 
"do away with the stereotype that 
mathematicians can do math, but can 
not write," and that students in the 
humanities are ignorant about science 
and math. 

According to Magri, the science 



curriculum was started at Scholars' 
College before, but "it just collapsed 
in front of the students because two 
of the four people in the program 
were opposed to mixing it all together. 
They thought that chemists should 
take chemistry and physicists should 
take physics." 

The physics professors at 
Scholars' College are currently 
having to use NorthWestern's 
equipment because they still have to 
devise courses and decide on the 
equipment they need before they can 
receive funds from private, state and 
federal sources. 

■ Please see MAGRI, page 7 




Page 2 



Calendar 



today 

9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Yearbook Pictures taken in 

Rm. 232 of the Student Union. 

7:00 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 

will be held in the IM Building 

7:00 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features 3 
Men & a Little Lady in The Alley 

7:00 p.m. 

Lady Demon Volleyball, 

Demons vs. LA Tech, in Prather 

Coliseum 

WEDNESDAY 

9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Yearbook Pictures 

7:00 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 

THURSDAY 

9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Yearbook Pictures 

11:00 a.m. 

Lecture Series, CNN's John 
Holliman in the Fine Arts Audi- 
torium 

4:00 p.m. 

Lady Demon Volleyball, 

Demons vs. Arkansas Little Rock, 
Prather Coliseum 

5:00 p.m. 

Cross Country Invitational 

7:00 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 
FRIDAY 

9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Yearbook Pictures 

SATURDAY 

1 p.m. 

Demon Football 

The Demons travel to Nevada 

Reno. 

MONDAY 

3:00 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 

in the IM Building 



News In Brief 



■ Nursing students must 
take exam 

Any nursing student who 
plans to petition to enroll in 
clinical in January 1992 must take 
the National League for Nursing 
Exam from noon to 4:30 p.m. on 
Friday, Sept. 20 in room 108 of 
Williamson Hall. The test will also 
be given in Shreveport on 
Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 1 1 
and 12. 

Please bring a $20 certified 
check or money order. No personal 
checks or cash will be accepted. A 
pictured ID will also be required. If 
you have any questions, come by 
the Nursing Office in room 101 of 
the Home Economics Building or 
call 357-6776. 

■ Natchitoches/ 
Northwestern Chorale 
names new conductor 

Phyllis Sahadi, associate 
professor of voice at Northwestern, 
will be the new conductor of the 
Natchitoches/Northwestern 
Chorale for the 1991-92 season. 

The first chorale rehearsal will 
be at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12 
in the choral room located on the 
first floor of the A.A. Fredericks 
Creative and Performing Arts 
Center. Course credit is available 
for those interested. 

Time will be set aside during 
each rehearsal to give singers a 
chance to get better acquainted 
with others who share similar 
interests. 

Four other works which 
feature big choir sound are planned 
during the season. Also slated to be 
performed are "Salvation is 
Created" by Tschesenoff, 
"Beautiful River" by John Rutter, 
'Then Will the Very Rocks Cry 
Out" arranged by Mark Hayes and 
a new arrangement of "His Truth is 
Marching On" (Battle Hymn of the 
Republic) by Bob Drogstad. 

Concert dates will be 
announced later. 

For more information, contact 
Sahadi at 357-5762 or 352-4456. 




CNN's John Holliman will speak Thursday at 1 1 :00 in the Fine Arts Auditorium 



■ Professional business 
ethics seminar to be held 

Northwestern's Small Business 
Development Center will be 
offering a Professional Business 
Ethics Seminar on Saturday, Sept. 
21 in the President's Room of the 
Friedman Student Union. 

Sign in for^he seminar will be 
from 8 to 8:30 a.m. The 
presentation will be from 8:30 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. 

The seminar will involve a 
discussion of the accounting 
profession and its importance to the 
business world. The seminar will 
include a discussion of the principle 
of the AICPA. 

Four CPE credits are awarded 
for participation in the seminar. 

Instructor for the seminar will 
be Dr. Glen Cooley, who currently 
teaches financial, managerial, 
intermediate, cost and tax 
accounting at Northwestern's Fort 
Polk campus. 

The fee for the seminar is $30 
before Friday and $35 after Friday. 
For more information, contact the 
Northwestern Small Business 
Development Center at 357-561 1. 



■ Adults with Seniority 
Conference sponsored by 
Continuing Education 

Northwestern's Division of 
Continuing Education and the 
Natchitoches Chamber of 
Commerce's Retirement 
Development Committee will co- 
sponsor an Adults with Seniority 
Conference on Saturday, Sept. 28 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the 
Friedman Student Union. 

According to Dr. Gordon 
Coker, director of Northwestern's 
Division of Continuing Education, 
topics to be covered in the morning 
session include the challenge of 
retirement, health and safety, 
insurance, benefits, housing and 
travel. 

In the afternoon, topics 
available include sources of income, 
finances and legal affairs. 

Conference participants will 
learn about preparing for life after 
retirement, benefits of living in 
Natchitoches and organizations and 
services available in Natchitoches. 

Approximately 30 
organizations from the Natchitoches 
area will have displays set up in the 



Student Union Lobby from 3 to 5 
p.m. for participants to receive 

information. 

Also included in the 
conference is a ticket to Saturday 
night's Northwestern football game 
against East Texas, which kicks off 
at 7 p.m. 

The cost of the conference is 
$ 1 5 and is open to anyone over age 
50. 

For more information, contact 
Northwestern's Division of 
Continuing Education at 357-4570. 

■ Northwestern for 
economic/community 
development program 

Northwestern has been 
selected as one of eight universities 
nationwide to participate in the 
American Association of State 
Colleges and Universities' 
economic/community development 
program, according to 
Northwestern President Dr. Robert 
A. Alost. 

The winning proposal was 
prepared by Dr. Barry Smiley, 
director of Northwestern's Small 
Business Development Center. The 
program with AASCU is made 
possible, in part, through Exxon 
Education Foundation Funds. 

The AASCU Selection 
Committee chose institutions that 
showed a high level of commitment 
to undertaking economic/ 
community development activities 
and were representative of their 
total membership as a whole. 

AASCU will assist by 
collecting and analyzing data bout 
the economic and community 
development activities of 
Northwestern and the community, 
determining the appropriate starting 
point in AASCU's starting process 
and completing a process design 
plan. 

Consultants will be visiting 
Northwestern on Thursday and 
Friday, Sept. 26 and 27 to meet 
with campus and community 
leaders to establish the parameters 
of the project. 



September IM^ber 1 




Currei 

SaucfjCam 



ce ball te 

P.O. Box 8630 , . 

North weitern Stat* Univenjj Wal* 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 7149 orth* es,ern sl 
(ups 140-660) Jidat 1:30p.m. 

on the baseb; 
Lhaveadocto 
How to reach the Sauo for more infc 

To subscribe to The Sauq i ir 

Subscriptions 357-5$ir cle ^ 

Circle K merr 
m n Monday 
357 -5i;* f the Stude 
HI vote on vk 

Question about billing F ° r m ° 

Sales Manager 357-S 57-6940. 

Business Manager 357-5; jgycholog; 

The Psycholc 
, em bership to z 



To place an ad 

Local ads 
National ads 



To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 
Editor 

Editorial/Opinion 
Lifestyles 
News 
Sports 



357 5* least three hoi 

357-3 'ho 'S curren 
357-asychologycour 

357-5 nillbeheld onT 

357-5 i a.m- > n roor 

357-5 la |l. 

jlack Stu< 

The Current Sauce is locateiASSOCiatlO 
the Office of Student Publication The Black ! 
225 Kyser Hall ^ have a n 

The Current Sauce is publul [bursday. Sept. 
every week during the fall by he Student Un 
students of North western State I a )e in the BS 
versity of Louisiana. Itisnotasi -ofesentative ! 
ated with any of the university'i . 
partments and is financed indeJJ* , 

dently. Baptist St 

The Baptisl 

The deadline for all advert , . „ 
ments is 5 p.m. the Thursday ^western v 
fore publication. tfissionsGolf S 

Sept. 14 begi 

Inclusion of any and all mi forth we Stern Y 
rial is left to the discretion of I r r, 
editor. entry fee is 

with four-mem 

The Current Sauce will not fhe entry fee ] 
printed on November 26, 1991 dm cours e but doe< 
the university's Thanksgiving H for gQ]f ^ 

toward surmie 
The Current Sauce is entered information. C< 
second-class mail at Natchitoch d:]| Collins at 
LA. 



Postmaster: send address cl 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU 
Natchitoches, LA 71497 

© Current Sauce 



Comp 

hangesi|needs Cam pi 
Great pay. 5 
Call Gordon 



ITZA PIZZA 



Open Mon-Fri llam-llpm 
Buffet Mon-Fri llam-2 pm 
Sat&Sun 6 pm-llpm 



Pool Tournament 



September 11 7:00pm 



Sponsored By ARA & 



Natchitoches 



Budweiser 



Monday Night 
Football 
Specials- 

Every Monday 
Night 




Full Meal Deal Daily 



$3.49 - Includes: 
Entree 

Starch 
Vegetable 

Cooked-to-order 
Breakfast 
and 

Full Breakfast Bar Daily 
from 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM. 



Coming Soon... 



Breakfast Takitoes 
& 

Student Suggestion Box 




September 10th 
11:00 - 1:30 pm. 

£Fruit {fantasia " 

A fabulous array of fresh fruits! 



September 12th 
4:30 - 6:30 pm. 

Seafood Buffet 

All your favorite seafood dishes! 



September 17th 
11:00 - 1:30 pm. 

Make your own BMM SPLIT i 



Iberville Dining Hall offers 
all-you-can-eat for one low 
price. Remember, you can 
use your Variable Meal 
Card! 



turrets 



^i?J W temberlO,1991 



NEWS 



Page 3 



5 auc jCampus Connections 



aS eball team 

yy a |k-on tryouts 



for 



. Box 6830 
■n State Univerait 

Louisiana 714, ^western's baseball team will be 
s 140 - 680) ijd at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, Sept 
„ the baseball field. Everyone 
Lthave a doctor's release to tryout 
ach the Sauo p r more information, call 357 

e Sauc,' 39 ' , 

357l}!irc le K 

Circle K members will meet at 6 
u, on Monday, Sept. 16 in room 



ad 



ie news 



ection 



on 



357-5, f the Student Union. Members 
357 "S .j| v ote on vice president at the 
>ut billing leeting For more information, call 
r 357-5 57-6940. 

ager 357-5; > s ychology Club 

fhe Psychology Club is open for 
,ernbership to anyone who has had 

357-s iteast lhree hours of P s y cholo ^y or 

357-51 »ho is currently enrolled in a 
357-51 isychology course. The first meeting 
357-5, ,111 be held on Thursday, Sept. 12 at 
357-S I a.m. in room 306 of Bienvenu 
357-5 j^. 

Hack Student 

it Sauce is locate Association 

dent Publication The Black Student Association 
'• v jH have a meeting at 11 a.m 

« Sauce is public rhursday, Sept. 12, in room 316 of 
•ing the fall by he Student Union. T-shirts are on 
hwestem State! a ie in the BSA office and class 
ana. Itisnotasa iprese ntative applications will be 
'the university's . .m 
sfinancedindep* nUnt,Unda - V - a . 

Baptist Student Union 

The Baptist Student Union at 
"theTWroday Northwestern will hold its Summer 
MissionsGolf Scramble on Saturday, 
Sept. 14 beginning at 8 a.m. at 
f any and all nu Northwestern Hills Golf Course. The 
1 * i 

entry fee is $12 per team member 
with four-member teams competing. 
t Sauce will not fhe entry fee includes lunch at the 
nber 26, 1991 dui course D , lt joes not cover the charge 
for golf carts. All proceeds will go 
toward summer missions. For more 
(Sauce is entered information contact David Rose or 
il at Natchitoch Bi || Collins at 352-5464. 



SAM 

The members of Society for 
Advancement of Management will 
be raffling off two New Orleans Saints 
vs. San Francisco 49ers game tickets 
beginning Wednesday, Sept. 11. 

The game is scheduled for Nov. 
1 and the drawing for the tickets will 
beheld Oct. 31. 

SAM will be holding their second 
meeting at 3:30 p.m. Sept. 1 1 in room 
102 of Morrison Hall. All interested 
persons are encouraged to attend. 
SAM will also be taking nominations 
at the meeting for officer positions 
that are still available. Raffle tickets 
will also be given out at the meeting; 
so all members need to attend. 



Anthropology Club 

There will be a meeting for the 
Anthropology Club at noon 
Wednesday, Sept. 1 1 in the 
Archaeology Lab. 
STUN 

The Student Theater Union of 
Northwestern will hold their first 
meeting of the semester at 5 p.m. 
today in the theater student lounge 
All persons interested in theater are 
welcome to attend. For more 
information call David at 357-4244. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority Inc. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. 
will be holding its fall 1991 rush 
party in the President's Room of the 



Student Union at 6:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Sept. 18. All girls that 
are interested in becoming a member 
are encouraged to attend. Attire will 
be semi -formal. 
Zeta Phi Beta 
Sorority Inc. 

The Xi Epsilon Chapter of Zeta 
Phi Beta Sorority Inc. would like to 
welcome three members, Scherry 
Jefferies.Quenta Marie Johnson, and 
Peggy Lewis, who were inducted into 
the organization during the summer 
semester. 

The newly-elected officers for the 
fall 1991 semester are Henrietta 
Collins, president; Charlotte Kellum, 



vice president; Yalaunda Taylor, 
secretary; Quenta Johnson, treasurer; 
Peggy Lewis, parliamentarian, and 
Scherry Jefferies, historian. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. will 
sponsor a "Showtime at the Blue 
Room Zeta Style," a show very similar 
to "Showtime at the Apollo." There 
will be adance immediately following 
the show. For all persons interested 
participants contact Yalaunda Taylor 
at 357- 1 094. There will be a $5 entry 
fee and a grand prize will be given 
away. Entrance fee into the show will 
be $3 at the door. The show will be at 
Ruby's Blue Room located in the 
Self-Help Shopping Center on Martin 
Luther King Jr. Drive at 8 p.m. on 



Wednesday, Sept. 18. 

Student Nurses' 
Association 

The Student Nurses' Association 
on the Natchitoches campus will meet 
on Thursday, Sept. 26 in room 123 of 
Fournet Hall . Officers will be elected, 
special projects will be discussed and 
a short presentation concerning a 
nursing specialty will be given. 

There will be a Halloween Weiner 
Roast on Oct. 31 at the Recreation 
Complex from 5 to 9 p.m. If 
transportation is needed, meet at the 
Home Economics Building at 4:45 
p.m. Each SNA member may bring 
an adult guest. 



ie discretion of l 



Thanksgiving Hi 



d address 
'.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
OS, LA 71497. 

ent Sauce 



CompuSearch 

4'eeds Campus Rep. No selling. 
Great pay. 5 hours per week. 
Call Gordon 1-600-937-1797 



th ] 
m. 

ia 

fruits! 

th 

n. ] 

ffel 

dishes! 

th 
m. 

SPLIT 




TUES. 

Alternative night 
*No Cover 
WED. 

2 farlRjr Drinks til 1200 
Beer Bust 9-2 

THURS. 

SCacfies Stfigfit 
Ladies Drink Free 

-Sex on the Beach 
-Amaretto Sour 
-Draft 

Beer Bust 9-2 
FRI. 

No Cover till 11:00 
Ladies Drink Free till 11:00 
.25 Draft till 11:00 



Flag Football Officials' Clinic 

The Leisure Activities Department 
s Now Hiring and Training 
Flag Football Officials ✓ 



No Experience Necessary 
$4.25 Per Game 




Flag Football Officials' Clinic 
Tuesday, September 10th 7:00pm 
Room 114, Intramural/Recreation Building 

For Additional Information Call The Leisure Activities Office 
at 357-5461 or 357-5462 




Peddler 's 




Dffers 
e low 
j can 
Meal 



PEDDLER'S COUPON 



Late Night Snack 



$8 



95 

plus 
tax 



TWO PEDDLER'S PIZZAS 
with cheese and one topping 

Offer Good through Sept. 30 

Valid only with COUPON. Not 
valid with any other offer. One 
Coupon per customer. 



It 



352 - 1555 
247 Keyser 

Tell your friends how good it is" 



*Z^iiversity 
bookstore 



"Shirt of the Week" 



Champion Sweatshirt 
Teal and Purple 
Available 

Reg $29.99 Sale $19.99 

Offer Good Thru Sept. 13 



GO 



Page 4 



NEWS 



September 10, 1< 



IFC Formal Rush successful as 61 pledge fraternities 



By MICHELLE GENRE 

Staff Writer 

Thanks to NSU's Interfraternity 
Council, most of Northwestern' s 
fraternities are in agreement that this 
fall's formal rush was a definite 
success with 61 of the 76 rushees 
pledging. 

According to Morgan Collins, vice- 
president of IFC, this success was 
due to the letters sent to each of the 
incoming freshmen, as well as phone 
calls and information passed around 
at Freshman Connection. These 
devices improved the number of 
rushees from last year's 43 to this 
year's 76, said Collins. 

With open rush underway, Kappa 
Alpha has gained 27 pledges. 

"Thanks to the work of Morgan 
Collins and the IFC, we got the turnout 
we really needed," said Stan Broome, 
president of Kappa Alph% at NSU. 

However, Broome said that he 
thinks that there is a need for formal 
rush during school. "This would 
really add to the number of rushees," 
Broome said. 

Ray Gill, president of Kappa 
Sigma, said that the fraternity has 
goals to improve grade point 
averages, build in the future and 
become involved with other campus 
organizations. According to Gill, 
Kappa Sigma has hopes of improving 
the whole Greek organization, not 
just their fraternity this year. 

"I thought we had a very successful 
rush. This is one of the better pledge 
classes that has come through Kappa 
Sigma," said Gill. 

With its new rush program called 
New Membership Developing 
Program, Tau Kappa Epilson has 
received its largest pledge class in 
three years. This program consists of 
a two week pledge period, and Tau 
Kappa Epilson is the only fraternity 
nationwide to use this system. 

"We are in a building process right 
now," James Lang, treasurer of Tau 
Kappa Epilson, said. "We are a 
fraternity on the rise because of 



quality leadership, and we are 
extremely satisfied with our new rush 
program." 

Though disappointed with the 
number of Theta Chi pledges, Charles 
Cox, president, feels that the fraternity 
will make it up in open rush. 

"Overall, formal rush went well," 
Carl Landry, Theta Chi chairman of 
rush activities, said. "I think the 
activities were good, but I wish we 
had more time." 

Jeffrey Stanfield, Theta Chi pledge, 
said, "It was a different experience, 
that' s for sure. I went with Theta Chi 
because they made me feel most 
welcome." 

Though some are confused about 
the situation of Sigma Tau Gamma 
Fraternity, President Jon Terry said 
that the chapter still exists at 
Northwestern and is presently 
participating in open rush. After 
temporarily losing two of its three 
members to Desert Storm, Sigma Tau 
Gammahas now retained its members 
and has a hopeful list of pledges. 

Alpha Phi Alpha and Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternities did not participate 
in formal rush because of their 
deferred rush system. This system 
includes informational seminars to 
which interested students attend to 
learn about the history, purposes and 
goals of each fraternity. 

The Fall 1991 Kappa Alpha 
pledges are Brad Arnold, Will 



Aucoin, Bret Broasway, Cameron 
Classi, Craig Creedy , Scotty Dowden, 
Ryan Duboval, Peter Dugas, Bill 
Futrell, Bobby George, Nathan 
Hanks, Chad Hidalgo, Jasson 
Johnson, Scott Johnston, Raymond 

Krull, Jeff Lang, Robert McDonald, 
John McLead, Al Plummer, Kenn 
Posey, Sonny Shipp, Brad Sievers, 
Jay St. Roman, Paul Theady , Micheal 
Tonglet, Bryan Townsend and Chris 
Townsend. 

The Kappa Sigma pledges are 
Bobby Adams, Gene Brisset, Alex 
Browne, Michael Crenshaw, Kurt 
Danzy, Jason Davis, Carroll DeMas, 
Randy Dovers, Jeff Durham, Bruce 
Fisher, Donald Gardener, Roy Gentry, 
Gilbert Guerrero, Trey Keyser, 
Matthew Koury, Thomas Laysone, 
Craig Melder, Leon Minvielle, Dale 
Montgomery, Blaine Murphy, Matt 
Phillips, Tommy Rhodes, Shawn 
Stehr, Joey Stiefada and William 
Vienne. 

The Tau Kappa Epilson pledges 
are Doug Barron, Joey Basco, John 
Capone, Jason Dalton, BobEmfinger, 
Riley Lambert, David Matherne, Chris 
Morel , Jason Morgan, Justin Morrow, 
Kevin Pagano, Toby Punchard, Jason 
Reitmeyer, Ray Stewart, Richard 
Vaughn, Brian Vaughan, Jason Ward, 
Ronald Wiggins and Ron Young. 

The Fall 1991 Theta Chi pledge is 
Jeffrey Stanfield. 






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Hours of Operation 

Monday - Thursday 1 2 noon-8 :00pm 
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Page 6 



NEWS 



September 10, l9|ep 



[ 




BSA to reach to community 

Black Student Association aims to involve 
members more on campus, in Natchitoches 



By MARIA JONES 

Staff Writer 

The Black Student Association is 
starting the 1991-1992 school year 
with a new office in Kyser Hall and 
goals to enrich college life for black 
students at NSU with information 
and encouragement. 

Activities planned for the year 
include guest lecturers, forums, 
parties, a homecoming reception and 
T-shirt sales. 

Community activities are also 
planned that are designed to reach 
out to the black community in 
Natchitoches, said BSA President 
Leonard Williams. He said that he 
feels that a bond between the students 
and the community is important. 

"I don't feel myself as a transient 
or somebody who just comes to NSU 
for four years," Williams said. "I feel 
I am a resident of Natchitoches. I 
may not vote here, I may not pay a lot 
of taxes but I still feel that it would be 
wrong of me to come in here and not 
give anything back to the community 
that has given so much." 

Another function of the BSA is to 
inform black students about 
scholarships, internships and many 
other areas of interest to students. 
Although NSU makes the 
information available, students are 
not always aware they exist or who to 
go to for the information. 

Williams wants the BSA to be the 
first organization black students join 
and hopes it will be a factor in helping 
them to get the information they need 
to find their place in other campus 
organizations or clubs that fit into 
their special interests so they will be 
involved in the entire university. 

"There aren't many black students 
in campus organizations as it is," 



Williams said. "I have been the only 
person on the Current Sauce staff for 
the past year and a half." 

According to Williams, black 
students make up about 1 percent of 
the total student population which 
amounts to 700 or more and the largest 
minority group on campus. 

"Black representation is very poor 
at this time. SAB has the largest 
number with four," Williams said. 
"SGA at the present time has nobody 
— as far as a voting member. The 
upcoming class elections were one 
of the topics discussed at the last 
BSA meeting, and members were 
encouraged to get involved and vote." 

Williams said that he believes that 
black students "who do not feel they 
are a part of anything because of the 
way many campus organizations are 
set up will be more likely to get 



involved on other organizations if 
they become involved in the BSA 
first." 

Not new to NSU, the BSA started 
in 1987 as the Black Caucus 
Association, adopted a new name in 
1988 and w as officially chartered in 
April 1991. 

Membership in the BSA is simple, 
said member Jerry Roberson. 

"If you are a registered student, 
basically you're a member," 
Roberson said. "We do have a 
membership card and you have to 
pay for the cost of the card which is 
$ 1 , and we do like members to attend 
the meetings." 

The first general meeting held last 
Wednesday had almost 100 in 
attendance, some of whom were not 
black. Roberson expects the next 
meeting to double. 



IM facilities meet students' needs 



Providing programming, facilities, 
equipment and personnel to meet the 
recreational needs of students, faculty 
and staff at Northwestern are the 
primary goals of the Leisure Activities 
Department. Leisure Activities at 
NSU operates under the auspices of 
the Division of Student Life and is 
housed in the Intramural/Recreation 
building. 

"Participation in the Leisure 
Activities program at NSU creates 
opportunities for students to pursue 
healthy lifestyles, enjoy social 
interaction in a chosen leisure pursuit 
and to participate in a variety of 
diversified activities that meet 
individual needs and desires," said 



Dr. Gene Newman, directorof Leisure 
Activities. 

Facility utilization has become a 
major part of the program as 
thousands of students signed in to use 
the IM building last year. The facility 
is open 72 hours each week with 
activity taking place on the basketball 
courts and the game room, which 
houses pool tables, air hockey and 
ping pong tables. The weight room 
includes a cardio fitness center with 
four Schwinn Ai r dyne bicycles, two 
Rowing Ergs, Body Mater Equipment 
and over 1 ,000 pounds of free weights. 
Four instructional vacquetball courts 
and the Blue Room, which has card 
and table games, a stereo and a 



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Wednesday, September 18th, 12 noon • 




Swim Meet 
Wednesday, September 18th, 3:00pm 
Recreation Complex 

For Additional Information 
Call the Leisure Activities Office at 357-5461 



television complete with VCR,ro 
out the IM building. 

An equipment check-out rooj j 
also available to student, faculty ' 
staff. With a valid ID card, equip 
fishing poles to horseshoes to be 
games to a variety of atn '' »f*/"l C 
equipment can be checked out. JJ. 

The IM building is open fnj 
a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday thro 
Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday Craig Po 
from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sun To a" studen 

ffice say: 

The Intramural Program, one asr f, * ,WeSte ^ re 
of the Leisure Activities DepartnkP • 
offers a structured, competitive b^Pl* 11111 ^ | 
program for all students, faculty]C urren ., ' „ 

staff * H?S 

Lived after A 

i the compute 

epersareinou 

onsidered con 

Hudent Aid R 

lata Form, 

pademic trar 

ludents, loan 

, x and verif 

■quired. At thi 

tilled for pad 

our grants, lo 

■ e processed. 

As of this 

umerouspape 

ornputer and 

ntered, the aid 

Ye are asking 

e patient with 

ie number o 

apers may 

omputer. 'W 

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Hm in their par. 

verwhelming 

Student Em] 

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More Info. Call 357-5461 






IMPORTANT MESSAGE 
FOR STUDENTS 

FROM THE 

NATCHITOCHES 
HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB 



YOU may join from sept thru December for only 

$100.00. 
(That includes tax & entry fee.) 
All you have to do is pay up front. With this great 
special, you may use racquetball, basketball, aerobics, 
weights, stairclimbers and we have men's and 
women's dressing rooms and protein bar. 

IF you want to pay by the month: 

$25.00 entry fee $22.50 a month (semester contract) 



WE ARE IN WALKING DISTANCE FROM ANYWHERE 

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NEWS 



Page 7 



Financial Aid Update 



Magri joins LSC science team 



3 



competitive 
idents, faculty 



tudentjobs 
program explained 



:heck-out n 
udent, faculty 
Dcard.equipii 
)rseshoes to bj 
iety of athl 
checked out. 
ig is open froi 
Monday thro 

3 4 p rn Friday Craig Pollman, Financial Aid 

turdayandSun To a" students ' ** Financial Aid 
ffice savs welcome to 

. hrthwestern. Each week, I will 

Yogram.oneas 3(W * n J t 

••• ™ *n vou abreast of all the latest 
vitiesDepartm *P y ■ «■ 

•k. opening in our office. 

Currently, the office is busy 

tering all financial aid papers 

Lived after Aug. 1 and registration 

■*Jithe computer. Once all necessary 

Ljers are in our office, your folder is 

pnsidered complete. This includes 

jtudent Aid Report, Financial Aid 

)ata Form, financial aid and 

cademic transcripts for transfer 

tudents, loan applications, income 

( x and verification form when 

■quired. At this point, your folder is 

tilled for packaging. This is when 

our grants, loans and scholarships 

ffe processed. 

As of this writing, there are 
umerous papers to be entered on the 
omputer and until these papers are 
ntered, the aid will not be processed. 
1c are asking all students to please 
e patient with our office and to limit 
ie number of visits so that your 
apers may be entered on the 
omputer. We are working days, 
ignis and weekends to solve this 
ituation. There are so many students 
rtio wait to the very last minute to 
jm in theirpaperwork that it is simply 
verwhelming. 

Student Employment positions are 
nother major concern among 
Itudents who visit our office. At the 
resent tome, there are not any 
ositions available. 
There is a major misunderstanding 
mong students as to how this 
rogram works. There are only 250 
lositions available for all 
iorthwestern campuses. 



Student Employment positions are 
awarded on a first come, first serve 
basis. This is determined by our 
timely receipt of all paperwork. Many 
students have their paperwork for the 
next academic year in our office by 
March. These students are considered 
first if they are eligible. It does not 
matter if you have been in a position 
for three years, if your paperwork is 
not complete early, you will not 
receive a position. 

All students who were receiving a 
student employment scholarship and 
your name failed to appear on the 
assignment list, this error is being 
corrected and those who met the 
requirements for the scholarship will 
be assigned a position. 

If there are any questions regarding 
student employment, you need to see 
our new counselor, Mrs. Shirley 
Scott, on the second floor of the 
Student Union. 

Perhaps the most popular question 
of all in our office is, "When will ray 
loan check be in?" The answer is, 
"As soon as v;e are able to process 
your folder." 

Once processed, checks can take 
anywhere from three days to three 
weeks to be received in our office. 

Let me assure every studeni on 
campus that we welcome any and all 
students in our office. If you have 
any questions regarding your 
financial aid, by all means, come by. 
If you come in and things look hectic, 
they are. Until we are able to have 
larger facilities, this situation will 
remain. We ask that you be very 
patient and understanding as we are 
working very hard to process each 
student as quickly and efficiently as 
possible. 



■ Continued from page 1 

Magri said that Northwestern had 
a good physics curriculum until 
budget cutbacks by both the university 
and the government caused many of 
the professors to leave during the 
1980s." 

"I would like to see good things 
happen in physics — not only at 
Scholars' College, but on the whole 
campus," he said. 

A native of New York, Magri 



received his bachelor's degree from 
Thomas Jefferson University in 
Virginia. He earned his master's and 
doctorate degrees from Cornell 
University in New York, where he 
met his wife, a native of France. 

Magri, who is qualified to teach 
both physics and astronomy, did his 
doctoral research in Puerto Rico using 
the world's biggest radio telescope. 
He then spent two years teaching at 
West Georgia College. Last year, he 



taught under a visiting professorship 
at Susquehanna College, a private 
college in central Pennsylvania. 

Although he said that he has spent 
much of his time so far filling out 
retirement, health insurance and other 
papers, Magri said he is looking 
forward to working with the students 
and establishing a more rounded 
curriculum for all of the Scholars' 
College students. 



Workshops set 

Three 30-minute workshops will 
be offered by the reference staff of 
Watson Library during September. 

Topics include "Introduction to 
Library Services," at 2p.m. on Mon- 
day, Sept. 16 and 1 1 a.m. on Tues- 
day, Sept. 17, "Computer Re- 
sources for Research," at 2 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Sept. 18 and at 1 1 a.m. 
on Thursday, Sept. 19 and "Term 
Paper Tactics," at 2 p.m. on Mon- 
day, Sept. 23 and at 1 1 a.m. on 
Tuesday, Sept. 24. 





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Page 8 



September 10, 199} 



SUPER SPORTS 



geptembe 



ros 



Demons open with 28-3 ambush of Arkansas Stat^P ei 

JJL J0 N TERRY 

. . <- »t i . •„ u: ™ . rJi'lnr 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Staff Writer 

Common knowledge informs us 
that the Arkansas State Indians are 
packing the moving van for a 1992 
move up to Division I-A. But on last 
Saturday night, the Northwestern 
Demons looked like the ones 
preparing to drive the U-Haul. 

In an unexpected show of 
absolutism, the Demon defense 
suppressed ASU's "triple-shoot" 
offense and its trigger man, 
quarterback Roy Johnson, while 
Northwestern' s offense moved the 
ball effectively under the authority of 
quarterback Brad Brown. The Demon 
mastery resulted in a season-opening 
28-3 victory over ASU in front of 
20,000fans in ASU's Indian Stadium. 

With the win, the Demons extended 
their winning streak to four games 



dating back to last season and avenged 
a 16-8 loss to ASU last year, fhe 
Demon defense slapped a vise on 
ASU's offense, holding the Indians 
to 192 net yards, forcing four 
turnovers and keeping the Indians 
out of the end zone. That studly 
showing drew praise from 
Northwestern head coach Sam 
Goodwin. 

"We were hitting so hard and 
breaking on the ball so well 
defensively," said Goodwin. "I 
thought they dropped some, and after 
a while, they were a little vulnerable 
and started hearing footsteps. Our 
kids really hit hard." 

Goodwin couldn't stop his gushing 
there. And with Northwestern 
registering three sacks and holding 
Johnson to 67 yards passing on 10 of 



25 accuracy, there was plenty reason 
to gush. 

"At this point in time, I think it's 
the best defense we've had," said 
Goodwin. "Going through preseason 
practice, they've done the best job on 
our offense of any group we've had. 

"Going into the game, we were 
hoping that was our defense playing 
well and not our offense looking bad. 
Based on Saturday night, I'd say that 
was the case." 

The game marked the debut of the 
Demons' new one-back offense, 
which creates a slot back, a wing 
back and a lone tailback. If Saturday 
night' s performance is a harbinger of 
things to come, the offense will help 
the Demons put points on the board 
this season as well as control the ball 
and the clock. 

Brown, the top returning Division 



I-AA rushing quarterback with 843 
yards last year, catalyzed the Demon 
offense, rushing 2 1 times for 95 yards 
and completing 8 of 1 3 passes for 90 
yards and two touchdowns. ASU 
coach Al Kincaid recognized Brown' s 
double-threat danger. 

"Their quarterback made us look 
bad," said Kincaid. "He'll make a lot 
of other teams look bad. He's a good 
one." 

Northwestern' s offense controlled 
the ball for almost 36 of the game's 
60 minutes. The Demons rushed for 
237 yards on 51 carries while 
averaging five yards per play. 

ASU took the game's opening 
kickoff and marched 51 yards in 10 
plays to the Demon 19 before Ryan 
Jose kicked a 36-yard field goal to 
give the Indians a 3-0 lead. But it was 



Nevada to be tough foe 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

For head coach Sam Goodwin and 
; his Northwestern football team, 
I Saturday night was a time for 
exultation. This week, though, is a 
time for preparation. 

The Demons enjoyed a 
| confidence-inflating 28-3 victory over 
Division I-A-bound Arkansas State 
Saturday night, boosting 
Northwestern into The Sports 
Network's Division I-AA Top 
Twenty poll this week at No. 13 and 
creating excitement in Northwestern 
football circles. But perhaps the 
season ' s sternest test comes Saturday 
when the Demons meet the Nevada 
VVi >lf pack in Reno at 1 :05 p.m. Pacific 
time on Saturday. 

Nevada, fresh off a 50-8 scourging 
of Nevada- Las Vegas, is the defending 
^— Rig-Sky Conference champ and last 
[ year's Division I-AA runner-up. 
Nevada is currently ranked No. 2 in 
the NCAA poll and sixth in The Sports 
Network poll. 

Nevada, which has expanded 
Mackay Stadium in anticipation of a 
move up to Division I-A and the Big 
West Conference next year, defeated 
the Demons 35-26 in the team's only 
prior meeting, which was in 1988. 
But if the Demons suffer defeat 
Saturday, they can draw comfort from 
what followed the 1988 loss. That 



year, the Demons reeled off seven 
straight wins following the Nevada 
debacle en route to a Southland 
Conference title. Whatever the result, 
Goodwin and his team aren't 
disillusioned. 

"We've got to improve this week 
to have a chance," said Goodwin. 
The sort of defense we played against 
Arkansas State would allow us to be 
in the game this weekend, but there 
are lots of areas we have to improve to 
be competitive against Nevada." 

The Demons aren't expecting the 
weather to be a concern, but Goodwin 
is already worried about one other 
element besides the Wolfpack - the 
Wolfpack's playing surface. 

"They're probably the toughest 
win on our schedule," said Goodwin. 
"They're every bit as good as I thought 
they might be. 

"I hope their playing field is better 
than it was in '88. I'd like to bring our 
turf, because theirs hampers our 
offense. But they're a good enough 
team that they could play in the desert 
and win." 

Quarterback Fred Gatlin 
administers the Wolfpack's high- 
octane offense, which rolled up 543 
total yards against UNLV. Gatlin 
victimized the Rebels for 293 yards 
passing on 18 of 31 marksmanship. 
Wide receiver Joe King is a favorite 
target of Gatlin ' s, having caught three 



passes for 75 yards and three 
touchdowns last week. 

The driving forces behind Nevada 
head coach Chris Ault's defense are 
All-American linebacker Matt 
Clafton and cornerback Brock 
Marion. Clafton rang up nine tackles 
in helping the Wolfpack restrict 
UNLV to an anemic 1 1 8 yards and 
six first downs. 

Another potential source of trouble 
for the Demons will be the large crowd 
expected in Nevada's Mackay 
Stadium. Over 24, 123 fans filed into 
Mackay Stadium last week, and the 
stadium's capacity is expected to be 
expanded to 26,000 for 
Northwestern's Saturday visit. 

"If we win this one, there's no 
question we have a chance to have a 
great football team," said Goodwin 
"There's not many teams that go into 
Mackay Stadium and win." 

As of Monday, the Wolfpack were 
reporting no injuries. The Demons' 
wounded included tackle Tim Alaniz 
(kidney infection), guard Bax Kegans 
(knee) and defensive end Scott 
Murphy (knee surgery) , who are out, 
and nose tackle Rodney King 
(strained knee), wing back John 
Tappin (bruised shoulder) and 
tailback Deon Ridgell (bruised 
Achilles tendon), who are probable 
for the game. 



Volleyball drops opener 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

""Northwestern's Lady Demon 
vojjeyball team opened their 1991 
season Saturday with a 3-15, 7-15 
and 11-15 loss at the University of 
Arkansas at Little Rock. 

NSU was led offensively by junior 
Claire Gilmartin with 12 kills, 
freshman Shera Dowell with eight, 
and senior Kelly Banks with six more. 
Senior Sandi Sherrill also added three 
service aces to the offensive tally. 



On the defensive side, Gilmartin 
and senior Janice Graham led with a 
combined total of four blocks. 

"We played fairly well," said Lady 
Demon coach Rickey McCalister. 
"But our inexperience showed. We 
had so many rookie mistakes that 
will hopefully be cured with time." 

Of 14 girls on the squad, 1 1 saw 
time on the court, including six of the 
seven new freshman players. At one 
point, McCalister had five freshmen 
on the court. Most notable of these 



freshman players were Dowell, Karen 
Hill and Jennifer Jannak. 

One player who did not see any 
time on the court was junior Monica 
Matthieu, who was forced to sit out 
with a sprained ankle. She should be 
ready for action this week. 

When the Lady Demons return to 
action, they will do so at home. 
Louisiana Tech will visit Prather 
Coliseum this afternoon for a 7 p.m. 
match, and Arkansas-Little Rock will 
be down for a rematch Thursday at 4 
p.m. 



ADY 



MONS 



downhill from there for the Indian's 
triple-shoot offense. 

Northwestern responded 
immediately with ar. 1 1 -play, 64-yard 
drive capped by a three-yard 
touchdown run by Deon Ridgell with 
5:48 left in the first quarter. Freshman 
kicker Jason Fernandez added the 
point after to put the Demons up 7-3, 
which is how it would stay until a few 
minutes into the third quarter. 

Early in the third quarter, the 
Wildcats forced the Demons to punt, 
but ASU's Blake Denison fumbled 
and Demon linebacker Scooter 
DiVittorio recovered at the ASU 1 1 . 
Three plays later, Brown hit James 
McKellum on a seven-yard scoring 
pass, and a Fernandez extra point 
gave the Demons a 14-3 lead with 
10:13 left in the third quarter. 
The teams traded possessions twice 




jON TERRY 

before Northwestern's big-st, '^s Editor 
capability singed the Indians. Northwestern 's 
first and 10 from the ASU 35. B n $ open their 199 
hit Guy Hedrick over the middle , the most con veil 
a 35-yard touchdown pass. ^ race will be a 
Fernandez point after furnished Beginning at 5 
Demons with a 21-3 advantage ,jl|run atwo-mili 
2:34 left in the third quarter. ( sU campus, and 
Northwestern drove a final s ur- m '' e cours 
into ASU's heart with two sect joftheastandLou 
left in the game on a two-yard sco gst to provide to 
sweep around the left side by The women's t 
freshman Danny Alexander. t led by junior te 

) U bay and fres 
"Defensively, it was super," | Wallace, of Hum 
Goodwin. "Offensively, it ,jg names for the 
probably our best performance j ^returning sophc 
opening game. We had guys c md Marie Gipe, a 
anddidn'tgettheballtothem. W( )avison. 
got lots of little things we've d Despite all eff< 
better, but it was a good ovi tfaggio- this will 
performance." rebuilding year ft 

squad. Having lo 
mj season and \ 
ie am in years, Q 
ing to build a 
ptimistic. 

We have s< 
mners in Dianni 
^aggiosaid."W< 
team, but I think tl 
f the runners is 
Last year's La 
best year ever, ai 
the conference, 
this team could c 
We did v« 
conference meets 
get to us at the SI 
well as we could 
want to be able to 
Walls this seas< 
On the oppos 
men are lool 
uad for this 
reaching 20 in ni 
group will be 
sophomore Bill) 
runners could 
Rosado, Rene 

Demon football players take a break at a practice last week. Saturday the Demons beat Arkansas State 28-3 in their seaS 
opener. This week the team travels to Reno to face the Division I-AA No. 2 ranked team, the University of Nevada 




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The1991 Lady Demon volleyball team: Front row (l-r) Shera Dowell, Jeri Lyn Dusenbery, Sandi Sherrill, Carrie Shirley. Back row 
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10, 199} 



September 10, 1991 



SPORTS 



Page 9 



;}ross country to 



at^P en a * nome 



n s 



jON TERRY 

b 'g-St] Lis Editor 
• Indians. j^ rthwestem'scrosscountryteam 
^SU 35, Brr^jH open their 1991 season Thursday 
the middle, the most convenient way possible, 
wn pass, jje race will be at home, 
r furnished Beginning at 5 p.m., the women 
idvantage i run a two-mile course across the 
quarter. jjU campus, and the men will run a 
e a final s o0 r-mi'e course. Squads from 
h two secf»j ftheast and Louisiana Tech will be 
'o-yard sco & to provide tough competition, 
ft side by ~ The women's team this year will 
nander l. led by junior team captain Dianne 
)ubay and freshman Maryalyce 
as super.'' Wallace, of Humble, Texas. Other 
ively . it *,jg names for the Lady Demons will 
formance j * returning sophomores Judy Norris 
lad guys o md Marie Gipe, and freshman Carla 
othem W| )avison. 

»s we" ve d Despite all efforts by coach Chris 
good ov( dagg'°- m ' s ^ somewhat of a 
ebuilding year for the Lady Demon 
squad. Having lost two star runners 
jus season and having the smallest 
Ijam in years, Coach Maggio is left 
jying to build a squad. But, he is 
ptimistic. 

We have some experienced 
nners in Dianne, Marie and Judy," 
aggio said. "We also have a smaller 
team, but I think the individual quality 
of the runners is better this year." 

Last year' s Lady Demons ran their 
best year ever, and finished sixth in 
the conference, but Maggio thinks 
this team could do better. 
. Jjjggjl "We did very well in pre- 
jJi^r conference meets but we let our nerves 
get to us at the SLC and did not do as 
well as we could have," he said. "We 
want to be able to avoid those types of 
(pitfalls this season." 
On the opposite side of the coin, 
e men are looking at an immense 
squad for this season, possibly 
leaching 20 in number. Leading this 
group will be Brad Sievers and 
sophomore Billy Gaines. Other top 
runners could include Damien* 
Rosado, Rene Coronado, Albert 



Hernandez, Tim Rosas, Kerry Gray 
and freshman Eric Metoyer, last 
year's AAA state champion. 

Both squads are anxious and 
waiting for Thursday's meet. After 
two and a half weeks of training, 
most are very ready to run against 
someone else. 

"We're always proud to run on 
our home course and we want to give 
the people at Northwestern something 
they can be proud of," Maggio said. 
"But most of all, we're ready to run !" 





Lady Demon cross country team captain 
Dianne Dubay 



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By PAUL PICKERING 

Staff Writer 

The U. S. Open wasn't the only 
place to find good tennis this weekend. 
The courts of the NSU Tennis 
Complex were filled with exciting 
matches as the second annual Foy 
Motors/Lady Demon Classic tennis 
tournament got underway. 

There were 104 people entered in 
14 separate divisions, and 141 total 
matches were played. According to 
tournament director Bob Morrow, the 
event exceeded expectations. "We 
managed to raise $ 1 ,900 for the Lady 
Demon tennis team," he said. 



There were several great matches, 
but the finals of the men'sopen singles 
was a real barn-burner. It featured 
1 7-year-old Davor I vancic, a foreign 
exchange student from Belgrade, 
Yugoslavia, and Greg Schuliger. who 
played four years for the U.S. Military 
Academy. 

Both players had powerful serves 
and the match seemed to hinge on 
who could break the other first. They 
split the first two sets, and neither 
player could gain an advantage in the 
third and final set, which went to a 
tie-breaker. 

At six points apiece, Ivancic hit a 



ball close to the line which appeared 
to be out, but Schuliger called it good. 
Ivancic then closed out the match 
with an unreturnable serve for a hard 
fought 4-6, 6-3, 7-6(8-6) win. This 
gave Ivancic a sweep of the men's 
open events as he and Kenny 
Anderson took the doubles title with 
a 7-6, 6-1 victory over 

Schuliger and Ken Hughes. 

Ivancic, who is used to the cooler 
Yugoslavian climate, said, "The heat 



almost killed me!" However, he did 
say that he would like to play college 
tennis here if he could find a 

scholarship offer. 

Other notable winners in the 
tournament included Barbe Ducharat 
in women's open singles, Jane 
Patterson and Kasey Nunley in 
women's open doubles, and Jack 
Brittain Jr. and Elvira Spika in the 
open mixed doubles. 



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September 10, 19g 



ltern ber 10, 



jON TERRY 

ris Editor 

^western State 
et ba11 team will fo 
coaches as I 
an sas*s Gail 5 
j,westem'sownl 
^ffthis season. 

jiegler, who hel 
gazorbacks to i 

jng. a Soutnwe 
„pionship, and a 
«ns as a graduat 
on will be an a 
„g shoes that 1 
, ssa Thompson er 
m p S on had been 
years. 




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Chris M 



ly title, Sam Gc 
tball coach of th 
f Demons. Byna 
reachable, gentle 
u ld befriend you 
c h's whistle, 
limply utter thc 
itball coach," ar 
igesareimmediat 
(w the genre— j 
ice, imposing s 
intenance firmly i 
coach has a turbu 
h the media, wl 
as a sadistic 
mehow, this c 
dered violently in 
odwin. 

iure, watch the 
ion on a Saturday 
tdium and glitch' 
rformance ma 
:asional temper 
aid some time wi 
»may almost ber 
aforphilanthrop 
"Coach G" is a tr 
I even more so, hi 
i a people per: 
covered as atimi 
ie sports writer 
wn-home friendl 
•odwin greets a ] 
vice at this sports 
*as immediately 
todwin talked for 
inner in which on 
End in chewing t 
Refreshing doe 
fefy a descriptic 
pona. His pers 
of art. This is 
"ling to a tight, bi 
•Puponencounte 
"•and chat amial 
*ing you feel ii 
Responsibilities 
P-scopeofthe] 
Urates his role 
^cted equal, w 
^oer of the me 
general public 
pots society's 
h coaches and m 
I natural adver 
v ating a placid 
S^hisdiscouraj 
^' a - I say there 
* civility as lc 
^er can ask th 
°btain somethi 
to his readei 
^nately, thi< 
Jj* Goodwin. ( 
^st attributes 



^lize membei 



d °ing their job 
""Ih question 
;n, Pt to assa 
Gently offer; 
c *Planations ■< 
' s °fajust-conc 
Vhedoesn' 
expressions 
. tin >e" song ar 
around 
Te nce, and 
J Z[ Northwes 
^ S Opponents 
r^ h 'of ( ie,,linu 

'Western ism 
J SLC sera 
is direct 
^ught credil 
x e ^orthweste 

1991 Nor 

L Snide muse 
k Ur i- Heistha 
0u rs. Good 
>0u r football 



s 



191 



'ptember 10, 1991 



SPORTS 



Page 11 



,ady Demon basketball has new coaches 



jON TERRY 

J Editor 

^western State's Lady Demon 
, t t,all team will benefit from two 
coaches as University of 

a nsas's Gail Striegler and 

^western' s own Lori Martin join 

Lff this season. 

jjegler, who helped coach the 
y Razorbacks to a No. 9 NCAA 
j n g, a Southwest Conference 
ppionship, and a school record 
rins as a graduate assistant last 
on< will be an assistant coach, 
n g shoes that NSU alumnus 
:ssa Thompson emptied in April, 
^son had been on the staff for 
years. 



rom the 
,ocker Room 



Chris McGee 



ly title, Sam Goodwin is head 
tball coach of the Northwestern 
:e Demons. By nature, he is a very 
roachable, gentle personality who 
uld befriend you at the blow of a 
ch's whistle. 

iimply utter the words "head 
tball coach," and stereotypical 
iges are immediately formed. You 
iw the genre — gruff, bellowing 
ce, imposing stature, intense 
intenance firmly affixed. Perhaps 
coach has a turbulent relationship 
h the media, which may depict 
n as a sadistical antagonist, 
mehow, this conveyance is 
dered violently incompatible with 
odwin. 

lure, watch the Demon boss in 
ion on a Saturday night in Turpin 
dium and glitches in his team's 
rformance may inspire an 
casional temper meltdown, but 
Kid some time with Goodwin and 
iimay almost be moved to endorse 
ifor philanthropist status. 
"Coach G" is a true football man, 
Itven more so, he is a family man 
d a people person. I quickly 
covered as a timid freshman first- 
ie sports writer the respect and 
*n-home friendliness with which 
•odwin greets a person. Being a 
'ice at this sports journalism craft, 
*as immediately set at ease as 
•odwin talked football with me in a 
nner in which one might engage a 
tnd in chewing the sports fat. 
Refreshing doesn't completely 
ls fy a description of Goodwin's 
R ona. His personality is a true 
•rkofart. This is a man who, while 
"ling to a tight , busy schedule, will 
'Pupon encountering you in Kyser 
W and chat amiably with you, thus 
•king you feel important to him. 
Responsibilities are great, his job 
W-scopeofthe public eye. But he 
Urates his role to meet you as a 
^cted equal, whether you are a 
m ber of the media, student body 
eneral public. ' 

Pols society's modus operandi 
loaches and media personalities 
natural adversaries. In fact, 
bating a placid relationship with 
° ac h is discouraged by many in the 
I say there is nothing wrong 
civility as long as Joe sports 
jj^er can ask the tough questions 
obtain something of substance to 
^ to his readership, 
innately, this is possible with 
fc h Goodwin. One of Goodwin's 
"est attributes is his ability to 
Nze members of the media as 
ng their jobs. He realizes that 
° u ?h question is not a flagrant 
L Cni Pt to assail him. and he 
Gently offers sincere opinions 
"P'anations as to the whys and 
s °fajust-concludedgame. What 
he doesn't saturate you with 
expressions. No "one-game- 
'irne" song and dance. 
J* around the Southland 
ere nce, and you will see the 
Northwestern football now 
Opponents now shudder at the 
, e »°l of dealing with trie Demons' 
P: skill-position athletes. 
^ Astern i s now an annual factor 
^ e SLC scramble, and Coach 
jj^'n is directly responsible. He 
i^ r ° u ght credibility and integrity 
^ Northwestern program. 
Hj. e '991 Northwestern football 
a 8uide muses that Goodwin is a 
^ Un - He is that. And, fortunately, 
*id ° Urs - Good luck, coach, to you 
Ur football team this season. 



The 24-year-old Fayetteville, 
Arkansas native played her prep ball 
at Fayetteville high, gam?nr.g All- 
State honors in 1984 and i985. Next, 
she played four seasons at the 
University of Central Arkansas, 
winning All-District honors in 1988- 
89, and then was an assistant coach at 
UCA for a semester while she 
completed her undergraduate studies. 

Striegler was also an honorable 
mention high school Ail-American 
in track and field for two years in the 
shot put and discus, and was All- 
Conference 1986-89 at UCA. 

The new coach's main duties will 
center around recruiting and working 
on the court. While at Arkansas, she 
worked heavily on the court with 



post players. 

"Gail was an outstanding post 
player herself in college and worked 
in that area at Arkansas," said Lady 
Demon head coach James Smith. 
"She will be able to give us a great 
deal of help with our inside players. 

"Coming from a quality program, 
Gail understands what's necessary to 
be successful at the level we want," 
Smith said. "She's a very impressive 
individual, somebody who will be a 
tremendous representative of Lady 
Demon basketball." 

"I'm very excited about the 
program and the job," Striegler said. 
"The Lady Demon program has 
enjoyed great success for a long period 
of time, and it's not by accident. It's 



a thrill to join the team. I'm looking 
forward to getting into the program." 

Martin will re-enter the Lady 
Demon program as a graduate 
assistant coach. Martin collected four 
letters with the Lac\ Demons from 
1985-89, and played on teams that 
went to the 1986 National Invitation 
Tournament championshipgame and 
the 1989 NCAA Tournament. She 
then spent two years as a graduate 
assistant in North western's sports 
information office, working with 
Lady Demon publicity. 

The Anacoco native will be 
primarily responsible for the team's 
administrative needs, as well as 
coaching on the floor and 
coordinating scouting activities. 



"Lori ' s a former player who knows 
our program as well as anyone. 
Nobody loves Northwestern or Lady 
Demon basketball as much as she 
does," Smith said of his ex-player. 
"She'll be a tremendous asset, 
particularly in teaching our new 
players what it means to be a Lady 
Demon and the different aspects of 
our system." 



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Athletic sale scores big 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

The Northwestern Athletic 
Association's recent Scholarship 
Auction 1991 netted approximately 
$40,000 for the athletic department' s 
scholarship edowment fund. 

The auction, held Aug. 24 at Prather 
Coliseum, represented the second 
such event organized by the 
Northwestern Athletic Association. 
The first auction, held in 1989, raised 
$26,000. The Scholarship Auction is 
a biannual affair. 

"The auction went really well from 
a financial standpoint," said 
Northwestern Assistant Athletic 
Director Greg Burke. "We netted 
around $40, 000 after expenses. 
We're really pleased with the 
financial outcome since it's a 
fundraiser." 

The primary objective of the 
Scholarship Auction is to generate 



money for the athletic scholarship 
endowment fund. According to 
Burke, the auction and the annual Joe 
Delaney Celebrity Golf Tournament 
combined to raise approximately 
$80,000 this year. 

"The endowment grows through 
two ways — through activities such 
as these and through gifts," said 
Burke. 

With the future oi state funding in 
question, the Northwestern Athletic 
Association's ultimate goal is to 
endow every athletic scholarship at 
Northwestern. Although that goal 
seems beyond reach, Burke calls 
attention to private schools such as 
Centenary. 

"Centenary, which doesn't receive 
any state funding, has an endowment 
of $30 million or $35 million," said 
Burke. "People may say you'll never 
get that much money. It takes a lot of 
time and money, but you've got to 



have vision. I sometimes wonder if 
someone at Northwestern a long time 
ago would have had this vision, what 
would we have now?" 

A variety of items ranging from art 
and trips to services and sports 
paraphernalia are auctioned away at 
the event. And according to Burke, 
this year's auction was well-attended. 

"There were close to 400 people at 
the auction. There were exactly 380 
people, I think, and over 300 items. 
We had fly-to trips and drive-to trips 
offered. There was some art by some 
good artists. The items ran the gamut 
to even basic services like haircuts," 
said Burke. 

"Everyone had a good time," said 
Burke. "That is important. This is 
one of the most entertaining events 
we have. 

"We put a lot of effort into this. A 
lot of volunteers put an effort into 
making this a first-class event. 
Without them it wouldn't work." 




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----- 



Page 12 



EDITORIAL 



September 10, \ $epte m] 




Current Sauce 



Van Rodney Reed 

Editor 

Elizabeth McDavid Harris 

Managing Editor 
Michelle Genre 
News Editor 
Chris McGee 
Sports Editor 
Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 
Leonard A. Williams 
Lifestyle Editor 
Todd Martin 
Business Manager 



Eric Dutile 
Tina Foret 
Leigh Fly nil 
Russ Harris 
Maria Jones 
Jason Oldham 
Ashley Peterson 

Paul Parker 
Paul Pickering 
Jennifer Roy 
Brian Shirley 
Staff 
Marty Branham 
Lex Harwell 
Tony Means 
Photographers 

Eben Cook 
Chris Needham 

Advertising 
Tom Whitehead 
Adviser 



EDITORIAL 



The Good, 
The Bad and 
The Ugly 



The Good 

It is the beginning of the school year and once 
again there is an enormous flood of new students. 
Northwestern seems to be on a roll again with 
enrollment up and a big win in Demon football. 
Northwestern is marching in the right direction 
again. 

The quality of students, as well as the 
numbers is an awesome thing to imagine. 
Marsha Zulick and her entire staff have done an 
excellent job bring Northwestern the best and 
brightest students. 

Quality students are not only in the 
classroom at Northwestern, the Northwestern 
Demons prove to be a diversified group of student. 
But the team worked as one Saturday night to 
pound Arkansas state. 

Students in the classroom, on the court and 
on the field are proving to be the best of 
Northwestern. 

The Bad 

ARA food services prices are getting. 
Students are tired of paying high prices for their 
food. It is becoming easier, and cheaper, to buy 
foud off campus. ARA needs to set price controls 
on their food in the Union. 

The Ugly 

Residents driving to their classes are starting 
a chain reaction that is causing congested 
parking lots and many angry students. 

There are solutions in the work to solve this 
parking dilemma, however the new parking lot 
will be way to late to help. 

Until the new lot is built, the administration 
wants us to park in the coliseum parking areas. 
Until a shuttle are some type of transportation 
system is provide, no one will park in the coliseum 
zones. 

One note that must be made is that students 
are not unhappy with how many spaces there are, 
as much as they are unhappy with where they 
are. 

As usual there is always a parking problem 
at the beginning of the school year, and as usual 
this one will eventually die down if the resident 
students walk to class. 

There are not enough parking spaces to go 
around and the commuters and faculty are paying 
the price. 



Current Sauce Editorial Policy 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to P.O. Box 5630, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497 or brought by the Office of Student 
Publications in 225 Kyser Hall. 

Letters to the editor must include the author's classification and 
hometown, as well as a telephone number where the writer can be reached. 
No anonymous letters will be printed. The Current Sauce reserves the 
right to edit all correspondence. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discreation of the editor. 



Every c 
The Sauce 
question 
question c 
faults wil 
how the s 
land on a 
The po 




Editor's Journal 



Making the Sauce a better 
voice of the students 



Onegar 
year and I 
nadeoner 
k words ' 
ny mouth. 

Ithasnc 
las done, 
affiliation 
lone anyth 
iroblem. 1 
be financ 
lletic pre 

Every 
lecomes 
nfluence 
-ouisiana ! 



When I sat down with my 
staff to decide how we should 
appoach the Current Sauce, we 
decided the Sauce should offer 
you a comprehensive look at 
news and sports at Northwestern 
combined with light-hearted and 
entertaining features to make for 
informative, but relaxed reading. 

This fall we are offering 
several different ways toexpress 
your opinions in the Sauce. We 
have designed two call in forums 
for you to tell us what is on your 
nrnd. 

The Sauce Poll will be a 
biweekly forum on issues that 
affect Northwestern and 
Northwestern 's students. Every 
otherweek we will putaquestion 
before you. All we ask of you is 
to call in and tell us 'Yes' or 
'No.' We will publish the results 
in the next paper. This is not a 
scientific poll, but it does allow 
us to see the intensity of feelings 



you have on certain issues. We 
will set certain hours to call. 

The Reader's Forum is a 
chance for students, faculty, staff 
and Natchitoches residents to call 
in and leave a brief statement on 
issues concerning them. We open 



thus providing you with another 
voice in the Sauce. Our regular 
columnists will continue to write 
on different issues each week. We 
have also added a sports column. 
"From the Locker Room" will 
provide our sports editors the 



It is just another step we are taking 



to better serve our readers: Northwestern 



Be 



students, faculty and staff. 



up our phone lines each day and let 
you leave a message. We only ask 
that it be brief and pertain to 
something at Northwestern or in 
the news. All we need is your 
name, address and telephone 
number. No anonymous message 
will be printed. 

Each week we will introduce 
you to a guest columnist. We will 
ask a student, faculty, or staff 
member of Northwestern to write 
a column on anything they like, 



chance to express their feeling on 
issues inside Demon Sports. 

Current Quotes are back. Our 
photographers will comb the 
campus asking students, faculty 
and staff questions and getting their 
opinions. Then we will print seven 
people's responses and pictures. 

We will continue to accept 
and encourage letters to the editor. 
Letters are the best way to express 
your opinions because we can offer 
you space to elaborate on an issue. 



We do reserve the right to e | 
letters and it is the discretion 
the editors to which letters 
be printed. We will except 
anonymous letters. 

The Current Sauce « 
continue to offer you the m 
complete listing of events 
campus. But we will go 
beyond being just a calander. 
Sauce will offeryou indepth lot 
at issues that effect North western 

For example, parking 
been a major problem and 
continue to be one as 
university gets larger. TheSd 
will offer two in vestigations 
what is being done and what dl 
universities have done to 4 
their problem. 

These are just a few the 
will allow you to voice 
opinions on issues in the new>fait 
is just another step we are 
to better serve our readers 



letteri 



lilac 
westa 



by Van Rodney Reed 



Readers' Forum 



Reach out and touch 
someone - like the Sauce 



The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
that this feature could be misused for the sole purpose of causing 
embarrassment and pain to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the feature to degenerate to the 
level of a gossip line nor well we allow it to become a political battle 
ground. Complaints and criticisms should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibility to hold the line on this matter, and we 
have determined that each call we receive will be formally evaluated 
by an editorial committee composed of the editorial staff. No "one" 
individual will edit the calls. 



We will evaluate the calls for potential to inspire improvenie' 
any given area and then make a decision whether or not to publi* 
Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an indepe"" 
follow up on the matter. 

To leave a message, just call our number at 357-5096 betu^ 
p.m. and 12 p.m. on weekdays and leave your name, classified 
major, and a brief message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers who requeste" 
opportunity to voice comments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers, 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the caret^ 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



w 



iharon 1 
felodie 

inior, Bi 
In a city 
wouh 
lowing t 
ice in t 
taurant 
I % took ] 
Onenigh 
. went to t 
Ik Cove 
'lax.With 
•atiently 
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" for our ore 
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tali est 



iber 10, \ September 10, 1991 



OPINION 



Sauce Poll 



Vote in The Sauce Poll 



Every other week we will feature 
■r^e Sauce Poll where we ask you a 
question much like this week's 
question on the parking issue. The 
faults will allow us the chance to see 
Ijow the students of Northwestern 
stand on an issue. 
The poll will be conducted each 



weekday. An answering machine Monday thru Friday between 6 p.m. 
will answer your phone calls and and 12 a.m. 

record your vote of "Yes" or "No." This is your forum. By voting, 
You will not have to leave your name, you give us the chance to better serve 

Feel free to tell us more than just you. 
"Yes" or "No." Tell us why you feel 
the way you do. 

The number to call is 357-5096 



The Sauce Poll 



A bi-weekly forum on issues that affect Northwestern State University 

DO YOU SEE A QUICK END TO 
THE PARKING PROBLEM? 



YES 




NO 



The Sauce Poll is not scientific but does serve as an informal gauge of the intensity of feelings on an issue. 



Guest Columnist 

Jerry Roberson 



What exactly is luck? 



Nowadays one of the most popu- 
lar classes of music, that is if music 
can be classified, is rap music. As I 
listened to the lyrics of one of the 
songs Written by rap dynamo/actor. 
Ice T., I noticed an extremely bold 
statement — "You played yourself!" 

Often we hear people refer to some 
unexplainable source called "luck." 

"Oh, I don't know how I got here. 
It was luck." 

"That catch was pure luck. I don't 
know how I did it." 

Well, I propose a question — what 
is luck? 

It has been said that Lady Luck 
can be charmingly nice. It has also 
been said that the lovely lady can be 
deadly. With her devastatingly inex- 
pressible powers. Lady Luck has 
raised the lifestyles of several people 
to a level of existence that could have 
never been obtained without her as- 
sistance. However, she has also left 
many in the gutter of life, totally 
ignorant to what they could have be- 
come. 

A true friend that Lady Luck. 
Smiling in your face and serving you 



a beautiful breakfast this morning, 
but eat with caution, for the evening 
is coming. One can only guess what 
dinner holds in store. Who knows, 
your dinner may get burned. She 
frequently cooks only once a day and 
in some cases, once per life. Nobody 
knows when their meal is going to be 
prepared, so the best thing to do is to 
have your hands washed and be ready 
to eat at all times. One can never tell 
when that devastating meal shall be 
placed on the table. 

So often we go through life over- 
looking the works of this lovely lady. 
For some of us she cooks so often. 
From her pots up above, I wonder if 
we smell the lovely aroma. 

We never know what she is pre- 
paring, but rest assured, whomever 
she is cooking for will have the op- 
portunity to eat a great meal. Never- 
theless, some of us will never be able 
to really appreciate her fine work 
because we refuse to be prepared for 
our serving. Often we indulge in her 
blessings, yet we still do not allow 
ourselves to fully enjoy. We appreci- 
ate it , yet we so often have to settle 



for something she just threw to- 
gether instead of feasting on what she 
has taken her time and prepared so 
ever eloquently. We eat the ham- 
burger instead of the steak. Perhaps 
it is for this reason she sometimes 
only cooks once. 

From what I can see, luck is simi- 
lar to love — not really definable. I 
prefer to define the myth as follows: 
Luck — being prepared when oppor- 
tunity presents itself. 

Perhaps my definition seems 
somewhat simplistic. Luck may only 
come once in a person's life. Don't 
"play your self." Be prepared to eat 
steak with all the trimmings. Have 
your hands washed, napkin in lap, 
and fork and knife in hand. Be pre- 
pared to slice that baby however you 
want. Who knows, this one opportu- 
nity could be your only opportunity 
to eat sirloin. 

Are you prepared for the 
mystical. ..Lady Luck...? Besides, she 
may onlycookforyouonce. Sowhat 
is it going to be, ground beef on 
wheat or sirloin platter with "Ice T.?" 



Suest Columnist 



Paul Parker 



Marketing is the key to Northwestern's future 



er 



One game into the 1 99 1 -92 athletic 
fear and Northwestern has already 
nade one mistake that can only make 
he words "maybe next year" form in 
my mouth. 

It has nothing any coach or athlete 
las done. In fact, nobody in any 
iffiliation with Northwestern has 
lone anything. Doing nothing is the 
iroblem. The problem is marketing, 
the financial backbone of many 
tthletic programs. 

Every year college athletics 
lecomes increasingly financially 
nfluenced. Colleges such as 
-ouisiana State, Notre Dame and the 



le right tor 
le discretion 
ich letters 
will except 

s. 

t Sauce « 
• you the 

of events 
'e will 
acalander, 
•uindepthloC 
l Northwestern, 
!, parking 
>blem and 
; one as 
ger. The Sal 
jstigations 
:andwhatol 

done to q 



University of Miami find themselves 
with sizable television contracts and 
merchandising nationwide to feed a 
national following. While NSU may 
not have an athletic program with the 
history of some major universities, 
we are a college that is starting to 
become an in- state power. Most high 
school students are looking in-state 
for their college. Talk about perfect 
advertising. 

We definitely have the 
characteristics of a school that would 
sell at least as well as most schools 
within the state. The key word is 
would. Northwestern apparently puts 



little, if any, effort in advertising itself 
through marketing. 

Hard to believe? The only city in 
the state with a variety of Demon 
paraphernalia is (drum roll, please) 
Natchitoches. In Shreveport, which 
has no real college athletics, I could 
only find one store selling 
Demonwear. This was very 
depressing after an impressive 
showing by our baseball team last 
'spring. The not-quite-inexpensive 
university bookstore is probably the 
place to shop for such items within 
the Natchitoches metropolitan area if 
you are looking for quality. 



Unfortunately, it's probably safe to 
say that roughly 98 percent of the 
.population of Louisiana has never 
been in the university bookstore. 

In comparison, let's look at our 
good friends at Louisiana Tech. 

After taking a Division I 
shellacking the first year, the weiner- 
Dogs hit their stride and somehow 
found themselves in the Independence 
Bowl. All of a sudden, Tech has 
conquered all non-LSU provinces 
north of Alexandria. An arsenal of 
hats, shirts and underwear soon hit 
the market and soon after, that ugly 
logo became the symbol of north 



Louisiana. 

Some people do not necessarily 
care for the Bulldogs, myself 
included. In fact, I think I would 
rather be arrested for a crime I didn't 
commit than support Tech. My 
mother does work for Tech, but I love 
her anyway. The University of 

Houston recently dominated the 
Bulldogs 73-3. I haven't washed my 
lucky "I Hate Tech" T-shirt since. 
Put simply, only the Tech fraternities 
hate their athletic teams more. 

The in-state market needs another 
winner. Suddenly Northwestern is 
showing signs of becoming that 



winner. Northwestern has produced 
two NFL Rookies of the Year and 
several other impact players. We were 
also, one of the smallest schools 
participating in last spring's college 
baseball regional. An underdog, a 
catchy logo or saying and athletic 
talent will sell anywhere. 

Even if we don't break any sales 
records, at least we will be able to see 
our school' s paraphernalia outside of 
Natchitoches. The bottom line is we 
have to do something. We all want to 
support our school. I would even go 
on the next football road trip but I 
have to wait for that University of 
Houston hat to come in. 



letters to the Editor 



Writers upset with service at Mariner's Restaurant 



8°, k 



y« ly 



a few the Sc 
to voice 
iinthenevApaiti 
f> we are tak'P 

r readers. 

ney Reed 



lharon T. Durham 
felodie L. Bradley 

inior, Business major 
In a city the size of Natchitoches, 
« would not fathom that the 
lowing events would have taken 
'lace in the Mariner's Seafood 
taurant on Sibley Lake. Here is 
I *at took place: 
One night this summer a friend and 
*ent to the Mariner's Lounge — 
he Cove to get a bite to eat and 
e 'ax. With menus in hand, we waited 
la, iently for approximately 10 
"inutes before being approached by 
* e waitress. The first words spoken 
the waitress were, "Have you been 
mg very long?" Our replies, in 
were "Long enough to have been 
Weed." and "Long enough to know 
*hat we W ant." Our first question 
>as . "Do you take checks?" The 
Waitress said, "Yes, we do." and asked 
for our order. We went to The Cove 
A b 8etwhat we considered to be a nice 
f*l. appetizers in this restaurant's 
bunge. 



A few minutes later the waitress 
returned with ourdrinks and informed 
us that the kitchen was closed. 
Because we had gone to eat, we were 
faced with the decision of either 
sending back the ordered drinks or 
one of us having to write a check for 
one drink. The decision was made to 
enjoy the drinks already ordered and 
pay for them right then. One of us 
paid cash, $3.25, which the waitress 
was given $4 and told to keep the 
change. The other one of us paid by 
check, $2.50. The waitress thanked 
us for the tip and left our table. We 
proceeded to enjoy our drinks for 
approximately five minutes before 
being approached, not by the waitress 
who took our order, but by the 
bartender who informed us that the 
check would not be accepted because 
it was an out-of-town check, even 
though it was written by an NSU 
student. We then told her that we had 
already been told by our waitress that 
it would be accepted. We explained 
that we were there for dinner and that 



after taking our dinner order we were 
told the kitchen was closed, and that 
we were prepared to write check for 
more than $2.50. The bartender 
apologized for the trouble and asked 
if we would like to speak to the 
manager, which we both replied, 
"Yes, we would." 

After another small wait, the 
bartender returned with the manager. 
She approached our table and stated 
that she would not accept the check. 
We began to tell her the details of the 
events that had taken place prior. 
Before we could finish explaining 
what had happened, she interrupted 
us with, "I closed the kitchen early, I 
closed it at 9:30." This prompted us 
to ask, "Why didn ' t the waitress know 
that the kitchen was closed when she 
took our order at 10 o'clock?" At this 
point, we acknowledged some major 
communication problems between 
the manager and her employees. 

We asked the manager how long 
the waitress had been working there 
and she replied, "about three months." 



Our reply was, "And she doesn't 
know you don't take out of town 
checks?" Then, she proceeded to 
say, "Well... we take them 
periodically . ' T his is when I sat back 
and my friend said, "You're telling 
me, you take out of town checks 
periodically, but you won't take a 
$2.50 check from a NSU student!?!" 
She said, "You don't know how 
many times I've been burned by out 
of town checks." We suggested that 
she have her waitress cover the $2.50 
check, since she was the one that 
made the mistake by accepting it. 
My friend added, "Why would I write 
a $2.50 check to be charged a $20.00 
NSF fee?" She then said, "Hey, it 
happens, one of my very own 
waitress' wroteahotcheckfor$3.65." 
At this point we realized that nothing 
was being accomplished. 

After telling her who I was and 
how much my family and friends 
supported this Sibley Lake restaurant, 
she snapped, "Then your father, being 
a businessman, should understand 



being burned." By this time we were 
appalled at the gall of this so-called 
businesswoman. Without saying 
anything else she referred to us as 
"cocky girls." Myself, being z8 and 
my friend being 25, we took this to be 
offensive. I told her, "I have been a 
food and beverage manager in 
Houston for several years and in all 
of my work I have never heard of a 
manager speaking to a customer in 
the manner in which you have just 
spoken to us. The customer is always 
right." She then told us, "You two 
have an attitude." Because of the 
shock of ourtreatment by this woman, 
my friend turned to me and said, "I 
can't believe she's talking to us like 
this." She then agreed, reluctantly, 
to accept the check and while 
grabbing it from the table she added, 
"Don't come in here again... and try 
to write a check." We both stood up 
in an erect fashion and left with "Don' t 
worry, I won't ever be back." And, 
just for the record folks, neither one 
of us finished our drink. 



In a matter of 25 minutes, we had 
been literally humiliated, we had been 
embarrassed, and we had also been 
inconvenience, all for the sake of 
$2.50. i.w,Aing at the overaJil 
situation, the bartender was the only 
one that handled it in a manner in 
which was appropriate for a business. 
In a service-oriented establishment 
as this, should anyone have to go 
through an ordeal such as this to get 
a meal? What does it take for the 
college students of Northwestern 
State University, who support 
Natchitoches financially and 
otherwise, year round, to be 
recognized as supporters of the city 
and not always the "bad guys?" With 
the rising enrollment in NSU and the 
money being brought into the 
Natchitoches economy, it is important 
to note that while not all students 
become true residents of 
Natchitoches, the students of NSU 
and their families do generate a great 
deal of revenue for our fair city. 



improve me' 
tot to pubK s 
an indepe"" 

5096 bet^ 
classified 



10 request^ 
readers. 
; the care 



Northwestern faces an 
increasing problem with 
student and faculty parking. 
How have other universities 
handled the problem? We 

asked them. 

A Look At How To Solve Our 



PARKING 
PROBLEMS 




- Next Week In The - 

Current Sauce 



Mil 




LIFESTYLE 



'Boyz N the Hood' sends important social message 



iUPER 

plagi 



A Columbia Pictures Presentation 



Boyz 
N 

the 
Hood 



Written and Directed by 
John Singleton 

Produced by 
Steve Nicoladies 



Principal Cast: 

Ice Cube "Doughboy" 

Cuba Gooding Jr.... "Tre Styles" 

Morris Chestnut "Ricky Baktr" 

Larry Fishburne... "Furious Styles" 



What we liked: 

The reality of the movie 
showed a very believable Los 
Angeles. 

John Singleton's directing 
made the film powerful as well 
as entertaining. 

The subject matter is as 
current as today's headlines. 



What we didn't like: 

The language was a bit 
explicit, but real life is like that 



The movie is rated "R" because 
of language, sexual content, 
and brief nudity 



By LEONARD A. W ILLIAMS and 
SHERYLYN GUILLOT 

Entertainment Writers 

Ever so often, a movie is made 
that relays a message so powerful 
that no matter how small the budget, 
how inexperienced the director or 
unknown the actors, it simply cannot 
be ignored. "Boyz 'N the Hood" 
(which means Boys in the 
NeighborHOOD) is one such movie. 

At first we thought from some of 
the earlier publicity, that this film 
was about gangs, gang violence and 
growing up on the streets of Los 
Angeles. However, after watching 
interviews with the young 23-year- 
old director and recent University of 
California film school graduate John 
Singleton, and stars of the powerful 
film, we quickly changed our minds. 

The film is a story about reality; 
the reality of growing up on the 
rough streets of South Central L.A. 
The movie presents a point of view 
about the three main characters that 
can only be found on the streets. 
Three different people trying to 
survive. 

Doughboy (Ice Cube) and Ricky 
Baker (Morris Chesnut) are brothers 
growing up in the same household 
with the same mother, but each 
brother is treated differently because 
they each have different fathers. 
Doughboy becomes the hoodlum, 
stealing and getting into trouble from 
an early age. His brother, Ricky 
becomes a star athlete and his 
mother' s favorite. The intended point 
is well taken. 

Tre Styles (Cuba Gooding Jr.) is 
the pivotal character in the film 
because he represents a young black 
man who is trying to "do the right 
thing." Tre is shuttled off live with 
his father, Furious Styles (Larry 
Fishburne) because his mother feels 
that he needs a father figure. 

All three characters, Tre, Ricky 
and Doughboy, become good friends 
while they grow up in a city that has 
machine gun fights as brutal as the 
streets of Lebanon. The "hook" of 
this movie is its reality and the social 
commentary it makes. The basis of a 



good movie should be what the viewer 
leaves with after the last reel has been 
completed and the lights come on. 

In the midst of "black" summer 
movies such as Spike Lee's "Jungle 
Fever" and Robert Townsend's "The 
Five Heartbeats," "Boyz" manages 
to make a bold statement. Some critics 
have complained saying that a viewer 
wants to be entertained when buying 
a movie ticket and not given so much 
reality to deal with. However, not 
everyone lives in south Los Angeles. 

It is very easy for people that are 
not living in those conditions to make 
comments about the state of the 
American black male. The movie 
focuses upon a powerful subject that 
we should not ignore nor turn our 
back on. Situations in many black 
communities are steadily becoming 
more and more violent. 
Unfortunately, people without prior 
knowledge to those situations in many 
cases make assumptions and 
generalizations about the whole rather 
than the individual . Tre Styles proved 
that he could rise above his 
surroundings and stand for what he 
believed in. This ethic is the basis for 
many other movies that have passed 
in and out of box offices time and 
time again. 

Tre showed that he could stand on 
what he believed to be right and the 
morals that his father instilled in him. 
His father taueht him that a man was 
not judged by the size of his semi- 
automatic weapon or the number of 
"40' s" he could drink, but rather by 
the strength and courage that it takes 
to be an individual and not a part of 
the crowd. 

"Boyz N the Hood" is dramatic in 
its content and real in its interpretation . 
This movie is not a film for kids and 
not for sensitive adults either. The 
language is explicit and the situations 
are frightening, but the real horror is 
that is not a far cry from the truth. The 
movie is rated R, but the situations 
are much more violent because they 
do happen. "Increase the Peace!" 
(closing credits, "Boyz 'N the Hood") 



Wal-Mart 
Pharmacy 



YOUR HOMETOWN 
CONNECTION 

Attention Students: We will phone 
your hometown doctor or pharmacy 
for your medical needs at no 
additional charge. 
Call us at 352-1941 



we won't Knowingly Be undersold 



Remember Wal-Mart Pharmacy is 
"Your Hometown Connection" 



Pharmacists Name: Richard Zulick 
Store Location: Cane River Shopping Center 
Pharmacy Hours: 9am-7pm Monday thru Saturday 
Phone Number: 352-1941 




WAL-MART AOVERT&ED MCRCMANOtSC POUCY— II * our ntenhon io rwve evwy 
aovFri>s«d ttem <n slock However A due to any uniore*t«n reason an advertiser 
item is not avMaoie 'or purcnuc w* Mart issue a Ram Check on request (or 
tne mercnenoiM to be purchased at in* sale D"ce whenever a»MaO*e or w* sea 
you a sarMar .rem at a comparaoM reduction <n oree We reserve me right io i*nti 
quantities Limitawns votf) <n New Meico 



• I IMf] 



Cuba Gooding, Jr., Larry Fishburne and rap recording artist Ice Cube star in "Boyz N the Hood," a powerful drama j 
coming of age in Black urban America and of street life where friendship, pain, danger and love combine to form reality! 



Hours Mon - Fri 1 0am - 6pm 
Saturday 10am - 5pm 



For Heaven's Sake 
Bookstore 

Only Christian Bookstore in Natchitoches 



N.S.U. Discount 5% 



With I.D 



• Western Union Services 

• Christian T- Shirts 

• Layaway Plans 

• "Color of Love" Greeting Cards 

• Large Selection of Bibles, Books, Plaques, 
and Gifts. 



335Ccnef^er9xpprg 

Center 
IStafchlDchs,LA71457 



"God Bless You" 



Phone# 
357-1670 



CNN correspc 
Ksian Gulf expert 



aboi 



SEPTEMBER 10, 1991 

new rea yet 

FROM THE SAB 



Newsn 



SAB positions still 
open 



The last day to apply for the two Student Activities Board positions that are open 
September 17 at noon. The open positions are Lady of the Bracelet chairperson am 
Cinema Focus chairperson. All applicants must have served as a committee membei persev 
before applying for positions. All applicants must be present at the September 17 meetinfeporti 
of the SAB at 4:00 pm.in the Student Union. 



By MARIA E 
Staff Writer 
JohnHollii 
ews Networ 
first hour 
Iw, spoke 
Northwester 
Auditorium o 
Creative an 
Center. Hisle< 
T^owerof Pers 
Holliman, 
C NN team, ji 
^Oand 
^signed to th 
ni8 coverag 
"Piculture tc 
"My priori 
> do a good j 
ji . ^ng becaus< 
* I've ever \ 
His love 
erance 



•ing job 
"* Gulf War 



On Aug. : 
: u *ait, I wa 



J a 'ne with 
Holl iman sai< 
^ed, I pi 
l^inebunk^ 
Jkrnational 
*»>e go tot 



Campus-wide Star j 
Search announced 

The Student Activities Board introduces Northwesterns' very own "Star Search' n^^ e<1 th £ 
competition. The first qualifying round will be held Thursday, September 19 in the Alley 
The categories open include male and female vocal, solo instrumental, Stand-up comedy' 
and a three (3) person dance category. Applications for Star Search will be accepted ' 
Room 214 of the Student Union between 8 am. and 4:30 pm. on the following date 
Friday Sept. 13 - Tuesday, Sept. 17. The first place winner in each category will recei 
$30.00. A finals will be held in December with a $100.00 Grand Prize and a video tape 
their performance to be sent to Star Search. 

TemcHT 

IN THE ALLEY; ! 




3 men a " dA S3 




three 

Three Men and A Little Lady 



7:00 pnj 



^styje_ 

5Pinions_ 

Action C( 

Si 



JSerSpo 
Sauce 



l^ tudeni 



ljper Sports 

turnovers and Special Teams 
plague Demons, page 6 




Current Sauce 




YEAR of DECISION 
page 8-9 



Lifestyles 

Keeping Northwestern 
Beautiful, page 12 




Tuesday 

September 17, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 7 



Northwestern State University 



ues, 



1670 



CNN correspondent John Holliman visited Northwestern Sept. 12 as part of the Distinguished Lecture Series. Holliman discussed his 
isian Gulf experiences in a forum with the student body. 



CNN's Holliman speaks 

about the power of perseverance 

Newsman tells of Gulf War experiences in Baghdad 



% MARIA E. JONES 
^ tm Staff Writer 

ft ^Hj JohnHolliman.oneofthreeCable 

■■"WsNetwork journalists to report 
first hours of the Persian Gulf 
War, spoke on Sept. 12 at 
Northwestern in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium of the A. A. Fredericks 
Creative and Performing Arts 
Center. His lecture was entitled The 
ower of Perseverance." 
Holliman, part of the original 
C NN team, joined the network in 
19 80 and was the first correspondent 
J* s 'gned to the Washington bureau. 

18 coverage has varied from 
^culture to the White House. 
"My 

priority most of the time is 
p 1 d « a good job at what I do for a 
re ODen i ( ■ u ng because 1 love it- It's the best 
>erson art ever had '" he said - 

, A Has love for his job and great 
e memo perseverance landed Holliman his 
17 meetins ^porting job in Baghdad to cover 
"te Gulf War. 

^ On Aug. 2, when Iraq invaded 
uvvait, I was in Kennebunkport, 
j^'ne with President Bush," 
. "Uiman said. "When the invasion 
j. u n-ed, I picked up the phone in 
j^nebunkport and called CNN's 
, ' ^national desk and said, 'Please 
tni e g to the Gulf someplace.' I 

r Search' ^ med there would be a pretty 



the AIM 
p corned)' 
:cepted ^ 
ing date! 
ill recei* 
leo tape* 



1 story there." 



It took three months, but he got 
the assignment during negotiations 
on a new contract. 

"To get to Baghdad in the first 
place," Holliman said. "I had to beg 
and plead and work very hard on 
my employer to get him to let me 

go" 

Holljman said that he is always 
on the lookout for a good story and 
when things get slow, he reverts 
back to the years he covered the 
farm news for the Associated Press. 

"I'm pretty good at cotton, soy 
beans and things like that," 
Holliman said. "When you are in a 
strange place where you don't know 
anybody, you don't know what to do 
for a story, you go out to a farmer's 
market to do a story and that's what 
I did about the food in Jordan and 
how it was violating the embargo." 

Working around the clock played 
an important part in CNN's coverage 
in Baghdad. 

Holliman said, "While other 
networks assigned to the Gulf 
relaxed, my group of people decided 
that what we had to do, to do a 
better job on the stories than our 
competitors, was work hard. On 
Saturdays and Sundays, the other 
networks' people played tennis or 
swam. CNN was talking to Iraqis 



and setting up equipment — getting 
continuous communication with the 
outside world," Holliman said. "We 
were able to get equipment into the 
country that our competitors 
couldn't." 

CNN was also able to set up 
interviews with the Iraqis that the 
other networks were unable to get. 
Holliman credits their success to 
that "extra effort and hard work." 

"You can succeed in college, in 
my profession, in whatever other 
profession you choose and in real 
life," Holliman said in regard to 
perseverance. "Even if you're not a 
pretty TV person, you can get a job 
on television if you just keep going 
and work at it. If you stick to it and 
pound on people long enough youll 
be OK. 

"I always assumed, when I 
started this 20 years ago, if I stuck 
with it I would be successful and I 
think right now I am successful." he 
said. "You don't have to be a rocket 
scientist, thank goodness, to be a 
success. I am certainly not that and 
what you do have to do is work real 
hard." 

Holliman, along with CNN 
reporters Peter Arnett and Bernard 
Shaw, recently received the Peabody 
Award for their work during the 
Persian Gulf War. 



Career Day expanded 
into week-long event 

Career Week set Sept. 23-27 



By MICHELLE GENRE 

News Editor 

North western's annual Career 
Day has now been expanded into 
Career Week to bring more 
information about the "real world" 
to college students. Scheduled for 
Monday through Friday, Sept. 23- 
27, the expansion will bring more 
speakers, recruiters and business 
representatives to Northwestern in 
order to give students advice about 
careers and the job market. 

Sponsored by Northwestern's 
Department of Counseling and 
Career Services and the Office of 
Cooperative Education, Career 
Week will begin on Monday with a 
banner contest, where organizations 
will display their homemade 
banners having a career-type theme. 
Seminars on selecting a major, 
testing and test interpretation will 
commence the week-long event. 

"We provide opportunities and 
information for students to help 
them make good decisions about 
their careers," said Margaret 
Kilcoyne, coordinator for the Office 
of Cooperative Education. 

On Tuesday, a Career Fair will 
bring a variety of local , national and 
federal businesses to the Student 
Union lobby and ballroom. Students 



will be able to visit the booths where 
they can take career interest 
inventories and receive career 
counseling. Companies attending 
include the FBI, Lincoln National 
Insurance, KALB-TV, Louisiana 
State Civil Service and other major 
businesses. 

Wednesday's and Thursday's 
schedule includes over 30 speakers 
and seminars covering 
departmental topics ranging from 
"What to do with a Degree in Liberal 
Arts" to "Dining Etiquette" and 
"Professional Dressing." 
Professionals will be speaking in 

>cific departments and in classes, 
_a well. T-shirts will be given as 
door prizes before and after the 
seminars. 

Career Week will conclude on 
Friday with more seminars on 
selecting a major, testing and test 
interpretation. The results of the 
banner competition will also be 
announced. 

"The success of Career Week will 
depend upon student participation," 
said Francis Conine, director of 
Career Planning and Placement. 
"The week is not only about finding 
jobs, but about making career 
decisions. We want to give students 
the skills necessary to seek 



employment." 

A special highlight of the week 
will be the student/staff exchange. 
This new program will allow 
students to apply for an 
administrative position at 
Northwestern and work the job for 
a day. Administrators will switch 
places with the student selected for 
their position. Among the positions 
open include president and vice 
president, football coach, controller 
of financial affairs, division director 
of business, dean of students, 
director of financial aid, director of 
admissions and director of Scholars' 
College. 

"This is a perfect opportunity for 
students as well as faculty to 
experience what the other does on a 
day to day basis," Conine said. 

Interested students should apply 
by submitting their credentials, 
including a resume, and 
participating in an interview 
process. Students will be chosen 
based on their interviewing skills, 
resume and cover letter. The 
deadline for applications is Friday, 
Sept. 20. 

For more information on Career 
Week, contact Conine at 357-5621 
or Kilcoyne at 357-5721. 



Demon wins $5000 in lottery 

Jabbia comes home with more than just a win at Arkansas 




Along with preparing for the 
Sept. 14 game at Nevada, many of 
Northwestern State's football play- 
ers were trying to round up a few 
extra dollars for their weekend visit 
to Reno. 

But, de- 
fensive lineman 
Frank Jabbia 
was not — not 
after the sopho- 
more won 
$5,000 in the 
Louisiana Lot- 
tery. 

The 20- 
year-old Slidell native bought the 
ticket at a gas station in Homer. He 
was riding back from Jonesboro, 
Ark. , with his uncle and aunt, David 
and Josephine Summers of 
Powhaten. The night before Jabbia 
made two tackles, including one for 
lost yards, as Northwestern defeated 
Arkansas State, 28-3, on Sept. 7. 

So, Jabbia's luck was running 
pretty good by the time he and his 
aunt and uncle crossed the state 
line that Sunday afternoon, head- 



Jabbia 



ing back to Natchitoches. 

"My aunt decided the first store 
we came across, we were pulling in 
to get some tickets," he said. "She 
bought the first five right in front of 
me. 

"All I had was three ones on me. 
I bought three. The second one, I 
scratched it off and it said $5,000! I 
was going crazy. I was in shock. I 
was shaking. I can work all sum- 
mer and not make $5,000," said 
Jabbia, who tutored third, fifth and 
seventh graders in math and En- 
glish at Boyette Junior High in 
Slidell this summer. 

Winning was a shock to Jabbia 
and to his parents, Pete and Suzanne 
Jabbia, who attended the game and 
then drove back home to Slidell. 
They had a hard time swallowing 
the news. 

"My parents wouldn't believe me. 
They said, 'Shut up, quit lying.' I'm 
always joshing with them. It took 
my aunt and my grandmother to 
confirm it, and then my mom and 
dad were screaming on the phone," 



he said. "They were going crazy." 

Consider $5,000 falling in the 
hands of a college student, and the 
possibilities are frightening, espe- 
cially when that college student 
had a game in Reno in a week, 
where casino gambling is legal. 

But, he said, he that he did not 
plan on taking his winnings to 
Reno.There are a few more impor- 
tant things Jabbia plans to do with 
his money. 

"I'm finally going to be able to get 
an engagement ring for my girl- 
friend, Shantel Richmond, next 
summer," he said. 

"I'm only on half scholarship, so 
I'm going to give my parents back 
the money they came up with for my 
tuition this semester. I'll have about 
$3,000 left over," he said 

Jabbia was still glowing last Mon- 
day when he decided to see if his 
luck was holding. He bought three 
more tickets. 

■ Please see Jabbia, p. 2 




)0 pin; 



Inside 


^!endar_ 


2 


^pus Connection 


3 


^torials_ 


10 


^??tyie_ 


12 


^sin Brief 


2 


^Pinions 


11 


SifT~~ 

^jon Coverage 


8-9 


Sports 


6 


Th ~ — 

Sauce Poll 


11 


y^tiident Newspaper /^Ifff^ 
0r thwestern State University lHlllll/l 
^ cfl itoches, Louisiana 


^ertising 


357-5456 



'Man in Moon' to premiere Oct. 2 



By JENNIFER ROY 

Staff Writer 

After more than a year in 
production, the Natchitoches 
premiere of the film "The Man In 
the Moon" has been scheduled on 
Wednesday, Oct. 2 at the Parkway 
Cinema. 

The movie was filmed in 
Natchitoches and in a number of 
cities in the area including Natchez, 
Black Lake, Robeline, Many and 
Kisatchie Falls. 

The third floor of Kyser Hall was 
converted into the setting for a 
hospital corridor. The Fine Arts 
Auditorium on campus served as 
the sound stage for scenes such as a 
hospital room and a back porch. 

Both Northwestern and the city 
of Natchitoches received credits for 
their cooperation in the movie. 

The screenwriter, Jenny 



Wingfield, spent her early childhood 
in the Natchitoches area. Her 
memories serve as the basis for the 
story of two teenage sisters whose 
relationship is threatened when 
they both fall in love with the same 
boy. 

"The Man In The Moon" stars 
Academy Award nominees Sam 
Waterson and Tess Harper and 
veteran actress Gail Strickland as 
the parents of the teenagers. Reese 
Witherspoon, Emily Warfield and 
Jason London are introduced in the 
roles of Dani and Maureen Trent 
and Court Foster. 

Director ftobert Mulligan was 
nominated for an Academy Award 
for work in "To Kill a Mockingbird" 
and Producer Mark Rydell was 
nominated for an Academy Award 
as director of "On Golden Pond." 

The film is dedicated to the 



memory of production designer and 
two-time Oscar winner Gene 
Callahan who died four months after 
its completion. 

The premiere will begin with a 
champagne reception at 7 p.m. 
followed by the screening at 8 p.m. 

The cinema, in keeping with the 
setting of the film, will be decorated 
in a 1950s theme. 

Tickets are $25 and include a 
printed program and other 
souvenirs. 

The proceeds from the premiere 
will be donated by MGM-Pathe to 
the Northwestern State University 
Foundation. 

Tickets may be purchased by 
writing to The Man In The Moon, 
P.O. Box 5555. NSU, Natchitoches, 
La. 71497, or by calling 357-5213. 




Emily Warfield and Jason London star in MGM's The Man in the Moon 



Page 2 



September 17, 19 



Calendar 
of Events 



today 

3 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 

will be held in the IM Building 

7 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features 
Hamlet in The Alley 

WEDNESDAY 

Noon 

IM Swim Meet Registration 
Deadline 

3 p.m. 

IM Swim Meet, Rec. Complex 
5 p.m. 

IM Flag Football Registration 
Deadline 

7 p.m. 

IM Flag Football Team Cap- 
tains Meeting, IM Building 

THURSDAY 

IM Flag Football Pre-Season 
Tournament 

SAB Star Search, Alley 

FRIDAY 

Noon 

National League for 
Nursing Exam, room 108 of 
Williamson Hall 

2 p.m. 

Writing Proficiency Test, 
Kyser Hall 

SATURDAY 

8 a.m. 

BSU Golf Scramble, Demon 
Hills 

7 p.m. 

Demon Football 

The Demons travel to University 
Texas El Paso. 

MONDAY 

Career Week begins 



News In Brief 



■ Nursing students must 
take national test 

Any nursing student who plans 
to petition to enroll in clinicals in 
January 1992 must take the 
National League for Nursing 
Exam from noon to 4:30 p.m. on 
Friday, Sept. 20 in room 108 of 
Williamson Hall. 

Please bring a $20 certified 
check or money Tjrder. No 
personal checks or cash will be 
accepted. A pictured ID will also 
be required. For more 
information, come by the Nursing 
Office in room 101 of the Home 
Economics Building or call 357- 
6776. 

m Northwestern appoints 

registrar 

Hugh C. Durham III has been 
named acting registrar at 
Northwestern. 

Durham's appointment was 
announced by Dr. Robert Alost, 
Northwestern's president. The 
appointment is subject to 
approval by the State Board of 
Trustees for State Colleges and 
Universities. 

Durham, the former 
coordinator for Northwestern's 
Central Louisiana program in 
Alexandria, replaces Lynda 
Tabor, who has been named 
Director of Adult Learning at 
Northwestern. 

Prior to joining Northwestern 
in September 1989, Durham was 
assistant director at student 
personnel services officer at 
Alexandria Vocational Technical 
Institute. He has also served as a 
vocational consultant. 

Durham served in the U.S. 
Army for 20 years. He served in 
Vietnam as a pilot, platoon 
commander and commander. He 
was also an assistant professor of 
military science at Northwestern. 

In addition, Durham was the 
Deputy United States Defense 
Representative to Pakistan at the 
U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, 
Pakistan. Before his retirement 
from the army, he was executive 
officer to the deputy post 
commander and director of 
personnel and community 
activities at Fort Polk. 

Durham has a bachelor's and 




The Spirit of Northwestern recently performed during a game at the Superdome. 



master's degree from 
Northwestern. 

His new duties include 
interpreting university policies 
and regulations, maintaining 
official student records and 
insuring that student records are 
accurate and accessible. 

■ Faculty display work 

Recent publications by 
Northwestern faculty are now on 
display in the Eugene P. Watson 
Memorial Library. 

The Academic Endeavors 
Showcase features papers and 
studies by Northwestern faculty 
published since 1987. 

In addition to teaching, faculty 
members at Northwestern conduct 
ongoing research and attend 
conferences around the country to 
present their research. Watson 
Library arranged the display to 
provide recognition for the faculty 
and share the results of research 
with students. 

Faculty members included in 
the display are Dr. Norann Y. 
Planchock and Suzanne Prevost of 
the Division of Nursing; Dr. Curt 
Phifer and Dr. Fraser Snowden of 
the I^ouisiana Scholars' College; 
William Nelles of the Department 
of Language and Communications; 



Dr. Dick Stalling of the 
Department of Life Sciences; Dr. 
Celia Decker and Dr. Virginia W. 
Williams of the Division of 
Education; Dr. Paralee Norman of 
Northwestern-Fort Polk and Dr. 
Ada Jarred, Abbie Landry and 
Sissie Mayeaux of Watson Library. 

Other faculty members will have 
their work displayed as their 
works are published in the fall. 

The showcase, which will be in 
the library throughout the fall 
semester, was created by Deborah 
Jackson of the Career Evaluation 
and Information Center located in 
Watson Library. 

■ Education study organized 

Dr. Alex Aichenger's public 
administration class is involved in 
a project which will examine the 
administration of education at 
Northwestern. The project will 
investigate such areas as 
administrative organization, 
departmental organization, 
student government, Scholars' 
College and student life in general. 
Other areas of interest will 
include the quality and 
availability of faculty, quality of 
curriculum and overall intellectual 
environment. 

The ultimate goal of this project 



is to publish a complete report on 
Northwestern education at the ent 
of this semester. Any student or 
faculty input should be sent to 
room 345-F of the Social Sciences 
Department. 

■ Rodeo team saddles up for 
competition 

The NSU Rodeo Program is 
underway with 10 rodeos 
scheduled for the 1991-1992 
season. 

This year's team has two 
returning cowgirls, Penny 
Williams, a freshman from 
Pineville, and Cherie D'Amico, a 
junior from Morganza. Williams 
will compete in team-roping and 
break-away roping, while D'Amico 
will compete in goat-tying. 

New to the NSU team are Shane 
Lewis, a freshman from 
Alexandria, and Derrick Milam, a 
freshman from Oak Hill. Lewis 
and Milam will both compete in 
team-roping and calf roping. 

Several other cowboys and 
cowgirls are planning to attend 
Northwestern in the spring and 
compete in the last six rodeos. 

The first rodeo scheduled for 
this season is at Northeast Texas 
Community College in Mount 
Pleasant on Thursday through 
Saturday, Oct. 3-5. All those 
interested in trying out for the 
team need to contact Rebecca 
Merchant iri room 218 Williamson 
Hall or call 357-5914. 

■ Spirit of Northwestern 
play for Saints 

The Spirit of Northwestern 
Demon Marching Band performed 
pregame and halftime shows Sept. 
15, in the Louisiana Superdome 
before 68,000 fans as the New 
Orlean Saints beat the Los 
Angeles Rams. 

This was the band's second 
invitation to play for the Saints in 
the past three years. 

Their pregame performance 
included a theme song from Back 
to the Future and the Demon spell 
out and fight song. 

Patty Breckinridge, Miss LOB, 
joined the band singing "God Bless 
the USA" in Northwestern's half 
time tribute to America. 




Curreir ptembe 
Sauce^J 



P.O. Box 5306 ^uarfere 
Northwestern State Univerait, J|C nH ' 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71491 0rg anizatic 
cups 140 - 660) ithacurrentn 
submitted to 
jvities and 



How to reach the Sauc< |^sd. ay 



rt- ,n ' 

To subscribe to The Sauejf^^ 



Subscriptions 

To place an ad 

Local ads 
National ads 



357 



ftlV 



Oct. 



jzation t 



52 U charter frc 
r or ganizatior 

SS?-!*^ 6 ' Carl 
rT^dent i 



357-5? tua 

Irgaruzat 10118 ' 

Question about billing and a 

Sales Manager 357-54 f the p 

Business Manager 357-5? rit* 1 11 

AH organi 

quired to mi 



To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 
Editor 

Editorial/Opinion 
Lifestyles 
News 
Sports 



The Current Sauce is locate! 
the Office of Student Publication! 
225 Kyser Hall. 



The Current Sauce is publish 
every week during the fall by 
students of Northwestern State Ui 
versity of Louisiana. Itisnotassq J 
ated with any of the university's i 
partments and is financed indei 
dently. 



^intheorgai 
357-5, ply exception 
357-50 eceived at a d 
357-50 -eCercle F, 

357-54 Jepa rtment :. 
357-54 Orgarnzatio 

357-54 . n 

3 hif< 



ecei 



irran 



The deadline for all advertii 
merits is 5 p.m. the Thursday I 

fore publication. 



•Bat res 
o conti 



Inclusion of any and all mal 
rial is left to the discretion of 
editor. 



The Current Sauce will not! 
printed on November 26, 1991 due 
the university's Thanksgiving 
day. 



H lift 



The Current Sauce is entered! 
second-class mail at Natchitoche 
LA. 



Postmaster: send address changes li 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

© Current Sauce 



Students converge on IM building 
More than 1 ,600 use campus facilities 



After one full week of operation 
the Leisure Activities Department 
recorded a record 1 ,648 participants 
in the Intramural/Recreation 
Building. Students, faculty and staff 
alike are enjoying the weight room, 
gymnasium and game room. 

The first organizational meeting 
of Leisure Activities Ambassadors' 
was held on Wednesday. This newly 
formed group is comprised of 
representatives from throughout the 
campus. The function of the group is 
to encourage and promote 
involvementin the Leisure Activities 
program and to serve as an advisory 
board for the Leisure Activities 
Department. Any organization 
interested in having a representative 
attend Leisure Activities 
Ambassadors' Meetings should 
contact the Leisure Activities Office 
at 357-5462. 

The Leisure Activities 
Department will hold its annual 
Intramural Swim Meet Wednesday 
at the Recreation Complex beginning 
at 3 p.m. Events for this year's meet 



Jabbia: Not 
real gambler 



■ Continued from p. 1 

"The first ticket I scratched off 
had two $5,000s. But the third one 
didn't come. I was hoping to collect 
$10,000 instead of $5,000, but I'm 
not too disappointed," he said. 

His teammates have taken no- 
tice of his good fortune. 

"I have more friends now than I 
ever had in my entire life. 
Everybody's coming up saying 
they're broke and need money. They 
all need something, $5, $10, $1,000 
... but it's all in fun," he said. "I've 
been enjoying it." 

Jabbia said that he isn't a gam- 
bling man, generally. 

"I like going to the horse races 
every now and then, trying to win 
some money. Never have before," 
he said. "This is the first time I've 
won anything." 

Jabbia said that he will probably 
keep buying a few lottery tickets 
from time to time but his top prior- 
ity is to keep winning on the football 
field. 



include the 200 meter medley relay, 
25 meter freestyle, 25 meter 
backstroke, 25 meter breaststroke, 
25 meter butterfly, 50 meter 
breaststroke, 50 meter freestyle and 
the 200 meter freestyle relay. Teams 
are comprised of six members with a 
men's and a women's division. All 
students, faculty and staff interested 
in the Intramural Swim Meet should 
sign up in the Leisure Activities 
Office no later than noon Wednesday. 

Intramural Flag Football will 
snap into action Wednesday with a 
Team Captains Meeting at 7 p.m. in 
room 114 of the Intramural/ 
Recreation Building. There will be 
men, women and co-recreational 



leagues. All persons interested in 
playing Intramural Flag Football 
should sign up in the Leisure 
Activities Office by 5 p.m. 
Wednesday. All team captains must 
attend the Tvam Captains Meeting 
or they will not be scheduled for 
competition. 

A Pre-Season Flag Football 
tournament will be held on Thursday 
beginning at 3 p.m. on the ROTC 
fields. The Pre-Season Tournament 
will give teams the opportunity to 
practice their skills while checking 
out the competition. League play 
begins Monday at 3:30 p.m. on the 
ROTC and Intramural fields. 




fleritacye 

FAM I LY PORTRAITS 

Guys & Gals 



Fall Opening 



Sept. 18, 1991 l-9pm 
Open House 

Refreshments 
and Door Prizes 



Let us introduce you to the new fall styles 
We have 6 operators to serve you. 
Faculty/ Staff and Students Welcome. 

Walk-in's- Welcome • > 



Mon-Fri 9am-Till 
Sat 9am-2pm 



In the Student Union 
357^5451 



^Z^hiversity 
bookstore 



"Shirt of the Week" 



College House 
Multi-Color Sweatshirts 

Available 
Reg $28.90 Sale $15.95 

Offer Good Thru Sept. 20 



Dr. Curtis 
" •ofessor of biol 
iolars' Colle 
antof$31,14( 
I >undation of I 
The three-j 
fer's projec 
echanisms 
utritive Cont 

its." 

Under the 
udy young ra 
gestive syster 
work wit! 
(plications. 

"The hums 
iman disorde 
Brexia and ob 
j life," said 1 
~mt whether 
«»e problems 
sunders tandi 
ntrols what 
iderstand ho 
ntrols what v 
Phifer wo: 
«tead of adul 
ith the young 
see how the i 
"Studies 1 
Diversity led 
'angratpupsc 
Mrols," he sa 
a rat pup ii 
*>n't matter 
Wose.milkoi 
atexist begin 
*aning up to 
•at we get ii 
"densedtime 
e 'ngestive b< 
This all fit 
*ard under 
lr »ous syst< 
Mates the 
Savior or phj 
Phifer's or 
nded by Nor 
Univer 
""inistrators 
The prelin 
important 
« to get i 
"^ded by CI 
The three- 
Srl y supple 
^80 and $6,! 
p >ve Nort 
assist Phifi 
^assistant 
° n e student 
"^er. Thre< 
' tlto nthepr 
Colle 
White 
|. a, *founda 
r* ar ch in bio 



Go 



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er 17, is 



rren* 



5 ptember 17, 1991 



NEWS 



Page 3 




.S?»iv mil J#Chartere<l Organizations 

~Q r ganization Renewal Cards 
(j, a current membership list must 
bmitted to the Office of Student 
jvities and Organizations by 



uiaiana 7149] 



fti 



the Sauq «esd av ' . 



Oct. 1 in order for an 
to remain in good 
The Saucing- Organizations failing to 
357 55 so w 1 " forfeit their recognition 
pfj charter from Northwestern. If 
nor ganization fails to comply with 
357 5i jis r^ e ' ^ ar ' Henry, director of 
357-5? tudent Activities and 
^ganizations, will withdraw the 
n art« r an organization will 
the privileges that go along 



billing 



357-54; * e . 
357-5? it 11 ll 



lews 



on 



^11 organizations are also 
e quired to maintain a NSU P.O. 
^ % in the organization's name . The 
357 5j nly exception is to have the mail 
357 50 eceived at a department, such as 
357-50 * Cercle Fran cais-Language 
357-54 lepartment 

Organizations must also make 



357-54 
357-54 



iuce is located 
t Publication) 



iuce is publish 
the fall by 

atern State 

. It is not assu J 
university's 

lanced indei 



or all advertii 
s Thursday! 



iscretion of 



iuce 
r26, 1991dm 



t Natch itocln 



dress changes! 
Box 5306. NSU, 
J< 71497. 



Sauce 



3 hifer 
eceives 
trant 

■•O 

"Bat research 
o continue 



lite 



Dr. Curtis B. Phifer, assistant 
v arid all mal lessor of biology in the Louisiana 
''iholars' College, has received a 
antof$31,140 from the Whitehall 
will notl "nidation of Palm Beach, Fla. 

The three-year grant will cover 
mksgiving Hirer's project "Development of 
echanisms Underlying the 

jutritive Control of Ingestion in 
entered ^ » 

Under the grant, Phifer will 
udy young rats to see how their 
gestive system works. Phifer says 
work with rats has human 
iplications. 

"The human relevance is that 
unan disorders such as bulimia, 
rorexi a and obesity can begin early 
life," said Phifer. "Predictions 
it whether a human will have 
problems can begin by age 2. 
y understanding how a rat's brain 
ntrols what it does, we can 
nderstand how a human brain 
ntrols what we do." 

Phifer works with rat pups 
stead of adults because working 
ith the young animals allows him 
see how the animal develops. 

Studies I started at Duke 
Nversity led to the belief that 
lu ng rat p ups don't show most adult 
Mrols," he said. "All that matters 
a rat pup is a full stomach, it 
*sn't matter what it is, water, 
Uc ose, milk or whatever. Controls 
at exist begin working during pre- 
ening up to about 21 days. So 
tat we get is a model within a 
Sensed time of 2 1 days. We get to 
e "igestive behavior develop. 

"This all fits into studies aimed 
*ard understanding how the 
•^ous system and the brain 
plates the animal in terms of 
"avior or physical development." 

Phifer 's original studies were 
ided by Northwestern's Council 
University Research 
"•"nistrators. 

The work I did was 

^ important and would have been 
irc * to get without the funds 
*vided by CURIA," said Phifer. 

The three-year grant provides 
*% supplements of $17,268, 
*° and $6,992. 

ftve Northwestern students 
^ist Phifer during the project 
Assistants. Thegrantprovides 
student to assist during the 
^jmer. Three other students will 
j* °n the project as part of their 

j^rs' College senior thesis. 
^ The Whitehall Foundation is a 
at e foundation that funds basic 
s J^ch in biology. 



sure that all events are placed on 
the university master calendar. 

For additional information, 
contact Henry in room 214 of the 
Student Union or at 357-6511. 

Beta Beta Beta 

Beta Beta Beta, a national 
honorary biological society, will hold 
a meeting at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 
Sept. 26 in room 1 06 of the biological 
sciences building. Anyone 
interested in biology or any biology- 
based major is welcome to attend. 

For more information call Lisa 
at 357-5677. Recently-elected 
officers for the 1991-1992 year are 
Lisa Landry, president; Bertha 
Barnard, vice president; Monica 
Slay, treasurer and Chris Kevil, 
secretary. 

Black Student Association 

The Black Student Association 
will have a meeting at 7:30 p.m. on 




Wednesday, Sept. 18 in Kyser 
Auditorium. 

Wesley/Westminster 
Foundation 

Wesley/Westminster 
Foundation, the Methodist and 
Presbyterian Student Center, has 
announced i ts weekly events for this 
month. There will be a Sunday night 
supper and chapel service from 5 to 
6 p.m. The Monday night movies 
will start at 7 p.m. On Tuesdays, 
lunch will be served from 1 1 a.m. to 
1 p.m. 

Special events planned for 
October include a bowling and 
hamburgers get-together on Friday, 
Oct. 4 and a Haunted House on Oct. 
31. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. 

All young ladies interested in 
becoming a member of Zeta Phi 



' Beta Sorority Inc. are invited to a 
membership intake reception at 7 
p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 22 in the 
President's Room of the Student 
Union. Dress will be semi-formal. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. will 
be sponsoring a dance at 9 p.m. on 
Friday, Sep.. 20 at Ruby's Blue 
Room, located in the Self-Help 
Shopping Center on Martin Luther 
King Jr. Drive. Admission will be 
$2. 

"Showtime at the Apollo-Zeta 
Style" has been postponed until 8 
p.m. on Friday, Sept. 27. This event 
will be held at Ruby's Blue Room 
and a dance will follow the show. 
Anyone interested in participating 
should contact Yalaunda Taylor at 
357-1094, or Marie Johnson at 352- 
\iOA jjefbre Wednesday, Sept. 25. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
Inc. 

Alpha Kappa Al pha Sorority Inc . 
will be holding its Fall 1991 Rush 



Party in the President's Room of the 
Student Union at 6:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Sept. 18. All girls 
interested in becoming a member 
are encouraged to attend. Attire will 
be semi-formal. 

Public Relations Student 
Society of America 

PRSSA will meet Wednesday, 
Sept. 18 at 7 p.m. in room 225 Kyser. 
Officers meet at 6:15 p.m. in Room 
225 of Kyser before the formal 



meeting. 

The fund-raising committee will 
meet today at 2 p.m. in room 225 
Kyser. 

Anyone interested in PRSSA is 
encouraged to attend. 

IESEARCH NF0RMAH0N 

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Order Catalog Today with Visa / MC or COD 

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ISEP brings French student to NSU 



By FRED TAULBEE 

Staff Writer 

The International Student 
Exchange Program has brought 
Laurent Charrier to Northwestern 
from La Tulevriere, France. 

"Louisiana is 
^flMhAh very exotic — the 
■ bayous, the big 
plan-tations," 
'"**]E sa '^ Charrier. 
™ JT Although 
the 22-year-old 
has never been 
in the United 
States before, he 
says that he does 



Charrier 

not miss home. 

"I have no problem to meet 
people in the town, because always, 
they are very, very nice," he said. 

Charrier said that the French 



are very fond of their heritage here 
in Louisiana, and he recognizes this 
in some of the street names like 
Demeziere. 

"The South is very popular in 
France because of the movies like 
'Gone With the Wind,' " he said. 

Charrier has studied history and 
has thought about teaching it, but 
he said that he is more interested in 
working for a museum. 

He has studied English for seven 
years, but he has barely spoken it 
for the last four years. He carries a 
French/English dictionary with him . 
At Northwestern, he is taking a 
beginning French class to help him 
relearn his English. He said that he 
wants to help anyone taking a 
French class because it helps him 
with his English. 

Northwestern students schooling 



abroad through ISEP include 
Marcus Jones at South West 
Polytechnic in England, Ida Lu 
Shows at Universidad de Santiago 
de Compostela in Spain and Marny 
Stein at the University of Utrecht 
in the Netherlands. Almost 100 
foreign schools participate in the 
exchange program, including 
universities as close as Canada, 
as far away as Hong Kong and as 
culturally rich as several African 
countries and the Federal Republic 
of Germany. 

The application deadline for 
any Northwestern students 
interested in ISEP is Jan. 25. Most 
forms of financial aid can be 
applied toward participation in 
the program. For more information 
contact Tommy Whitehead in 
room 103 Kyser Hall. 



Discover Kinko's. 
You get more than 
just great copies. 

When you're checking out the campus, be sure 
to check out your local Kinko's. You'll find just 
about everything you need to help you complete 
course projects, including... 
y Quality black and white copies, 
S Transparencies, 
/ Macintosh® rental, 
S Poster-size copies, 
/ Binding, and more! 
/ We're open early and 

late, 7 days, to help 

you make those last 

minute due dates! 



kinko's 

the copy center 



352-8155 

510 College 



CS93 




Good news for 
people who shop 



wot jfumrmMht 




Now you can use the Card for everything 
the Campus Bookstore sells/ 

Now it's easier than ever to pick up Plato, discover Proust, or even show your 
colors with a new campus sw eatshirt. Just pay for whatever you need at the 
bookstore with the American Express' Card. 

No American Express Card? No problem. 

To become a Cardmember just complete and return one of the American Express 
Student Applications available at the bookstore. Once you're approved, you can 
enjoy added student Card privileges like discounted roundtrip airfares on 
Continental Airlines and great new long-distance savings with MCI. 

So shop your bookstore t< >dav From classic books to classic wear, jSB 
the news is . . .you can use t he Card for everything you buy. flfl Cards 



Northwestern State University— University Bookstore 

Student Union Building, Caspari Street 

Store hours: August 19-23, 7:30 am-5:30 pm. 

Your Best Place to Shop! 



Page 2 



September 17, 19 



Calendar 
of Events 



TODAY 

3 p.m. 

Flag Football Officials Clinic 

will be held in the IM Building 

7 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features 
Hamlet in The Alley 

WEDNESDAY 

Noon 

IM Swim Meet Registration 
Deadline 

3 p.m. 

IM Swim Meet, Rec. Complex 
5 p.m. 

IM Flag Football Registration 
Deadline 

7 p.m. 

IM Flag Football Team Cap- 
tains Meeting, IM Building 

THURSDAY 

IM Flag Football Pre Season 
Tournament 

SAB Star Search, Alley 

FRIDAY 

Noon 

National League for 
Nursing Exam, room 108 of 
Williamson Hall 

2 p.m. 

Writing Proficiency Test, 
Kyser Hall 

SATURDAY 

8 a.m. 

BSU Golf Scramble, Demon 
Hills 

7 p.m. 

Demon Football 

The Demons travel to University 
Texas El Paso. 

MONDAY 

Career Week begins 



News In Brief 



■ Nursing students must 
take national test 

Any nursing student who plans 
to petition to enroll in clinicals in 
January 1992 must take the 
National League for Nursing 
Exam from noon to 4:30 p.m. on 
Friday, Sept. 20 in room 108 of 
Williamson Hall. 

Please bring a $20 certified 
check or money Tjrder. No 
personal checks or cash will be 
accepted. A pictured ID will also 
be required. For more 
information, come by the Nursing 
Office in room 101 of the Home 
Economics Building or call 357- 
6776. 

M Northwestern appoints 

registrar 

Hugh C. Durham III has been 
named acting registrar at 
Northwestern. 

Durham's appointment was 
announced by Dr. Robert Alost, 
Northwestern's president. The 
appointment is subject to 
approval by the State Board of 
Trustees for State Colleges and 
Universities. 

Durham, the former 
coordinator for Northwestern's 
Central Louisiana program in 
Alexandria, replaces Lynda 
Tabor, who has been named 
Director of Adult Learning at 
Northwestern. 

Prior to joining Northwestern 
in September 1989, Durham was 
assistant director at student 
personnel services officer at 
Alexandria Vocational Technical 
Institute. He has also served as a 
vocational consultant. 

Durham served in the U.S. 
Army for 20 years. He served in 
Vietnam as a pilot, platoon 
commander and commander. He 
was also an assistant professor of 
military science at Northwestern. 

In addition, Durham was the 
Deputy United States Defense 
Representative to Pakistan at the 
U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, 
Pakistan. Before his retirement 
from the army, he was executive 
officer to the deputy post 
commander and director of 
personnel and community 
activities at Fort Polk. 

Durham has a bachelor's and 




The Spirit of Northwestern recently performed during a game at the Superdome. 



master's degree from 
Northwestern. 

His new duties include 
interpreting university policies 
and regulations, maintaining 
official student records and 
insuring that student records are 
accurate and accessible. 

■ Faculty display work 

Recent publications by 
Northwestern faculty are now on 
display in the Eugene P. Watson 
Memorial Library. 

The Academic Endeavors 
Showcase features papers and 
studies by Northwestern faculty 
published since 1987. 

In addition to teaching, faculty 
members at Northwestern conduct 
ongoing research and attend 
conferences around the country to 
present their research. Watson 
Library arranged the display to 
provide recognition for the faculty 
and share the results of research 
with students. 

Faculty members included in 
the display are Dr. Norann Y. 
Planchock and Suzanne Prevost of 
the Division of Nursing; Dr. Curt 
Phifer and Dr. Fraser Snowden of 
the Louisiana Scholars' College; 
William Nelles of the Department 
of Language and Communications; 



Dr. Dick Stalling of the 
Department of Life Sciences; Dr. 
Celia Decker and Dr. Virginia W. 
Williams of the Division of 
Education; Dr. Paralee Norman of 
Northwestern- Fort Polk and Dr. 
Ada Jarred, Abbie Landry and 
Sissie Mayeaux of Watson Library. 

Other faculty members will have 
their work displayed as their 
works are published in the fall. 

The showcase, which will be in 
the library throughout the fall 
semester, was created by Deborah 
Jackson of the Career Evaluation 
and Information Center located in 
Watson Library. 

■ Education study organized 

Dr. Alex Aichenger's public 
administration class is involved in 
a project which will examine the 
administration of education at 
Northwestern. The project will 
investigate such areas as 
administrative organization, 
departmental organization, 
student government, Scholars' 
College and student life in general. 
Other areas of interest will 
include the quality and 
availability of faculty, quality of 
curriculum and overall intellectual 
environment. 

The ultimate goal of this project 



is to publish a complete report on 
Northwestern education at the end 
of this semester. Any student or 
faculty input should be sent to 
room 345-F of the Social Sciences 
Department. 

■ Rodeo team saddles up for 
competition 

The NSU Rodeo Program is 
underway with 10 rodeos 
scheduled for the 1991-1992 
season. 

This year's team has two 
returning cowgirls, Penny 
Williams, a freshman from 
Pineville, and Cherie D'Amico, a 
junior from Morganza. Williams 
will compete in team-roping and 
break-away roping, while D'Amico 
will compete in goat-tying. 

New to the NSU team are Shane 
Lewis, a freshman from 
Alexandria, and Derrick Milam, a 
freshman from Oak Hill. Lewis 
and Milam will both compete in 
team-roping and calf roping. 

Several other cowboys and 
cowgirls are planning to attend 
Northwestern in the spring and 
compete in the last six rodeos. 

The first rodeo scheduled for 
this season is at Northeast Texas 
Community College in Mount 
Pleasant on Thursday through 
Saturday, Oct. 3-5. All those 
interested in trying out for the 
team need to contact Rebecca 
Merchant iii room 218 Williamson 
Hall or call 357-5914. 

■ Spirit of Northwestern 
play for Saints 

The Spirit of Northwestern 
Demon Marching Band performed 
pregame and halftime shows Sept. 
15, in the Louisiana Superdome 
before 68,000 fans as the New 
Orlean Saints beat the Los 
Angeles Rams. 

This was the band's second 
invitation to play for the Saints in 
the past three years. 

Their pregame performance 
included a theme song from Back 
to the Future and the Demon spell 
out and fight song. 

Patty Breckinridge, Miss LOB, 
joined the band singing "God Bless 
the USA" in Northwestern's half 
time tribute to America. 




CurrenK e,nbe 
Sam 




P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State Universe 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 7148] 

(UPS 140 - 660) 



How to reach the Sauq b 
To subscribe to The Sauc« M ing . 



Subscriptions 



357-52 j 



To place an ad 

Local ads 357- 
National ads 357- 

Quesoon about billing 

Sales Manager 357- 
Business Manager 357- 



54 u : 
5? tu 



5J I* 



To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 357 

Editor 357 

Editorial/Opinion 357- 

Lifestyles 357-1 

News 357-54 

Sports 357 



The Current Sauce is located 
the Office of Student Publicationi 
225 Kyser Hall. 



The Current Sauce is publish 
every week during the fall by 
students of North western State Ui 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso J 
ated with any of the university's ( 
partments and is financed inde] 
dently. 



^Charter* 

] organ>zati 
jth a currenti 
jjjbmittedU 

levities an. 
"esday, Oct 
zation 
Org 
go will fori 
j charter fr 
or ganizatio 
s r ule, Cai 
dent 
jganizations 
,arter and ; 
the privi 
it. 

All organ 
quired to m 
oX intheorg£ 
ly exceptioi 
ived at a 
Cercle f 
lartment. 
Organizati 



50** 
50 ' e 
5#P 



Tphif 



ece: 



irran 



"Rat res 
ocont 



LA 



Students converge on IM building 
More than 1 ,600 use campus facilities 



After one full week of operation 
the Leisure Activities Department 
recorded a record 1,648 participants 
in the Intramural/Recreation 
Building. Students, faculty and staff 
alike are enjoying the weight room, 
gymnasium and game room. 

The first organizational meeting 
of Leisure Activities Ambassadors' 
was held on Wednesday. This newly 
formed group is comprised of 
representatives from throughout the 
campus. The function of the group is 
to encourage and promote 
involvement in the Leisure Activities 
program and to serve as an advisory 
board for the Leisure Activities 
Department. Any organization 
interested in having a representative 
attend Leisure Activities 
Ambassadors' Meetings should 
contact the Leisure Activities Office 
at 357-5462. 

The Leisure Activities 
Department will hold its annual 
Intramural Swim Meet Wednesday 
at the Recreation Complex beginning 
at 3 p.m. Events for this year's meet 



Jabbia: Not 
real gambler 



■ Continued from p. 1 

"The first ticket I scratched off 
had two $5,000s. But the third one 
didn't come. I was hoping to collect 
$10,000 instead of $5,000, but I'm 
not too disappointed," he said. 

His teammates have taken no- 
tice of his good fortune. 

"I have more friends now than I 
ever had in my entire life. 
Everybody's coming up saying 
they're broke and need money. They 
all need something, $5, $10, $1,000 
... but it's all in fun," he said. "I've 
been enjoying it." 

Jabbia said that he isn't a gam- 
bling man, generally. 

"I like going to the horse races 
every now and then, trying to win 
some money. Never have before," 
he said. "This is the first time I've 
won anything." 

Jabbia said that he will probably 
keep buying a few lottery tickets 
from time to time but his top prior- 
ity is to keep winning on the football 
field. 



include the 200 meter medley relay, 
25 meter freestyle, 25 meter 
backstroke, 25 meter breaststroke, 
25 meter butterfly, 50 meter 
breaststroke, 50 meter freestyle and 
the 200 meter freestyle relay. Teams 
are comprised of six members with a 
men's and a women's division. All 
students, faculty and staff interested 
in the Intramural Swim Meet should 
sign up in the Leisure Activities 
Office no later than noon Wednesday. 

Intramural Flag Football will 
snap into action Wednesday with a 
Team Captains Meeting at 7 p.m. in 
room 114 of the Intramural/ 
Recreation Building. There will be 
men, women and co-recreational 



leagues. All persons interested in 
playing Intramural Flag Football 
should sign up in the Leisure 
Activities Office by 5 p.m. 
Wednesday. All team captains must 
attend the Team Captains Meeting 
or they will not be scheduled for 
competition. 

A Pre-Season Flag Football 
tournament will be held on Thursday 
beginning at 3 p.m. on the ROTC 
fields. The Pre-Season Tournament 
will give teams the opportunity to 
practice their skills while checking 
out the competition. League play 
begins Monday at 3:30 p.m. on the 
ROTC and Intramural fields. 




FAMILY PORTRAITS 

Guys & Gals 



Fall Opening 



Sept. 18, 1991 1 - 9 pm 
Open House 

Refreshments 
and Door Prizes 



Let us introduce you to the new fall styles 
We have 6 operators to serve you. 
Faculty/ Staff and Students Welcome. 

Walk-in's- Welcome • > 



Mon-Fri 9am-Till 
Sat 9am-2pm 



In the Student Union 
357^5451 



<«%iiversity 
bookstore 



ith 



"Shirt of the Week" 



College House 
Multi-Color Sweatshirts 

Available 
Reg $28.90 Sale $15.95 

Offer Good Thru Sept. 20 



The deadline for all advertii 
merits is 5 p.m. the Thursday) 

fore publication 

Dr. Curtis 

Inclusion of any and all mat fl f ess0 r of bio 
rial is left to the discretion of tl .jj^gj-g' Coll 

edit0r antof$31,14 
The Current Sauce will not I nidation of 
printed on November 26, 199 1 duel The three- 
the university's Thanksgiving Ho lifer's proje 
day. echanisms 

utritive Con 
The Current Sauce isenteredi ^ " 
second-class mail at Natch Hocht jj n 6! er thi 

udy young r 
gestive syste 

Postmaster: send address changes it le work wit 

Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU, iplications. 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. The hum 
man disordi 

© Current Sauce .„ ■ < . 

lorexia and ol 
fe," said 
it whethei 
problemi 
understand 
itrols wha 
iderstand h 
mtrols what 
Phifer w< 
stead of adu 
the young 
see how the 
Studies 
niversity let 
"mgratpups 
"itrols," he si 
rat pup : 
«8n't matte 
"Mse, milk c 
W exist begii 
faning up ti 
we get 
Sensed tim 
'ngestive b 
"This all fi 
*ard unde 
'rvous syst 
Mates the 
Savior or ph 
Phifer's o 
«ded by Noi 
Unive 
^nistrator 
"Theprelii 
^"mportani 
to get 
"^ded by C 
. The three 

*jy suppi, 

^Oand $6 
p ive Nor 
assist Phi 
^assistan 
' »estuden 
^rier. Thre 

7 on the p: 
liars' Coll. 
. T he Whit 
N found, 
^•"ch in bi< 



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sr 17, lj 



rr©iF ptember 17 ' 1991 

KU 



NEWS 



Page 3 




5306 

te Universi 
isiana 7149; 

660) 



the 

rhe Sauced' 1 

357-5? d 



u| chartered Organizations 

^Q r ganization Renewal Cards 
jj, a current membership list must 
' ubtnitted to the Office of Student 
t j V ities and Organizations by 
Oct. 1 in order for an 



357 
357-52 



to 



filling 

357-; 
357-1 



BWS 



357 
357 
357 
357 
357-54 
357 



an ization to remain in good 
iding- Organizations failing to 
^ will forfeit their recognition 
charter from Northwestern. If 
organization fails to comply with 
rule, Carl Henry, director of 
,j e nt Activities and 
Ionizations, will withdraw the 
iar ter and an organization will 
^fcse the privileges that go along 

organizations are also 
.quired to maintain a NSU P.O. 
oX jn the organization's name. The 
y exception is to have the mail 
ved at a department, such as 
Cercle Francais-Language 



52 il 



54 ■* 
5^' 



uce is located 
Publication! 



we is publ: 
the fall by 
item State 
It is not asso 5 
university'8i 
anced indei 



r all advertii 
Thursday I 



uce will not 
26, 1991 duel 



50 * 

department. 

Organizations must also make 



Phifer 



eceives 
|[rant 

Tlat research 
o continue 



me 

m i 



Dr. Curtis B. Phifer, assistant 
i and all mai ^fggsor of biology in the Louisiana 
scretion of | Co ii e g ei has rece ived a 

snt of $3 1 , 1 40 from the Whitehall 
randation of Palm Beach, Fla. 
The three-year grant will cover 
iiksgiving Hofcfer's project "Development of 
echanisms Underlying the 
utritive Control of Ingestion in 
ice is entered s (<," 

; Natchitochi Under the g,.^ phifer win 

ndy young rats to see how their 
gestive system works. Phifer says 

lresschange S |* work with rats has human 
lox 5306. NSU, (plications. 

a 71497. "The human relevance is that 
man disorders such as bulimia, 
lorexia and obesity can begin early 
jjife," said Phifer. "Predictions 
it whether a human will have 
problems can begin by age 2. 
y understanding how a rat's brain 
mtrols what it does, we can 
iderstand how a human brain 
mtrols what we do." 

Phifer works with rat pups 
stead of adults because working 
ith the young animals allows him 
see how the animal develops. 

Studies I started at Duke 
niversity led to the belief that 
"mg rat pups don't show most adult 
'ntrols," he said. "All that matters 
a rat pup is a full stomach, it 
*sn't matter what it is, water, 
ie, milk or whatever. Controls 
a t exist begin working during pre- 
ening up to about 21 days. So 
hat we get is a model within a 
Sensed time of 2 1 days. We get to 
*'ngestive behavior develop. 

"This all fits into studies aimed 
*ard understanding how the 
[ fvous system and the brain 
elates the animal in terms of 
Savior or physical development." 

Phifer's original studies were 
fded ^ Northwestern's Council 
University Research 
"""'nistrators. 

The preliminary work I did was 
*y important and would have been 
ir d to get without the funds 
^ded by CURIA," said Phifer. 

The three-year grant provides 
! arl y supplements of $17,268, 
'^0 and $6,992. 

Pive Northwestern students 
jj 1 a ssist Phifer during the project 
^assistants. The grant provides 
student to assist during the 
"Hmer. Three other students will 



°n the project as part of their 
College senior thesis. 



The Whitehall Foundation is a 
L a te foundation that funds basic 
c h in biology. 



sure that all events are placed on 
the university master calendar. 

For additional information, 
contact Henry in room 214 of the 
Student Union or at 357-6511. 

Beta Beta Beta 

Beta Beta Beta, a national 
honorary biological society, will hold 
a meeting at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 
Sept. 26 in room 106 of the biological 
sciences building. Anyone 
interested in biology or any biology- 
based major is welcome to attend. 

For more information call Lisa 
at 357-5677. Recently-elected 
officers for the 1991-1992 year are 
Lisa Landry, president; Bertha 
Barnard, vice president; Monica 
Slay, treasurer and Chris Kevil, 
secretary. 

Black Student Association 

The Black Student Association 
will have a meeting at 7:30 p.m. on 



Wednesday, Sept. 18 in Kyser 
Auditorium. 



Wesley/Westminster 
Foundation 

Wesley/Westminster 
Foundation, the Methodist and 
Presbyterian Student Center, has 
announced its weekly events for this 
month. There will be a Sunday night 
supper and chapel service from 5 to 
6 p.m. The Monday night movies 
will start at 7 p.m. On Tuesdays, 
lunch will be served from 1 1 a.m. to 
1 p.m. 

Special events planned for 
October include a bowling and 
hamburgers get-together on Friday, 
Oct. 4 and a Haunted House on Oct. 
31. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. 

All young ladies interested in 
becoming a member of Zeta Phi 



Beta Sorority Inc. are invited to a 
membership intake reception at 7 
p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 22 in the 
President's Room of the Student 
Union. Dress will be semi-formal. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. will 
be sponsoring a dance at 9 p.m. on 
Friday, Sep.. 20 at Ruby's Blue 
Room, located in the Self-Help 
Shopping Center on Martin Luther 
King Jr. Drive. Admission will be 
$2. 

"Showtime at the Apollo-Zeta 
Style" has been postponed until 8 
p.m. on Friday, Sept. 27. This event 
will be held at Ruby's Blue Room 
and a dance will follow the show. 
Anyone interested in participating 
should contact Yalaunda Taylor at 
357-1094, or Marie Johnson at 352- 
W*i before Wednesday, Sept. 25. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
Inc. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. 
will be holding its Fall 1991 Rush 



Party in the President's Room of the 
Student Union at 6:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Sept. 18. All girls 
interested in becoming a member 
are encouraged to attend. Attire will 
be semi-formal. 

Public Relations Student 
Society of America 

PRSSA will meet Wednesday, 
Sept. 18 at 7 p.m. in room 225 Kyser. 
Officers meet at 6:15 p.m. in Room 
225 of Kyser before the formal 



meeting. 

The fund-raising committee will 
meet today at 2 p.m. in room 225 
Kyser. 

Anyone interested in PRSSA is 
encouraged to attend. 

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ISEP brings French student to NSU 



By FRED TAULBEE 

Staff Writer 

The International Student 
Exchange Program has brought 
Laurent Charrier to Northwestern 
from La Tulevriere, France. 

"Louisiana is 
very exotic — the 
bayous, the big 
plan-tations," 
said Charrier. 

Although 
the 22-year-old 
has never been 
in the United 
States before, he 
Charrier 8ay s that he does 
not miss home. 

"I have no problem to meet 
people in the town, because always, 
they are very, very nice," he said. 
Charrier said that the French 




are very fond of their heritage here 
in Louisiana, and he recognizes this 
in some of the street names like 
Demeziere. 

"The South is very popular in 
France because of the movies like 
'Gone With the Wind,' " he said. 

Charrier has studied history and 
has thought about teaching it, but 
he said that he is more interested in 
working for a museum. 

He has studied English for seven 
years, but he has barely spoken it 
for the last four years. He carries a 
French/English dictionary with him . 
At Northwestern, he is taking a 
beginning French class to help him 
relearn his English. He said that he 
wants to help anyone taking a 
French class because it helps him 
with his English. 

Northwestern students schooUng 



abroad through ISEP include 
Marcus Jones at South West 
Polytechnic in England, Ida Lu 
Shows at Universidad de Santiago 
de Compostela in Spain and Marny 
Stein at the University of Utrecht 
in the Netherlands. Almost 100 
foreign schools participate in the 
exchange program, including 
universities as close as Canada, 
as far away as Hong Kong and as 
culturally rich as several African 
countries and the Federal Republic 
of Germany. 

The application deadline for 
any Northwestern students 
interested in ISEP is Jan. 25. Most 
forms of financial aid can be 
applied toward participation in 
the program. For more information 
contact Tommy Whitehead in 
room 103 Kyser Hall. 



Discover Kinko's. 
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When you're checking out the campus, be sure 
to check out your local Kinko's. You'll find just 
about everything you need to help you complete 
course projects, including... 
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Now it's easier than ever to pick up Plato, discover Proust, or even show your 
colors with a new campus sweatshirt. Just pay for whatever you need at the 
bookstore with the American Express' Card. 

No American Express Card? No problem. 

To become a Cardmember just complete and return one of the American Express 
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\ 



Page 



NEWS 



September 17, i 



Debate team 
falls to 
British foes 

North western's debate team was 
defeated by a team from Great 
Britain in a debate exhibition held in 
the Magale Recital Hall in the AA. 
N^redericks Creative and Performing 
ArtkXenter on Sept. 6. The topic 
argueS^as "It Ain't What You Say, 
It's How\u Say It." 

NSU debaters Buddy Hays and 
Sean Lemoine Segued the negative 
position while Kh» Preston and 
Helen Berry took the affirmative for 
the British team. 

The debate was held in a 
modified parlimentary format 
similar to the style used in Great 
Britain. It is a less structured style 
and has a great deal of interaction 
between debate teams and the 
audience. 

After the arguments ended, the 
audience was asked to vote for the 
team which had argued their point 
most effectively. 

"It was a very interesting and 
entertaining event," said Jennifer 
Berry, a sophomore from Pineville. 
"It was the first such event I have 
attended, and I would like to see 
another one come to Northwestern." 

Preston and Berry are currently 
traveling throughout the United 
States holding debates at colleges 
and universities. The tour is 
sponsored by the Speech 
Communications Association. 




NSU receives aquaculturc 3 center fund septe,r ' be 
$167,000 in state funds given to beigin operation 



Northwestern has received 
$167,000 in state funding to begin 
operation of a aquaculture research 
center on the Red River. 

The center will be located on 340 
acres at Lock and Dam #3 across the 
Red River from Colfax, according to 
Dr. L.I. "Ike" Smart, dean of 
cooperative programs and 
agriculture at Northwestern. 

Funding for the project was 
obtained in the state appropriations 
bill through the Louisiana State 
University Experiment Station as a 
River Water Research Station. A 
total of $439,000 was appropriated 
for the project. Northwestern 
received approximately 38 percent 
of the appropriation. Louisiana 



State University plans to set up 
similar centers on the Red River as 
part of the joint project. 

Northwestern hopes to receive 
additional funding in future years 
through the state appropriations bill 
and the capital outlay bill. 

The land at Lock and Dam #3 is 
now held by the Red River Waterway 
Commission. A headquarters 
building on the land belongs to the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The 
Corps and the commission have 
agreed to give their holdings at the 
site to Northwestern. 

Future plans for the facility 
include the construction of fish 
raceways. Fish would be placed in 



the concrete raceways which n 
run through a portion of the 
Water taken from the Red ] 
and on-site wells would cirt 
through the raceway with nitj 
and waste removed. 

Aquatic plants and veget, 
would also be grown at the sit 

The growing of aquatic pl^ 
an area with a great dej 
potential," said Smart. "In thei 
of Florida, income produced | 
aquatic plants is greater than 
from catfish and allig 
production. The products 
aquatic plants and the fish j 
area that can generate incon 
the center." 



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Page 6 



September 117, 199 e ptemt 



SUPER SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 



Northern Illinois 22, Arkansas St. 21 
UTEP 22, New Mexico St. 21 
East Texas St. 20, Pittsburgh St. 13 
Oklahoma 40, North Texas 2 




SW Missouri 7 McNeese 3 
Northeast La. 21, Georgia Southern 13^ 
Idaho 41, Southwest Texas 3» 
Sam Houston 37, Texas Southern 6 



Demons drop ball and game to Nevada in 45-14 setbacC 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Spor ts Editor 

Nevada was not a gracious host 
Saturday, but the Northwestern 
Demons sure were generous guests. 

Despite approximating Nevada's 
total yardage output, the Demons 
threw four interceptions, lost three 
fumbles and suffered two blocked 
punts in presenting the Nevada 
Wolfpack with a charitable 45-14 
win in raucous Mackay Stadium. 

Although the score seems to 
indicate Nevada domination, the 
game, aside from the costly miscues 
and an imbalance in special teams' 
play, was a fairly even match. 

Northwestern piled up 354 total 
yards offensively to Nevada's 396, 
but turnovers and blocked punts 
led to a sudden deficit. 

Nevada converted two blocked 
punts and a fumble by Northwestern 
inside the Demon 20-yard-line into 
21 quick points late in the first 
quarter. The scoring barrage 
required only 3:15 and 38 yards. 
When Wolfpack quarterback Fred 
Gatlin hit Joe King with a seven- 
yard scoring pass to bring the score 
to 21-0 with :04 seconds left in the 
first quarter, the Demons had to all 
but abandon their game plan. 

"From there, it became a whole 
different ball game," said Demon 
Coach Sam Goodwin. "They got 21 
quick points and we were 



scrambling." 

Special teams woes contributed 
to the Demons' ills. Besides the two 
blocked punts, Nevada capitalized 
on a Demon fumbled punt snap, 
averaged 14 yards on five punt 
returns and contained the Demons 
to under 20 yards on all but one 
kickoff return. 

"They did a super job on special 
teams and we didn't," said Goodwin. 
"The punt blocks were just part of it. 
They were tremendous on punt 
returns and did an excellent job of 
covering kickoffs until the game was 
out of reach." 

"The punt blocks made the 
difference," said Nevada Coach 
Chris Ault. "Their defense played 
well. Our defense played well. But 
we turned the game on special 
teams." 

The game symbolized a portrait 
of misery for the Demon offense, 
which didn't score until late in the 
third quarter. Besides the seven 
turnovers, Demon quarterbacks 
struggled to get the ball to open 
receivers. 

"We threw a bunch in the ground, 
couldn't hit open receivers," said 
Goodwin. "They did a good job of 
playing us, because we had to work 
hard for anything we got. In that 
situation, any mistake you make is 
magnified, and we made plenty of 
mistakes." 



The Demon offense struggled 
with the option game, and 
quarterback Brad Brown hit on just 
7 of 19 passes for an anemic 37 
yards. The situation was 
compounded by injuries to running 
backs Deon Ridgell (bruised Achilles 
tendon) and Kelvin Pierre (possible 
concussion), which forced Goodwin 
to move Brown to running back and 
press A.J. Maranto and Chris 
Gilliam into splitting quarterback 
duty. 

"We were struggling with the 
option game from the start," said 
Goodwin. "They did a good job on 
that. The quick 21 points forced us 
out of the game plan, but the way 
they were defending us, we would 
have gotten away from it soon 
enough, anyway." 

A Gatlin 13-yard scamper and a 
Gatlin five-yard touchdown pass to 
Tom Williamson accounted for 
Nevada's first two scores. A blocked 
punt by the Wolfpack's DeWayne 
Sparks set up Gatlin's scoring toss 
to King to put Nevada atop 21-0 at 
the end of the first quarter. 

Despite the lopsided final score, 
the Northwestern defense 
performed admirably, according to 

Goodwin. 

"Take away our problems on 
special teams, and our defense did a 
good enough job to give us the chance 
to win," said Goodwin. "We forced 



five turnovers. They only had four 
drives over 30 yards, and one of 
those came with their front-line 
players still on the field at the end." 

Andre Carron spearheaded the 
Demon defensive efforts, collecting 
15 tackles, including two sacks and 
three tackles for losses. Carron is 
no w 2 1 tackles shy of Gary Reason's 
career total tackles record. 

Nevada piqued the fire into an 
inferno in the third quarter, scoring 
17 points to put the game out of 
reach at 38-0. One of the scores, a 
44-yard field goal by Rick 
Schwendinger, came after a bad 
punt snap by the Demons gave the 
Wolfpack the ball at the Demon 
eight-yard-line. 

The Demons finally scored at the 
3 :34 mark in the third quarter when 
Guy Hedrick scored on a three-yard 
run. North western's second and 
final score came on a two-yard 
scoring sweep by Lawann Latson 
with 7:56 left in the game. The 
Wolfpack tacked on a final 
touchdown when backup 
quarterback Chris Vargas found 
King on a nine-yard touchdown pass 
late in the fourth quarter. 

Brown, Maranto and Gilliam 
combined on 13 of 32 passingfor 172 
yards and four interceptions. Ridgell 
rushed 11 times for 52 yards while 
Gilliam carried four times for 53 
yards. Latson led Demons receivers 
with five catches for 81 yards. 



Carron leads defense by example 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

His physique is imposing. His 
game-face scowl is intimidating. The i 
"crunch" of his impact cascades 
chillingly around the stadium. 

A mythical aura seems to 
accompany his reputation, and yet 
he is no myth. To ball carriers, he is 
reality. To teammates, he is the 
"Terminator." To the rest of us he is 
Andre Carron, Northwestern's All- 
American linebacker. 

In three seasons, Carron, a senior 
from Opelousas who bench presses 
a team-best 450 pounds, has collated 
a reputation as a mogul in the pain 
industry for the Demons. 
Northwestern coaches could 
probably design a lengthy film 
exclusively featuring coma-inducing 
hits that Carron has applied on 
opponents. 

Carron does not pepper the media 
with comments regarding violent 
acts he wishes to perform on the 
doomed enemy, but one can sense a 
raging inferrto inside of him that 
burns for the big hit. His play evinces 
it and his coach recognizes it. 

"He goes for the kill," said 
Northwestern head coach Sam 
Goodwin of his star. "He doesn't 
just want to hit the guy, he wants to 
hurt him. As long as he plays that 
way within the legal rules, that's a 
great athlete to have." 

As a senior Ail-American, 
Carron's defensive teammates look 
up to him. He reciprocates by giving 
them a perfect example of ferocity 
by which to follow. But he leads by 
doing, not talking. 

"I just try to be one of the leaders 
on defense," said Carron. "I try to 
lead by my actions instead of words. 
I just try to get my teammates fired 
up." 

Fired-up is one thing Carron 
always is on game day. The 
linebacker usually starts channeling 
into a home game the day before by 
coming to the field house and letting 
the surroundings encourage him to 
meditate on the next day's opponent. 
Come kickoff, he's ready for a search 
and destroy mission. 

Carron's vigor sometimes moves 
him to launching some angry words 
at the other team, but he claims he 
is no taunter. 

"I don't taunt," says Carron. "Ill 
say something just to let them know 
I'll be back, but as far as taunting, I 
don't really do that. I don't know 
where that started." 

Carron's intensity and bone- 
rattling hits inspire his teammates 
to mimic his style. Sometimes, it is 
contagious. 

"I think he's put his trademark 
on this defensive team," said 
Goodwin. "Other guys want to hit. 




Demon senior linebacker Andre Carron sacks North Texas quarterback Scott Davis. Carron is just 21 tackles 
away from setting a new Northwestern career record. 



We had more hard hits in this game 
against Arkansas State than I think 
we've ever had." 

In that contest, Carron recorded 
14 tackles and a sack in garnering 
The Sports Network's Division I- 
AA Defensive Player of the Week 
award. He also claimed the 
Louisiana Defensive Player of the 



Week and the Southland Conference 
co-Player of the Week honors. 
Carron, whose 154 tackles in 1990 
earned him the Louisiana Defensive 
Player of the Year award, entered 
the season just 50 tackles shy of the 
school's career tackle record held by 
former Demon and current New 
York Giant star Gary Reasons. 



If Carron tries to model his game 
after anyone, he says it would have 
to be Chicago Bears' All-Pro 
linebacker Mike Singletary. The 
two mirror each other in attitude 
and production. What's more, they 
are both run-stuffers. 

■ Please see CARRON, p.7 



Intramural Flag Football 
Team Captains Meeting 

Men-Women-Co Rec Leagues 
All Team Captains Must Be Present 

Wednesday, September 18th 

7:00pm, Room 1 14 
Intramural/Recreation Bldg 



Entry Deadline - Wednesday, Sept. 16th 5:00pm 
For More Information Call 357-546 1 



Demon Box 



7 7 14 
Navada 21 17 7 45 

Ntv-Gatlm 13 run (Schwendinger kick) 
Nev-Williamscn 5 pass from Gatlin 
(Schwendinger kick) 

Nev-Kmg 7 pass from Gatlin (Schwendinger 
kick) 

Nev-Singieton 29 pass from Gatlin 
(Schwendinger kick) 

Nev-Schwendinger 44 FG 

Nev-Reeves 7 pass from Vargas 
(Schwendinger kick) 

NSU-Hedrick 3 run (Fernandez kick) 

NSU-Latson 2 run (Fernandez kick) 

Nev-Kmg 9 pass from Vargas (Schwendinger 
kick) 

A-1B.382 

NSU Nevada 

First Downs 15 20 

Rushes-Yards 41-182 43-168 

Passing Yards 172 228 

Comp-Att-Int 13-32-4 21-36-3 

Return Yards 44 115 

Punt-Avg 7-26.6 5-41.0 

Fumbles-Lost 3-3 2-2 

Penalties- Yards 5-40 10-65 

Time of Possession 28:55 31:05 

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

RUSHING-NSU, Gilliam 4-53. Ridgell 11-52, 
B. Brown 15-25. Tappin 2-19. Maranto 3-18. 
Pierre 2-15. Hedrick 2-4. Latson 1-2, Rorex 

1- (-6) Nevada. Moore 18-90, Smith 17-70, 
Gatlin 9-18. Vargas 1-(-10). 

PASSING-NSU. B. Brown 7-19-1. 37 yards. 
Gilliam 4-6-1. 82 yards. Maranto 2-7-2, 53 yards- 
Nevada Gatlin 13-26-3, 150 yards, Vargas 
8-10-0, 78 yards. 

RECEIVING-NSU, Latson 5-81 . Jones 2-27. 
Tappin 2-12, S. Brown 1-36, Robinson 1-12, 
Treadway 1-5. Ridgell l-(-1), Nevada, Smith 
5-36, Reeves 4-68. Hampton 4-39, Singleton 

2- 45. King 3-20. Moore 1-9, Senior 1-6, 
Williamson 1-5. 



NCAA l-AA 
Top 20 Poll 

1 . Nevada 

2. Idaho 

3. (tie) Eastern Kentucky 
(tie)Furman 

5. Northern Iowa 

6. Boise State 

7. Middle Tennessee 

8. Delaware 

9. Georgia Southern 

10. Holy Cross 

11. William & Mary 

12. (tie)Tenn. -Chattanooga 
(tie)Sam Houston 

14. Southwest Texas 

15. Alabama State 

16. Villanova 

17. Southwest Missouri 

18. Northeast Louisiana 

19. Appalachian Stat€» 

20. New Hampshire 



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• 117, 199Lptember 17, 1991 



SPORTS 



Page 7 



Southern 13 
3» 

ltliem 6 



, JON TERRY 
" Editor 



jady Demons win at home 



EiCk 



fjorthwestern's Lady Demon 
country team won it's own 
' 8gon -opening Northwestern 
■jational Thursday, narrowly 
^jjng out Northeast and 
jjjsiana Tech. Northwestern's 
jo placed second, behind Tech but 
, a i of Northeast, 
freshman Maryalyce Walsh 



'oil 



it ucky 



n th e overall race for NSU with a 
^ e f 12:09.66 for the two-mile 



Carla Davison ( 13 :23.78) and 



Norris (13:36.17) also made 
W p ten for NSU, placing sixth 
->[id eighth respectively. 

The victory is considered an 
p S et for the Lady Demons. Not 
j v were both of the opponents 
!r y strong teams, but Tech had 
^jved votes in the recent NCAA 
jstrictVIpoll. 

This is a great win, a super 



way to open the season," said third 
year coach Chris Maggio. "We beat 
two awfully good teams. This, for 
us, is like our football team's win 
over Arkansas State - a very strong 
statement to open the season." 

Other finishers for the Lady 
Demons were Marie Gipe (13:57.55) 
at 11th, Julie Martin (14:15.82) at 
13th, Karen Current (14:35.30) at 
14th, and Dianne Dubay (14:47.20) 
at 18th. 

In the men's four-mile race, 
the Demons were led by freshman 
Damien Rosado at with a time of 
21:15.96 and sophomore Billy 
Gaines at fourth in 21:24.37. Tech 
finished five runners in the top nine 
places. 

"Damien's effort was 
impressive because he went out with 
the leaders and went to win the 
race," said men's coach Robert 
Ferguson. "Those guys are older 
than him and eventually, hell be 



with them." 

Only ten of Northwestern's 
20 possible runners competed in the 
meet. Other finishers were Brad 
Seivers (22:18.47) at tenth, Kerry 
Gray (22:58.26) at 13th, Red 
O'Laughlin (23:45.82) at 17th, 
Albert Hernandez (23:46.45) at 18th, 
Rene Corando (23:48.44) at 19th, 
Tim Rosas ( 24 : 1 7 .85 ) at 20th, Robbie 
Bryer (24:38.08) at 21st, and Danny 
Broughton (22:25.30) at 22nd. 

"Overall, intensity and effort 
pleased me today," Ferguson said. 
"We've been working hard, didn't 
let up in our training for this meet, 
and that showed. We've got a lot of 
people excited about running and 
we seem to be coming together well. 
They all have high goals for 
themselves." 

Both squads will compete 
again Saturday in the Louisiana 
Tech Invitational in Ruston. 



Volleyball slumps at home 



ni 



inooga 

n 

5 



>uri 

ana 



iron n 




j;5.oo 



4) 



lyjON TERRY 

ports Editor 

Some say that statistics don't 
ill the whole story, and this past 
re ek the Lady Demon volleyball 
[am seamed bent on proving that 
jeory. Despite numbers that, on 
aper could have been big wins, lost 
ipo close matches at home to drop 
ie ir season record to 0-3. 

The Lady Demons opened 
heir home season against Louisiana 
ech Tuesday with a 15-13,6-15,3- 
5, 11-15 loss. Northwestern jumped 
ut to a big lead, then held off a Lady 
echster rally to win the first game 
efore plunging for the next two. 
ISU again jumped out big early in 
ie fourth game, but then let an 1 1- 
advantage slide away for the loss. 

Freshman Shera Dowell led 
ie Lady Demon attack with 14 
ills on a .316 hitting pace, and 
iinior Claire Gilmartin added 8 
lore kills. Senior Sandi Sherrill 



also added 3 service aces. 

NSU got a rematch Thursday 
with Arkansas-Little Rock, who had 
beaten the Lady Demons in their 
season opener. But not even the 
home court advantage was enough 
as Northwestern dropped a 
heartbreaker 13-15, 15-13, 15-11, 
14-16, 8-15. 

Northwestern fought the first 
game hard, and took the next two 
games with that same tenacity. In 
the fourth game, however, the Lady 
Demons started looking tired, and 
blew a big lead and a game-point. 

Claire Gilmartin and Shera 
Dowell had 27 and 21 kills for the 
Lady Demons, accounting for over 
two thirds of their hitting power. 
Gilmartin finished at a .446 hitting 
percentage, and Dowell hit at a .269 
rate. The squad hit .250 overall, 
badly showing up UALR's .146 
percentage. 



Sandi Sherrill added seven 
service aces to the offensive output, 
along with 51 assist s. 

One big mistake that seems 
to be plaguing the Lady Demons 
this season, and may have cost them 
Thursday's match, is reception. NSU 
has allowed 48 service aces in the 
past three matches, including 19 
against UALR Thursday. 

"Right now reception errors 
are killing us," coach Rickey 
McCalister says. "We have almost 
twice the errors that our opponents 
have. We won't win until we can 
return the serves." 

Looking at the Lady Demon 
schedule, Grambling will visit 
Prather Coliseum Wednesday for a 
7 p.m. match. Then, over the 
weekend, the squad will travel to 
Starkville, Miss, for the Mississippi 
State Invitational, where they will 
face Samford, South Alabama and 
the home team. 



arron: 

eads by 
example 



r ) r ried net, 



AT 



75 



Continued from p. 6 

"As far as playing the run, 

Indre's the best I've ever coached," 

laid Goodwin. "Sometimes in pass 

coverage, he gets caught up or takes 

play fake , but as far as pi aying the 

run, he's the best." 

To watch Carron on Saturdays is 

watch a man consumed with the 

riolent aspect of the game. Locking 

>nto the ball, exploding to the runner 

"id eradicating him with the 

fexterity of a cruise missile wiping 

">t a chemical factory is vintage 

foron. He can be a dominating, 

'De-man show on the field, but off of 

\ he is a soft-spoken personality 

ho is quick to deflect the credit. 

Hike to see the whole defense do 

* e 'l," says Carron. "It's not like it's 

^dre Carron trying to get the 

^Ue, it's all of us. I couldn't do it 

^hout them. 

"We've got some good players. 

'his defense, we've got a great 

k'ationship. It doesn't matter who 

fete the pub, as long as we get the 
tin." 

fc Ifyou want to see Carron play on 
jWurdays, you better see him play 
year. Chances are he will be 
*orking on Sundays come next 
-H"*ason. 



Read 




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Page 8 



September 17, 1 




YEAR of DECISION 



Sep 



SENATOR - AT - LARGE: Vote for 5 




Kathy 
Allen 

Senator-at-Large 

"I feel that the 
Student Government 
Association should be 
the "backbone" of the 
activities of Northwest- 
ern students. Many of 
you don't even know 
what the purpose of . 
SGA is. I'd like to 
change that. As a 
Senator-at-I.*rge, I will 
strive to better involve 
your interests in the 
discussions of the SGA. 

I feel that I am 
qualified to represent 
you as Senator-at- 
Large because I am 
involved in many area 
on campus K so I can 
relate to your interests 
and needs. I am willing 
to work both for you 
and with you, so that, 
working together, we 
can make Northwest- 
ern the best it can be." 




Jennifer 
Berry 

Senator-at-Large 



"Hello, my name is 
Jennifer Berry. I am 
currently a sophomore at 
Northwestern State 
University, running for 
Senator-at-Large. 
Through my involvement 
in many clubs in high 
school and Presidential 
Leadership at NSU, I 
have the experience 
needed to properly fill 
this position. 

Due to the fact that 
I have been at NSU for 
one year, I am aware of 
the wants and needs of 
the students So when 
you go to the polls 
remember ai>d vote for 
me ... Jennifer Berry for 
Senator-at-Large." 




Oscar 
George 

Senator-at-Large 

"For the past two 
years, I have had the 
pleasure of serving you 
as your SGA Senator-at- 
Large. During those two 
years, I have voiced the 
opinions of many who 
have gone unheard. 

Once again, I seek 
your support as I enter 
into the race for Senator- 
at Large." 






Robin 
Hemperley 

Senator-at-Large 



"Hi! My name is 
Robin Hemperley and I 
would appreciate your 
vote. I feel that as 
Senator-at-Large I 
would serve you well. 
O.K. you say, Why 
should I vote for her? I 
think you should elect 
me because I will always 
be willing to listen to 
what you have to say. I 
understand the way 
Student Government 
works — and I want to 
make it work for you — 
the students. So please 
vote for me, Robin 
Hemperley for Senator- 
at-Large." 



Kip 

Patrick 

Senator-at-Large 

"My name is Kip 
Patrick and I would like 
to become Senator-at- 
Large here at North- 
western. There are very 
few improvements that 
can be made here at 
NSU, but the matters 
that need reform are 
what we are concerned 
the most about. 

Show some concern 
and come and vote." 



Nicole 
Rice 

Senator-at-Large 



"Hello! My name is 
Nicole Rice, a candidate 
for SGA Senator-at- 
Large. As a sophomore, 
I am aware of the many 
problems college 
students face. If elected, 
I will work hard to serve 
as a liaison between you, 
the students, and the 
administration of 
Northwestern. 

I will put forth 
every effort to insure 
that students have a 
voice in the Student 
Government Association. 

When you go to the 
polls, please consider me 
for Senator-at-Large. 
Together, we can make 
Northwestern a place 
where students truly 
come first." 




Jenna 
Robb 

Senator-at-Large 



"Greetings fellow 
Demons. My name is 
Jenna Robb and I am 
running for Senator-at- 
Large. It would be an 
honor for me to repre- 
sent you, the students of 
Northwestern, on the 
Student Government 
Association. 

If elected to the 
office of Senator-at- 
Large I plan to work 
diligently to promote 
student interests. I am 
aware of existing 
problems on campus and 
am eager to assist in 
solving them. I feel I am 
qualified for this office 
because I know what is 
expected of me, I am 
prepared to do the job, 
and I am ready to get 
things done!" 



Tara L. 
Sharp 

Senator-at-Large 



"You're probably 
wondering why you 
should vote for me? — 
Because I believe 
cooperation between 
students and faculty is 
the key. 

ITl try to represent 
all the students, not just 
one, HI listen to your 
ideas and get the job 
done. 

I'm not just making 
empty promises like all 
the rest, I just want to 
hive this job my best. 

Vote for Tara Sharp 
on election day, Senator- 
at-Large — all the way!" 




Leslie 
S tarns 

Senator-at-Lcu 



"Hi everybody! 
name is Leslie Stan 
and I am running fg 
the position of Senaj 
at-large. 

Although this ii 
my first semester at 
NSU, I know howot 
campus governing 
bodies are set up. It 
may seem that at a 
school of this size th 
students would hep 
first; but, that is not 
always the case. Aj 
Senator-at- Large, I 
will strive to consols 
date the diverse 
opinions of the studi 
body. I want everyi 
to realize that wen 
tile life-line of this 
university and our 
opinions should be 
placed above all othi 

So make the wi 
decision and vote: 
Leslie Stains for 
Senator-at-Large. 1 



f Phi Be 
f Sports 
f ROTC 

r ausa 

f Residei 



HOMECOMING COURT 



Vote 
for 
10 










Monica Billiot Tammy Clary Henrietta Collins Eve Cox Terri Crumpton Michelle Genre Beth Gowland Cathy Huey Carmen John 









Ayesha Kennedy Anjanette Lee Kim McKinney Ginny Mix Trade Najolia Andree Rizzo Nicki Rothschild Gwen Rutkowski Leslie Stevens Nicole Tujaq 



JUNIOR SENATOR: Vote for 2 



FRESHMAN SENATOR: Vote for 2 






Ted 

Methvin 

Junior Senator 

"Hello, my name is 
Ted Methvin. 1 am 
from Ualhart, Texas 
and major in 
Business 

Administration. 1 am 
campaigning for one 
of the two junior 
senator positions. I 
previously attended 
Emporia State 
University in Kansas, 
where I served as a 
senator for two 
semesters. I am 
looking forward to 
applying the 
experience gained at 
ESU to the obstacles 
present on our 
campus." 



Michelle 
IV! u I key 

Junior Senator 

" Hi, my name is 
Michelle Mulkey and 
I have chosen to be a 
candidate for junior 
senator. I feel that 
there is a need for a 
strong student 
government which 
will be in touch with 
the entire student 
body and I would like 
to be part of it. I will 
do my best to listen 
for ideas as well as 
complaints of those 
students who wish to 
be heard. My 
experience includes 
secretary of the 
Rowing Team, 
president of the 
Council of Ye Revels, 
and commander of 
Scotchguard as well 
as membership in 
ROTC and Circle K 
International. 

I ask for your 
support in helping me 
achieve this goal." 



Jacques 
Vilar 

Junior Senator 

"Our commun- 
ication between the 
student body and the 
senate has been 
hindered in the past. 
I plan to end that. 

Hello, my name is 
Jacques Vilar and I 
want to be your next 
junior senator. 

I plan to let the 
students know what 
the senate is deciding 
for their future. 

Communication is 
the key to a successful 
administration. 

Please cast your 
ballot for Jacques 
Vilar." 





Philip 
Wolfe 

Junior Senator 

"The ad- 
ministration has 
forgotten the 
concerns of the older 
students. Non- 
traditional students 
have been 
completely ignored. 
Juniors are losing 
their student-worker 
jobs because the 
administration feels 
that even though 
they have done 
nothing wrong the 
freshmen should 
have these jobs. The 
junior class needs 
representation on 
these and several 
other important 
issues. Vote Philip 
Wolfe for junior class 
senator." 



Shelly 
Abbiatti 

Freshman 
Senator 

"The sun is setting 
and a bold American 
eagle transverses the 
orange and red water- 
painted sky. Follow 
the eagle, watch as it 
soars with sunrise 
and sunset as its only 
boundaries. Night 
falls, and obstacles 
are thrown in its way, 
but with goal in sight 
continues to pursue it. 

I am that eagle. I 
was challenged to 
serve as Louisiana 
Girls' State Governor 
1990 and I met the 
challenge, 1 served on 
Student Government 
Association for four 
years in high school, 
as well as a class 
officer. 

Let's push back 
the boundaries and 
throw away the 
obstacles, for 
Northwestern State 
University is only 
what we make it." 




Bobby 
George 

Freshman 
Senator 



"My name is 
Bobby George and I 
am asking for your 
vote to hold a seat as 
freshman senator on 
*our' Student 
Government 
Association. As a 
freshman, I have 
witnessed progress on 
our campus. I have 
also spotted problems 
and I have the 
confidence in myself 
and the SGA that we 
can find the solutions. 
I ask for your 
consideration, your 
vote, and hopefully 
your ideas in the 
future for a better 
NSU. I am asking 
you to let me be your 
voice." 




Kathy 
King 

Freshman 
Senator 

"Hello, my name is 
Kathy King and I 
would like to serve on 
SGA as freshman 
senator because I 
have always enjoyed 
being involved in 
student government. 
From working on the 
executive student 
council in high school, 
I know the 

importance of student 
activities. I feel my 
experiences from 
executive council 
qualify me for 
freshman senator on 
the Student 
Government 
Association and I 
know I can get the job 
done right. I want to 
make the 1991-92 
year as exciting as 
possible. So, when 
you vote remember 
mo Kathy King, 
candidate for 
freshman senator." 



Melissa 
Mabou 

Freshman 
Senator 

"Hello, my name is 
Melissa Mabou and I 
would like to 
represent you in the 
position of freshman 
senator. The 
following activities 
that 1 have been 
involved with have 
helped me gain the 
knowledge I would 
need to fulfill my 
obligations this 
position would 
require. In high 
school I participated 
in student council, I 
was president of 
BETA club, captain of 
the cheerleading 
squad, was treasurer 
of SADD. I was also 
chosen for Girls' State 
and gained much 
knowledge of 
government there. 
Please consider me for 
this position. Your 
vote will be greatly 
appreciated." 



Jill 

Parker 

Freshman 
Senator 



"I would like to 
introduce myself. My 
name is Jill Parker, 
I'm running for SGA 
freshman senator. I 
am a new -comer to 
Natchitoches and 
Northwestern. I am 
from Shreveport. I 
graduated from Byrd 
High School in May of 
1991. I am so excited 
about getting involved 
with what goes on at 
Northwestern, and 
getting to know 
everybody. I have 
already met so many 
people with so many 
different walks of life. 
I am looking forward 
to working with each 
and every one of you. 
I will work very hard 
for Northwestern and 
you. Please vote Jill 
Parker for freshman 
senator." 



Shana 
Tietjen 

Freshman 
Senator 

"Hello, my na* 
Shana Tietjen aa» 
would like to 
represent you as f 
freshman senate"; 
feel I am qualify 1 
this position bec'f 
have held stated 
positions in the 
Louisiana Junior 
Quarter Horse 
Association and 
understand the 



responsibilities 



tt- 



this position call 8 
As your freshm*" 
senator, I will be 
accessible to y" u 
will try to perfor"' 
duties to the bes'* 1 
my ability." 



Sep 



tember 17, 1991 



Page 9 



er 17, 1 




YEAR of DECISION 



MISS NSU: Vote for 1 



ELECTION INFORMATION 





•lie 
irns 



i 



thelma 
Clay 



f phi Beta Lambda 
f Sports Ambassador 
fBOTC 

f ausa 

f Resident Assistant 



Linda 
Davis 



itor-at-Lari 

Hi everybody 
is Leslie Stan 
am running fq 
>sition of Sent 
ge- 

Although this 
■at semester at 
I know how* 
us governing 
3 are set up. It 
leem that at a 
1 of this size th 
nts would be a 
but, that is not 
's the case. Aj 
»r-at- Large, I 
trive to consob' 
;he diverse 
>ns of the stud 
I want everyo 
ilize that weal 
fe-line ofthii 
rsity and our 
ma should be 
d above all ofh| 
So make the w 
ion and vote: 
; Starns for 
tor-at-Large* 




T Student Activities 
Board 

President 

Secretary /Treasurer 
Directors Award 
NACA Delegate 
Summer Council 
Representative-at- 

Large Chairman 
Thanksgiving Food 

Drive Chairman 
Campus Survey 

Coordinator 
Special Events 

Committee 

▼ Phi Mu Sorority 

Scholarship 
Chairman 

Recording Secretary 
Historian 
Intramurals 
Spirit Committee 

▼ NSU Yell Leaders 

▼ Resident Assistant 
T Rho Chi 

T Homecoming Queen 

▼ Freshman Connector 

▼ Committee on 
Organizations 

▼ Gavel Club 

T Students Come First 
Roundtable 

▼ Ninth Wave 

T Louisiana Association 
of Educators 

▼ VIP Box Hostess 

T Admissions Recruiting 
Hostess 

▼ Fun & Fitness Sports 
Camp Staff 




Beth 
Gowland 



▼ Student Government 
Association 

Vice-President 
Commissioner of 

Elections 
Senator-at-Large 
COSGA Delegate 
Senator of the month 
Memorial Committee 
Traffic Appeals Board 
Constitution 

Revisions Committee 
Homecoming 

Committee 
Student Services 

Committee 

▼ Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Sorority 

Parliamentarian 
Efficiency Chairman 
Pledge Review Board 
Spirit Committee 
Public Relations 

Committee 
Intramurals 

▼ Freshman Connector 
T Peer Leaders 

Coalition 
Drug Free Camp 
Counselor 

▼ BACCHUS 

▼ Hall Assistant 



Elizabeth 
McDavid Harris 

▼ Current Sauce 
Managing Editor 
Copy Editor 
Staff Writer 

T Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Sorority 

Education Director 
Triangle 

Correspondent 
Education committee 
Sweetheart Dance 

committee 
Public Relations 

committee 
Junior Scholastic 
Award 
T Society of Professional 
Journalists 
Secretary 

▼ Purple Jackets 

▼ Dean's List 

▼ Student Government 
Association Media 
Board 

▼ Louisiana Scholars' 
College 

Shreveport Times 

intern 
Houston Chronicle 

intern 




Josie 
Venable 



T Alpha Lambda Delta 
Sorority 

▼ Baptist Student 
Union 

Missions Education 

Chairman 
Inner Peace Music 

Ensemble 
Summer Missionary 

to Hong Kong 

▼ Outstanding Student 
Employee, Watson 
Library 

▼ Student Activities 
Board 

▼ Student Nurses' 
Association 




SGA Elections 
for Senators, 
Homecoming Court 
Members and Miss NSU 



Wednesday, September 18 
Student Union 

Thursday, September 19 
Iberville 

Runoff Election: September 25, 26 



Elected by Acclamation 



Amy Barnette 
Jamie Lang 
Sophomore Senators 



Bobby Gunn 
Ray Krull 

Senior Senators 



Blake Rougeau 
Graduate Senator 



VOTE 



"**** 

RIP-ROARING." 

— fan traxiHU ISHMiA/IM 

Oscar nominations!!! 

Mel Gibson is thrilling 
and exciting. 
Brilliantly directed!' 



"A triumph!" 

Djikt !*jifKkN.-irnv1SUttlW 

HAMLET 



® ® 




TONIGHT 
IN 

THE ALLEY 
7:00 PM. 



iana 
etjen 

ashman 
tator 

•Hello, my na* 
jia Tietjen aS» 
tld like to 
resent you as 1 
hman senator 
I am qualifi*" 
i position bee*" 
e held state** 
itions in the 
isiana Junior 
irter Horse 
ociation and 
lerstand the 
sonsibilities & 
i position call 8 
your freshm** 
ator, I will b« 
;ssibletoyO» ,, 
I try to pei-for" 1 
ies to the be*' 
ability." 




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the corner, here are a few reminders from 
your friends at Trans La on the safe and 
responsible use of natural gas where 
you live. 



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annual check-up. 

Your natural gas furnace has been 
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that's been idle a while, your furnace 
needs' a checkup before it starts back to 
work. You may want to check with your 
landlord or apartment manager about 
arranging for an annual inspection by a 
qualified professional heating contractor. 
Once it's been inspected, your furnace 
should require very little attention the 
rest of the winter. 
A closet isn't always a closet. 

Your water heater or furnace is 
probably in a closet all by itself And 
that's the way it should stay. As tempting 
as it may be, don't use the space around a 
water heater or furnace for storage. Even 



if these major appliances sit in the open, 
the space around them should be kept 
clear to insure adequate air circulation. 

If you smell gas. 

We hope that you will never have 
to deal with a gas leak. If you do smell 
gas, day or night, exit the building 
immediately then call your local Trans La 
office. Do not flip light switches or use 
any other electrical equipment Do not. 
light a match or a candle. Do not try to 
find the leak yourself 

For more information. 
Get a free folder from your landlord or 
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We're proud to be your gas company 



Page 10 



EDITORIAL 



EDITORIAL 



Play Oh! 



"Play Oh! Lot'ry's come and we gonna win some." 

That is what the popular commercial airing on 
television says about the Louisiana Lottery, but who is 
really going to win in Louisiana? 

Louisiana does not have a very good record with 
lotteries. The state's previous experiment with the 
lottery ended after 27 years in 1895. After its scandal- 
riddled run here, no state ran a lottery until New 
Hampshire revived it in 1963. 

Many feel the lottery can't be run honestly in 
Louisiana and never will be. But Michael Carr, 
president of the Louisiana Lottery, believes the job can 
be done. He is former director of the Michigan Lottery. 
He has experience and he knows what must be done. 
His number one challenge is to run a fair game. 

It can be done. It has been done in 34 other states 
including the District of Columbia. Why won't it work 
here? 

Simply. The money expected to be received from 
lottery sales is a rather large amount. In Louisiana, 
lots of money means lots of greed and corruption. 

With an expected $300 million worth of ticket sales 
for the first year, the state plans to get 35 percent of the 
money. Where does it go? Where does the other 65 
percent go? 

Already the system is being tested. The money, 
which is was once said would be dedicated entirely to 
education, is now going before the Louisiana 
legislature to determine its final destination. 

Don't be surprised if our legislators give 
themselves a hefty pay raise with the lottery revenues. 

Louisiana can't overlook education. It is the key. It 
is one of the most important reasons 70 percent of the 
people voted for the lottery. We were promised a better 
education system funded by the income of the lottery. 
But now the legislature has set aside total allotment to 
the education system, and is going to vote on the exact 
recipients of the monies. Education has once again 
been put on the back burner for pay raises and 
corruption. 

The state is back to square one; waiting to see 
where our legislature is going to put our money. No 
wonder 58 percent of the Louisiana people don't believe 
the state can run an honest game. 

Despite the distrust caused by a history of 
corruption, Louisiana lottery fans are ready to play. 
The lines were long on opening day. 

To quote a man overheard after buying a lottery 
ticket, "I struck it poor." And so seems the Louisiana 
education system. 

But there is the ever popular saying in lotteries, 
"Somebody's got to win." 

Who? Education or corruption? 



Current Sauce Editorial Policy 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to P.O. Box 5630, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497 or brought by the Office of Student 
Publications in 225 Kyser Hall. 

Letters to the editor must include ihe author's classification and 
hometown, as well as a telephone number where the writer can be reached. 
No anonymous letters will be printed. The Current Sauce reserves the 
right to edit all correspondence. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discreation of the editor. 



September 17, 



^pteniber 1' 



fill Current Sauce 




Eric Dutile 


Van Rodney Reed 


Tina Foret 
Leigh Flvnn 




Maria Jones 


Elizabeth Mu>avid Harris 

Managing Editor 


Jason Oldham 
Ashlev Peterson 


Paul Parker 


Michelle Gt\re 


Paul Pickering 
Mary Porth 


News Editor 


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Sports Editor 


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Artist 


Lifestyle Editor 


Eben Cook 


Chris Need ham 


Todd Martin 


Advertising 
Tom Whitehead 


Business Manager 


Adviser 



Billy Bob Wins the Lottery 



guest Cok 

yiessc 
5GA] 

j t ' s that time of yi 
in school, losin 
f you who had thi 
Lgtfirst series of te 
didn't even wi 




roes- 



totakebecau 
You also can 
MCSt and those o 
Ijnd 20 minutes I 
jljhe parking lot a 
congestion. 

go, you ask.wha 
e 8 bout parking? 
^ ot sure. Then 

t \ot\g- term P lan P 
^ parking lot, m 
jethat happen, ho 
•now, things like sp 
^ nanew parking 1 
fcg far as a shor 
w most practical 
grkatthecoliseun 
, e coliseum to the 
, approximately 3. 
ra lk isn't too bad 
flowing, and the 
>hind the clouds. 
00 degrees or n 
imagine that), 
buttle service co 
1, e se are all mayl 
iow you know wha 
|o regarding the pt 

As far as registi 
hey will be dealt 
heentire school cai 
one phone service; 
elephone registra 
hat will take d 
^ministration. 



For the Re cord 

Paul Pickering 



Blame the parking problem one 
on the students 



It seems that parking has 
become quite an issue here at 
Northwestern this semester. We 
hesitate to call it a problem, because 
I believe that it is, in fact, just a 
symptom. The real problem is so 
obvious, and the solution so clear, 
that we are amazed no one has 
mentioned it. The problem is not a 
lack of parking, but an abundance 
of spoiled, lazy students. 

Students here at Northwestern 
seem to prefer faculty spaces to 
student spaces. I often ride to school 
with my mother, who is a professor 
here, and I always notice an 
amazing thing: all of the faculty 
spaces are full, but very few of the 
cars in them have faculty/staff 
stickers. 

These spaces are taken by 
students who would like to avoid 
the gruelingfive-minute walk from 
the dorms or the student lots. In 
most cases, I would guess these 
students are in desperate need of 
extra sleep and need to park as 
close as possible to avoid being 
late. Put more simply, they are 
just lazy. As one professor told me, 
"Maybe they would like to have 
escalators as well!" 

The simplest answer to this 
problem would seem to be having 
the campus police issue heavy fines 



to these offenders and/or tow their 
cars. The $5 parking fine imposed 
on violators is not working. In the 
words of a fellow student, "It's not 
illegal parking, it's $5 parking." 

I don't see many cars with tickets 
on them, so I guess the police don't 
nail each and every offender. Let's 
say that a student might collect a 
total of $100 in fines per semester. 
They might just view this as part of 



parking at the stadium and the 
coliseum. Granted, most of us would 
rather not walk from there, but 
that's our own fault, not the school's . 
Here's food for thought. My 
girlfriend used to go to Baylor 
University in Texas, and she told 
me that there is no student parking 
within the campus proper. Only 
faculty may park on the interior 
lots. All students are forced to park 



The se spaces are taken by students who would 
like to avoid the grueling five-minute walk 
from the dorms or the student lots. 



the cost of attending school. In 
many cases parents, not students, 
pay anyway. If these cars were 
routinely towed, however, I doubt 
you would see many student cars in 
faculty spaces. Another possibility 
would be to raise fines to something 
like, oh, maybe $50. I don't think 
many kids, or their parents, would 
laugh at that. 

Even without faculty spaces, 
students have plenty of places to 
park. As the administration 
repeatedly reminds us, there is 



somewhere on the perimeter, which 
is far away indeed, and then walk to 
class. I've known students here 
who would drive from Kyser to 
Bienville between classes. Dr. Coats 
has informed me that at Florida 
State, you are assigned a numbered 
space. If they catch you in the wrong 
one, the police simply put tire locks 
on your car. Now there's an idea. 

So, what's the problem? Well, it 
would be incredibly naive to think 
that this administration would opt 
for such simple solutions. This school 



is governed, as one of my professoi 
points out, by the managerial rula 
of public administration. In o 
words, economics takes priority, 
As NSU's so-called "open dool 
policy" suggests, thil 
administration wants the 
maximum number of studentl 
possible. There is no way thej 
would ever initiate action, such as 
imposing heavy fines or towing 
cars, that would interfere with this 
goal. In fact, the campus police 
were placing notices on illegally 
parked faculty cars (in faculty lots) 
which threatened fines and/or 
towing. This strikes me 
ridiculous when the spaces to which 
the faculty are entitled are filled 
with student cars. You'd think 
that they would at least tow every 
student car in these lots before 
considering action against faculty 
members. 

After all, the only reason the* 
faculty cars are parked illegally •* 
because their spaces are taken bj"j 
student cars. But, as the 
Northwestern motto states, "Al 
NSU, the students come first!" I* 
the sense that the administration 
will succumb to the desires » 
spoiled, lazy students when the 
pocket-book justifies it, this 
absolutely true. 



Readers' Forum 



Guest C< 

Chris Gl< 

Not 



There are sevei 
man must be wa 
fcrindulge wit' 
fcohol you'll end 
with the porcelai 
Wys it's "female," 
,„ to refrain from fu 
And if you decide t 
t j, er camp in the grei 
cognizant of the fi 
borrowing time i 
Mother Nature. 

Most enmping t 
U«6ame. We loac 
with no batteries, 
loomuchinitandi 
Peanut butter 
•andwiches. Afte 
necessities, we a 
hefoun.: :'■ ■ 
'yitable campsi 
•"•Blessly around i 
"ntil you find a s 
"fees your breath 
* anywhere som 
Agoing). Abou 
Participants ore e; 
however, (music, 
lust be construct 
One would th 



Reach out and touch 
someone - like the Sauce 



The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
that this feature could be misused for the sole purpose of causing 
embarrassment and pain to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the feature to degenerate to the 
level of a gossip line nor well we allow it to become a political battle 
ground. Complajnts and criticisms should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibility to hold the line on this matter, and we 
have determined that each call we receive will be formally evaluated 
by an editorial committee composed of the editorial staff. No "one" 
individual will edit the calls. 



We will evaluate the calls for potential to inspire improveme 11 ' 
any given area and then make a decision whether or not to publi^ 
Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an indepen^ 1 
followup on the matter. 

To leave a message, just call our number at 357-5096 betwe^ 
p.m. and 1 2 p.m. on weekdays and leave your name, classified 
major, and a brief message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers who requested 
opportunity to voice comments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers. ^ 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the caret*"' 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



lette r to t 

Melinda ra 

^nior, Natchitc 
People have 
tow up with he£ 
>■ When I visi 
14 the point of 
'""ege I attende 
Curtesy no long 
"k- There hav 
a *are that side\ 
^ess the signs 
^ssed them. 
Mr aight-across; 

Action is reqi 
^over. If this 
^r confused i 

Another ares 
''airway etiquel 

rp designated a 
* could they 
forgivable err 
t . w °U]d hate for 
at I can go do' 
• ' s it a new u 
, lo Wed to talk 
^ly because t 
e trying to list 
Ct 'Wty is int« 
^ersationstl 
Asking tl 
l ated and m> 
business w 
^ 1 can't take 
Sood because 
w Ve - Tlie probl 
But mayl 
j^ently. Rud 



V^ourtesy. 



iber 17, 1 



y 




ptember 17, 1991 



OPINION 



Page 11 



guest Colu mn 

essage from the 
BGA President 



jVJ 



jt'gthattimeofyear.again. We're 
a ck' n school , losing our tans (those 
(you who had them), and taking 
l,jt fir 8 * ser > es of tests in the classes 
oU didn't even want, but had no 
l^jce to take because of registration 
roeS . You also can't find a parking 
-ce, and those of you who can , 
^ n d 20 minutes trying to get out 
f tn e parking lot after class due to 
jafljc congestion. 

go, you ask, what are we going to 
e about parking? Well, right now 
jd n ot sure. There will have to be 
i on g-term plan proposed, build a 
parking lot, maybe. I'd like to 
jethat happen, however, as you all 
paw, things like spending $ 100,000 
i „ a new parking lot takes time. 

' As far as a short-term solution, 
k*^ |g most practical thing will be to 
■T*A grkat the coliseum. The walk from 
be coliseum to the Student Union 
approximately 3.5 minutes. The 
( alk isn't too bad if the wind is 
lowing, and the sun is hidden 
ehind the clouds. But, what if it's 
degrees or raining, or both 
imagine that). That's where a 
huttle service could be offered. 
Iiese are all maybes, but at least 
you know what we're trying to 
|o regarding the parking situation. 

As far as registration problems, 
jiey will be dealt with whenever 
heentire school can be put on touch- 
one phone service; and we can offer 
elephone registration. How long 
hat will take depends on the 
idmi lustration. 



2k 



m 



sts, thif 
wants the 
■ of studenfti 
no way the^ 
iction, suchaJ 
les or towing 
rferewiththil 
.•ampus police 
:s on illegal)! 
in faculty lotM 
fines and/or 
ikes me aj 
paces to whicff 
tied are filled^ 
You'd thinK 
;ast tow eveij 
se lots before 
gainst faculty 



These are some problems facing 
the students now. Are there more? 
The only way I can know your 
problems are if you tell me. If you 
need to talk, come by my office on 
the second floor of the Student 
Union, or call 357-4501. If I can't 
help, well go see Mr. Fulton, Dr. 
Alost or anyone else we need to in 
order to work out the problem. 

We, here at the SGA, have many 
programs and services that we plan 
to offer you this coming year. I don't 
believe in being idle: I believe in 
accelerating forward in order to offer 
beneficial programs and services 
such as the student phone book, 
which will be issued shortly. I don't 
like throwing names around, but 
Brent Cockrell and Stacy Billingsley 
have been working very hard on the 
phonebook. Ifyouseeoneofthem, 
tell them, "Thanks." 

Also, very importantly, go vote 
on Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 
18 and 19. Take an interest and a 
part in choosingyour senators. They 
are representing you! 

In closing, I would like to say 
serving as your president is a great 
experience. I've seen great 
intelligence in some, vast ignorance 
in others and some who are just 
looking for someone to blame. I've 
realized who my real friends are; 
most importantly, who my rainy 
day friends are. To my pleasure, it's 
been great to see all the other 
students who want to work for you. 
Thanks for opening my eyes to these 
things. 



Guest Column 

Paul Parker 



Tennis world good topic 
for an award-winning book 



One of the biggest stories of 
late in the world of sports involves 
Jimmy Connors and his play at 
the U.S. Open. The chances of a 
39-year-old tennis player being 
able to compete with players hall' 
his age are slim, at best. Stories 
like this will usually catch my 
attention. This one even made me 
start thinking about tennis. 

To be perfectly honest, I know 
just the basics of tennis. I am sure 
most people would agree that it's 
time to have some kind of guide in 
print to help those of us unfamiliar 
with the sport in understanding 
one of the world's fastest growing 
crazes. 

I'm going to take a chance. To 
get the ball rolling I'm currently 
writing my first book. Although it 
may not make any sense to write a 
book on a subject I know very little 
about, I think the old supply and 
demand theories are in my favor 
here. For now, only the very 
important stuff should be 
mentioned. This is what I have 
gathered so far. 

Let's start things off with 
Martina Navratilova. She's the 
woman tennis player who looks 



like Tom Petty on steroids. She is 
still a pretty good player, but if you 
ask me she is near the down side of 
a career. I'm hoping she doesn't 
read this. It would be embarrassing 
to receive a severe butt-kicking for a 
Tom Petty joke. 

Before Martina there was Chris 



problems and diminishing careers. 
McEnroe's career died about the 
same time the wooden racket did. 

One player with a career on the 
rise is Steffi Graf. She is one of a few 
young ladies taking over the tennis 
world, not the beauty pageant world. 

Monica Seles is another member 



My theory is that he's the Milli Vanilli 
of the tennis world. He's only there 



for commercials. 



Evert. The only thing you need to 
know about her is the product she 
endorsed. Both her and "Dandy" 
Don Meredith sold iced tea — 
definitely a sign of talent. 

Next is Jimmy Connors. He is 
kind of old but that didn't stop him 
from surprising everyone at the U.S. 
Open with his strc ng showing. As 
much as I like Connors, however, 
I'm not expecting a repeat 
performance. 

If you mention Jimmy Connors, 
then John McEnroe deserves equal 
time. Both have slight temper 



of tennis' youth movement but still 
nothing to write home about. 

Jennifer Capriati shows signs of 
breaking the ugly-young-ladies- 
play-tennis trend starting. 
Unfortunately, she is approximately 
9 years old. Also, like, she is almost, 
like, impossible, like, to quote. 

On to Ivan Lend! . For a while he 
dominated men's tennis. As of late, 
he seems to be losing his touch. This 
is understandable, especially if you 
have ever tried to play with one of 
those French foreign legion hats on 
like the one Lendl wears. He also 



usually has this confused look on 
his face. That probably doesn't 
help. 

Another name to know in men's 
tennis is Boris Becker. Becker's 
name is like that vocabulary word 
youll never use except on the 
actual test. Whenever Wimbledon 
rolls around it's time to relearn 
that name. For the most part I 
wouldn't worry about Becker 
winning anything else that 
matters. 

Wimbledon. See Boris Becker. 
This tournament is played on 
grass. I can't even bounce a 
basketball on grass, much less play 
tennis. All the players are required 
to wear white. Other colors are 
against the rules. How can 
anybody call Louisiana strange? 

Did somebody say strange? 
How about Andre Agassi? I am 
going to take a chance and put 
him in the book. I'm not sure he 
actually plays tennis. My theory 
is that he's the Milli Vanilli of the 
tennis world. He's only there for 
commercials. 

Well, that is enough for now. If 
you'd like more, actually buying 
the book is the only way to go. 



Guest Column 

Chris Gleason 



Nothing like being 
one with nature 



There are several things in life 
man must be wary about. If you 
fcrindulge with mixtures of 
tfcohol you'll end up one-on-one 
with the porcelain god. If a girl 
wys it's "female," it would be wise 
f my professorl Strain from further comment. 

And if yon decide to rough it" and 
ition. In otheJ *"P in ' hp g ,eat outdoors, be 
;akes priority. 'P'izant of the fact that you are 
d "open doi ""Wing time and space from 
Mother Nature. 

Most camping trips start about 
the same. We load up a flashlight 
*ith no batteries, a cooler with far 
too much in it. and several hundred 
Peanut butter and jelly 
•wdwiches. Aftor racking these 
necessities, we are ready to go. 
I found the best way to find a 
•stable campsite i- tt> tuixe 
"•nlessly around in the wilderness 
""til you find a spot so scenic it 
kkes your breathe away (defined 
•8an)t. ! ■ ^nineone else had a 
" re going). About this time most 
Participants are eager and excited; 
°° ff ever, (music, please) the tent 
•«st be constructed. 

One would think that several 



t reason these 
led illegally i> 
> are taken bi 
Jut, as tM 
o states, *&) 
ome first!" 
jministratio" 
le desires • 
its when th* 
;s it, this i» 



Tiprovemen'J 
at to publis 11 
an indepen** 

096 betwe<* 
classified 

j j 

} requester 
■eaders. ^ 



college-educated people could 
master an $ 1 8 Wal-Mart tent within 
an hour or two. Wrong. Sinners 
should serve penance by putting up 
tents. Who designs these things? 
Anyway, after many attempts we 
usually get the tent to look like a 
beached whale, which is perfectly 
acceptable. Next comes the 
obligatory fire. 

All people think they are great 
at starting fires. This is an odd 
reflection on the human mind, but 
nevertheless true. When collecting 
firewood it is wise to remember that 
Mother Nature is always in control. 
So you foolhardy people who think 
you can wander around tearing 
down and burning all the small trees 
you find have another thing coming. 
Mother Nature's defense system is 
much too intricate. Keeping a fire 
going is a full-time chore, especially 
since most people aren't happy 
unless the fire is voluminous enough 
for Smokey the Bear and Woodsy 
the Owl to complain about. 

To make a long story short, 
there's nothing quite like being one- 
on-one with nature. Once the fire is 



going, and the standard small-town 
sized blanket is spread out on the 
forest floor, free thought is a given. 

Sprawled out on a blanket 
gazing at the heavens and 
pondering life with people you love 
surrounding you is quite soothing. 
The infinite black sky, dotted with 
a myriad of brilliant stars, leaves 
nothing to be desired. You seem 
insignificant, and as well you 
should. Love and peace are rare 
commodities in our current world, 
take advantage when you can. 

Respect Mother Nature, and 
shell respect you. Sure, there are 
inconveniences with camping, but 
the rewards far outweigh the 
difficulties. Laying on your back, 
iace-to-face with God, one discovers 
many things about their nature. I 
discovered, after some debate, that 
I loved every aspect of my life and 
would quit taking it for granted. I 
also gain more respect for Mother 
Nature every time I visit her. It is 
sad though that some people feel 
obliged to dirty her up in so many 
ways. Oh well, what you give is 
what you get. 



The Sauce Poll 



Vote in The Sauce Poll 



Every other week we will feature 
The Sauce Poll where we ask you a 
question much like this week's 
question on the parking issue. The 
results will allow us the chance to see 
how the students of Northwestern 
stand on an issue. 

The poll will be conducted each 



weekday. An answering machine Monday thru Friday between 6 p.m. 
will answer your phone calls and and 12 a.m. 

record your vote of "Yes" or "No." This is your forum. By voting, 
You will not have to leave your name, you give us the chance to better serve 

Feel free to tell us more than just you. 
"Yes" or "No." Tell us why you feel 
the way you do. 

The number to call is 357-5096 



The Sauce Poll 



A bi-weekly forum on issues that affect Northwestern State University 

SHOULD THE MONEY RAISED BY 
THE LOTTERY BE DEDICATED 
ENTIRELY TO EDUCATION? 



YES 




NO 



The Sauce Poll is not scientific but does serve as an informal gauge of the intensity of feelings on an issue. 



letter t o the Editor 

•BELINDA RATH BURN WITT 
^nior, Natchitoches 

People have asked me why I came to NSU. I 
up with hearing about what a fine college this 
*as. When I visited I found this to be true. So what 
18 the point of this letter? The quiet southern 
'""ege I attended is no longer that way. Common 
Curtesy no longer seems to be a part of every day 
^ There have been a few changes. I wasn't 
a *are that sidewalks were designated one way. I 
^ss the signs haven't been posted or I've just 
Jessed them. If three people walking abreast 
'traight-across) the person walkingin the opposite 
re ction is required to step into the grass or get 
over. If this is indeed true, please let me and 
n? r confused individuals know. 
Another area that I need clarification on is 
^way etiquette. Are there certain stairs that 
/^designated as up and down at specific times? If 
c °uld they be posted so I don't make the 
puorgivable error of going in the wrong direction. 
*°uld hate for someone to have to move aside so 
™' I can go down the stairs. 

k it a new university policy that students are 
I °*ed to talk during lectures? I use the term 
ecause those of us who are indeed students 
^ trying to listen and take notes. This studious 
l 'vity is interrupted by bits and pieces of 



y ersations that float down around me and like 
Asking them to be quiet only gets them 



the carets 



"He 

J^tated and myself aggravated. I am minding my 
9hH ,)usiness when you are running your mouth, 
„ d 1 can't take notes. Asking the instructor does 
^ S°od because that person ask if you want to 
^°Ve. The problem is the same wherever I go in the 



. f. 6r ently. Rudeness has become the replacement 
V courtesy. 



0tn - But maybe I'm the one who is seeing things 










Our dedication to see to 
it that Northwestern 
Sports is covered 
completely has led us to 

create 



SUP 

SPORTS 





- This Fall in the - 

Current Sauce 



Page 12 



LIFESTYLE 



Kentucky Headhunters to play Northwest 



One of the most unique acts in 
country music, The Kentucky 
i Ladhunters, will appear in concert 
atNorthwesternat8p.m.onOct. 18 
in Prather Coliseum as part of 
Homecoming *91. 

The concert is sponsored by the 
Northwestern Student Activities 
Board. 

Ticket prices are $7 for 
Northwestern students and 
employees. There is a limit of two 
tickets per person at $7. General 
admission tickets are $12 and $15 
the day of the show. Area ticket 
outlets will be announced soon. 

The Headhunters blew into the 
country music scene with their first 
album, Pickin' On Nashville, a self- 
produced album cut during a 
$45,000 recording session. 

Pickin' On Nashville was an 
immediate success with one critic 
calling it "honest-to-God-biscuits- 



and-gravy rock 'n' i oil." The album 
sold 500,000 copies faster than any 
other debut album by a group in the 
history of country music. 

After reaching platinum in just 
50 weeks, the album is nearing 
double-platinum in both the United 
States and Canada. 

Quick success came to the group 
that went from playing 300-seat 
clubs to opening for Hank Williams 
Jr. in 20,000-seat arenas in six 
months. They won the "Top New 
Group Award" from the Academy of 
Country Music in 1990. Last 
October, they won three Country 
Music Association awards including 
Vocal Group of the Year, Producers 
of the Year and Album of the Year. 

Their second album, Electric 
Barnyard, has sold over half a 
million copies. 

The band consists of brothers 
Richard and Fred Young and cousin 



Greg Martin, who have played 
together since the 1960s, and 
brothers Doug and Ricky Lee Phelps. 

The Youngs and Martin played 
together for 20 years without getting 
a record deal. The three teamed up 
with the Phelps brothers to form 
the Kentucky Headhunters in 1986. 

Part of the group's appeal may be 
in the diversity of its music. The 
Headhunters' music shows the 
influence of psychedelic, jazz, rock, 
blues and bluegrass music. 

Another part of their appeal may 
be their "look." 

"I'm sure our look has hurt us," 
said Richard Young. "We might have 
been male models if we didn't look 
the way we did. But I think people 
are looking more from the heart. I 
don't think people are spending their 
time on first impressions. I think 
that's good. I'm not gonna be able to 
walk in looking the way I do and get 
a job on Wall Street." 





Charmine Neville will present her own style of jaz 
on Wednesday, Sept. 25 in The Alley. 



The Kentucky Headhunters are, from left, Richard Young, Doug Phelps, 
Fred Young, Ricky Phelps and Greg Martin. 



r 



Time, Love 
and 

Tenderness 



. . .for the grounds ' crew. 



that's an everyday affair. 



By LEONARD A. WILLIAMS 

Lifestyle Editor 

Watering the yard and mowing 
the grass takes on a whole new 
meaning when a grounds' crew takes 
on more than 200 acres. 

Planting 300 azaleas and 
hundreds of feet of grass is a hefty 
job indeed, but for Ellen Dollar and 
the entire Northwestern grounds' 
crew, caring for the land just takes 
time, love and tenderness. 

Dollar is the figure that students 
at Northwestern have probably seen 
around campus, either pruning a 
few flower beds at Russell Hall or 
pulling weeds in front of the Student 
Union. A graduate of Northwestern, 
Dollar has worked for the crew for 
over a year now, including her 
position as a student worker while 
she attended the university. 

"I like what I do. I would rather 
just raise baby plants and trees, but 
I enjoy working all over campus, 
too," said Dollar. 



Ellen Dollar, pictured left and below, is a member of the Northwestern 
grounds' crew. She, along with the other employees, spends her time keeping 
the campus clean and beautiful. She tends the flowers, keeping them as healthy 
and colorful as she can. She says that she loves her work with the land. 




For now, the crew is mainly 
concentrating its efforts on 
completing the Alumni Walk near 
the Columns, said Dollar. The 
Alumni Walk is near its finished 
stage, said Dollar. The crew and 
student workers are striving to 
finish much of the landscaping by 
the end of the fall semester. 

However, there are many places 
that the grounds' crew attends to on 
a daily basis. 

"If it wasn't for those guys you 
see tooling around in the riding 
mowers, I wouldn't have a flower 
bed to plant in," Dollar said. 

"I'm a lot more visible because 
people see flowers and they like 
flowers, but the guys who actually 
mow the campus should get the 
credit." 

Unfortunately, Dollar said, the 
crew spends too much time picking 
up trash around campus. 
"We spend two or three hours a 



day just picking up trash," she said. 

In a letter to the Current Sauce 
last year, she tried to make students 
more aware of the job that the crew 
is doing and encouraged students' to 

be more considerate, especially 
when throwing away garbage. 

The entire campus beautification 
program is a year-long process with 
fall, winter and summer planting. 
Different seasons require different 
planting techniques. 

"In a few weeks all these flowers 
[the roses at the front gate] will 
probably be somewhere else," said 
Dollar. 

Dr. Robert Alost, president of 
Northwestern, has placed an 
emphasis on making the campus 
look a lot better. His main objective, 
according to Dollar, is to complete a 
major portion of the Alumni Walk 
by Homecoming. 

"It keeps me busy, but it's part of 
the job," she said. 




it ' % fy ' V 






17, iCZ 



i^gpER Sports 



jfjTEP Blitz Stymies Demons 
%i 14-0 shutout, page 8 





Lifestyles 

Watching The Stars -JLr 
Shine, page 12 ^ 



Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

September 24, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 8 



Northwestern State University 



.cting 
egistrar 
voids 
ajor 
ihanges 

lurham wants 
[o simplify 
Registration 



m 



nme a " 




ly JENNIFER ROY 

iff Writer 

Hugh C. Durham III, the acting 
istrar at Northwestern, may be 
unfamiliar face in the registrar's 
jffiee, but he is not new to 
Natchitoches or to Northwestern. 

Durham grew up in 
Natchitoches, where he attended 
St. Mary's 
Academy and 
graduated from 
Natchitoches 
Central High 
School. 

He then 
earned his 
undergraduate 
degree in 
sociology at 
Northwestern, where he was 
commissioned in 1963 for active duty 
through the ROTC department. 

In 1969, he returned to 
Northwestern to serve in the 
military science department for 
three years while he earned his 
master's degree in student personnel 
services. 

Durham retired from the U.S. 
Armyin 1983asalieutenantcolonel 
after servi ng 20 years in the military . 

For the past two years, he has 
forked for Northwestern as the 
coordinator for Central Louisiana 
^grams at England Air Force 
" se. 

Durham said that he accepted 
position of acting registrar 
kcause he felt that he could make a 
Positive contribution to the 
"aiversity. 

"The key to getting things done 
18 communication between the 
administration, faculty, staff and 
^dents," said Durham. 

As the acting registrar, Durham 
Wa nts to try to provide more effective 
^rvices by encouraging the staff to 
™a v e a more positive attitude toward 
toe students. 

He also wants to make 
[fSistration easier by simplifying 



the 



Process and avoiding any major 



toanges from semester to semester, 
his way, he said, students will 
«jiow where to go and what to do 
registration. 
Although some changes may be 
j" ee( ied in the future, it would be a 
^ble mistake to just jump in and 
changes right off the bat," he 



Smothers Brothers: Instant Laughter 




The Smothers Brothers will perform their traveling comedy act at 7 p.m. on ThursrjavJn Pialhex.Coliseum. The act has 
been performing together since the 1960s. Beginning their career performing in a college hang-out, the duo now tours the 
country, stopping at various college campuses along the way. Pictured above is Dick Smothers, on left, and Tom Smoth- 
ers. 

Smothers Brothers to perform 
Thursday at Prather Coliseum 



Fall enrollment 
sets record 

University's student count 
surpasses 7,500 mark 




By MARIA E. JONES 

Staff Writer 

Who is "Yo-Yo Man?" What is the 
"State of Yo," and why should we 
"Just say Yo?" 

The answers to 

8 these thought- 
1101^1^(1111 provoking 
questions and 
many other ir- 
relevant subjects 
BROTHERS will be discussed at 
7 p.m. on Thursday in Prather 
Coliseum when the Smothers 
Brothers bring their satirical wit to 
Northwestern. Students will be 
admitted free with a current I.D. 

The Smothers Brothers started 
their career performing in a college 
hang-out called the "Kerosene Club" 
while they were students at San 
Jose State College in California. 
Since then, they have performed on 
college campuses everywhere 
entertaining students. 

Tom, who plays the guitar, taught 
Dick to play the bass and enlisted 
two other student* to form the 
original group, a quartet that 
performed folk songs. 



The following year they became 
a trio and were hired to play a two- 
week engagement at the "Purple 
Onion" in San Francisco. One of the 
other entertainers was injured, and 
Tom told the owner that they would 
fill the extra time. During the act, 
Tom started making up jokes about 
the music, and the audience began 
to laugh. 

The concept was unusual, and 
the audience loved it. The two-week 
stand became a nine-ppmonth 
engagement, and their act was born. 

The following year they became 
a duo and named themselves the 
"Smothers Brothers." 

Tom believes that entertainment 
reflects issues of the time and their 
material is loaded with controversial 
issues, which is probably the reason 
they are popular with the college 
set. 

Tom admits that he was shy as a 
child, and because of it he became 
the class clown. His favorite 
companion was a pet chicken named 
Brownie, and his favorite 
kindergarten activity was skipping 
school. 



All through school he followed 
the mode of a nonconformist, and 
later he and Dick were fired from 
CBS because of a problem with 
censorship due to the satirical 
nature of their material. 

After their parting with CBS, 
Dick started a winery and raced 
cars, and Tom bought a vineyard 
and went into some nightclubs alone, 
but the brothers are at their best 
when they are together. 

In the late 1970s they did a 
Broadway show, "I Love my Wife." 
After a successful run, they revived 
their act and returned to the 
nightclubs and college campuses. 

The conflict with CBS was later 
resolved, and they did a 20th 
anniversary reunion show. 

Since their comeback, they have 
done TV commercials and have 
worked with the American Lung 
Association as national spokesmen 
and as the Christmas Seals 
chairmen. 

The career of the Smothers 
Brothers is timeless, and they appeal 
to the young adults of today just as 
they did to their parents in the 
1960s. 



Northwestern's student pop- 
ulation hit an all-time high for the 
fourth time in five semesters with a 
fall enrollment of 7,626. 

This is the first time in North- 
western's 107-year history that the 
school has exceeded 7 ,500 students. 
NSU went over the 7,000 mark for 
the first time in the spring of 1990. 

The upward trend in enrollment 
has continued since 1986 when Dr. 
Robert Alost became president. 
Northwestern's enrollment had 
declined between 1981 and 1986 
from 6,722 to 5,272. 

Enrollment has increased by 
2,354 students, an increase of 45 
percent, since Alost took office. The 
enrollment gains show steady 
increases in full-time students, 
i ncoming freshman and registration 
on the main campus in Natchitoches. 

The number of full-time students 
increased by 5.5 percent from 4,954 
to 5,243. Enrollment in the 
Natchitoches campus increased by 
3.0 percent to 5,091 from last fall's 
total of 4,873. 

The full-time student count on 
the Natchitoches campus increased 
by 4.5 percent from 4,235 last year 
to 4,426 this year. 

Alost said the increase 
enrollment was "the result of the 
good news about Northwestern 
continuing to spread." 

"Our office of admissions and 
recruiting has worked extremely 
hard to attract students to 
Northwestern. Our faculty and staff 
has also worked to attract and retain 
outstanding students once they get 
here," he said. 

Students at the university have 



also played a part in the rising 
numbers. 

"They feel so strongly about 
Northwestern that they sell it to 
friends and family," said Alost. 

Alost said the latest statistics 
"are significant because they show 
a continued trend of increased 
enrollment. High school students, 
teachers, principals, guidance 
counselors and non-traditional 
students across the state are 
familiar with Northwestern's 
reputation and our goal to provide 
quality education in all areas." 

The total number of 
undergraduates increased by 5.6 
percent from 6,594 last year to 6,960 
this year. Graduate enrollment 
dropped by 10 percent from 740 to 
666. 

Freshman enrollment, which has 
increased by more than 35 percent 
over the past four years, moved up 
this year with 3,212 compared to 
3,186 last fall. 

The number of sophomores 
increased from 1,297 to 1,383. 
Junior enrollment moved from 975 
to 1,071, and senior enrollment 
increased from 1,105 to 1,261. 

Enrollment on the NSU 
Shreveport campus, comprised 
primarily of of nursing students, is 
up from 1,220 to 1,229. Enrollment 
on the Leesville campus dropped 
from 981 to 822, largely because of 
the impact of the realignment of 
Fort Polk. The number of students 
at other sites in North Louisiana 
dropped from 174 to 76. The 
Alexandria campus showed an 
increase from 404 to 467 students 



Holland to be honored 
at military night 



By DOUG IRELAND 

Contributor 

A tribute to Lt. Col. Donnie 
Holland, a 1970 Northwestern State 
graduate who died in Operation 
Desert Storm, will be a highlight of 
Northwestern's annual Military 
Appreciation Night observance on 
Saturday, as the Demon football 
team opens its home season at 
Turpin Stadium. 

Military personnel and their 
families can receive complimentary 
game tickets for the 7 p.m. game 
between the Demons and the East 
Texas State Lions at 16,000-seat 
Turpin Stadium. 

A fly-by involving F- 15E fighters, 
the type of aircraft flown by Lt. Col. 
Holland, will be a focal point of 
pregame activities which begin at 
6:45 p.m. with a show by the Spirit 



of Northwestern Marching Band. 
The fighter planes will come from 
Lt.Col. Holland's 335th Tactical 
Fighter Squadron stationed at 
Seymour-Johnson Air Force Base 
in North Carolina. 

Northwestern President Robert 
Alost will make a presentation to 
the family of Holland, who was one 
of the first U.S. pilots engaged in 
combat over Baghdad. Attending 
the ceremonies will be his parents, 
Doug and Chris Holland; his 
brothers, Jimmy and Harold, and 
their families; and his sister, JoAnn 
Sims and her family. 

The plaque to be presented to his 
parents reads, "In grateful 
recognition of Lt. Col. Donnie 
Holland for distinguished service 
and the sacrifice of his life for peace 

■ Please see Holland, page 4 




Inside I 


S|lendar 


2 


^hipus Connection 


3 


Editorials 


10 


Lifestyle 


12 


!^ws in Brief 


2 


pinions 


11 


^ction Coverage 


6-7 


^HPer Sports 


8 


inters to the Editor 


11 


e Student Newspaper /^fTtrv^ 
^Northwestern State University yjJill|>i/ 
**t € hitoches, Louisiana vj^^ 




357-5456 



Students have last chance to register 



By MICHELLE GENRE 

News Editor 

Students have one last chance 
today to register for the upcoming 
statewide and local elections, 
according to Debbie Waskom, 
registrar of voters for Natchitoches. 

To meet the deadline, students 
must register today before 6 p.m. at 
the Registrar of Voters Office, 
located at 200 Church St. 

"With such a large portion of the 
Natchitoches population being 
students, a significant impact could 
possibly be made to local election 
results," Waskom said. 

According to Waskom, only one 
out of four Northwestern students 
are registered to vote in 
Natchitoches, but it is possible to ' 
cancel registration in their 



hometown in order to move it to 
Natchitoches. 

Although there was a 40 percent 
increase of students registered to 
vote since last year, only about 130 
students registered to vote in the 
city of Natchitoches, according to 
Scott Andrews, president of the 
Student Government Association. 

"This is one of the most important 
elections to face Louisiana. Students 
should exercise their right to vote. 
Elected officials make decisions that 
affect the students everyday," 
Andrews said. 

This year's statewide ballot will 
include the positions of governor, 
lieutenant governor, commissioner 
of insurance, attorney general, 
secretary, qf state and secretary of 
treasury. The local ballot will 



include state representative, state 
senate, the sheriffs race, clerk of 
court, police jurors and tax 
successor. 

"The Legislature and the 
politicians will not take the students 
seriously until we start voting," said 
Brent Cockrell, a political science 
major from Natchitoches. 

Most students are unaware of 
the importance of their right to vote , 
according to Bobby Gunn, SGA 
senior class senator. 

"Voting registration of college 
students is vital. Being more aware 
of how things are run and how 
elections are done can have a great 
impact on the future," Gunn said. 

For more information on 
registration, call Waskom at 357- 
2211. 



EXX3 YEAR PPCT 


of 

DECISION 

Poll shows Governor's 


Race 3-Way Tie 

242 people 


surveyed 


Koemer 


34% 


Duke 


26% 


Edwards 


22% 


Holloway 


16% 




1% 



Jones 



1% 



Poll conducted by the Student Government Association and 
College Republicans 



Page 2 



September 24, |fep te,nber **• 



Calendar 
of Events 



today 

Career Week 
Intramural Flag Football 

7 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features Kin- 
dergarten Cop in The Alley 



WEDNESDAY 

Career Week 

Intramural Flag Football 

7p.m. 

Charmine Neville in The Alley 



THURSDAY 

Career Week 

Intramural Flag Football 

11a.m. 

Pep Rally at the Student Union 
7p.m. 

The Smothers Brothers in 

Prather Coliseum 



FRIDAY 

Career Week 

Student Loan Application 

Deadline (FALL) 

ROTC Demon Ranger Com- 
petition 



SATURDAY 

3 p.m. 

Tailgate Party at the Prather 
Coliseum parking lot 

7 p.m. 

Demon Football 

The Demons play East Texas at 
Turpin Stadium 

MONDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 



News In Brief 



Career Evaluation Center 
receives grant 

The Career Evaluation and 
Information Center of 
Northwestern's Eugene P. 
Watson Memorial Library has 
received a grant of $161,867 for 
operations in the upcoming year. 

Funding for the CEIC is 
provided by the Coordinating and 
Development Council of 
Shreveport. This is the third year 
the center was funded based on 
an original grant proposal 
submitted by reference librarian 
Fleming Thomas. 

The center covers a 10-parish 
area in northwest Louisiana. It 
serves the unemployed by 
providing career testing and 
counseling. The center provides 
an extensive collection of career 
information in a variety of 
printed and audiovisual formats. 

Charles Caron is the director 
of the center. He directs the 
counseling program, distributes 
information on the program and 
provides referrals to other social 
service agencies. 

The center has two 
counselors, Deborah Jackson and 
Shea Till. Jan Turk is the CEIC 
secretary, handling office 
administration duties. 

Nursing Students exceed 
national passage rate 

Nursing students at 
Northwestern State University 
exceeded the the national passage 
rate on the latest round of the 
National Council Licensure 
Examination for Registered 
Nurses. 

Approximately 94 percent of 
the students in the bachelor's of 
science in nursing degree 
program passed the exam while 
96 percent of those in the 
associate degree program passed. 
On the average, 85 percent of 
those taking the test around the 
nation pass. 

The exam is given to protect 
the public and to show that the 
nurse can provide safe care to the 
patient," said Carol Allen, 
associate director for 




Tickets are now on sale in the Student Activities Board office, room 214 of the Student Union, 
for the Oct. 18 Homecoming concert featuring The Kentucky Headhunters. 



undergraduate studies in nursing 
at NSU. "We're proud of the test 
results." 

All nursing graduates in 
Louisiana must take the two-day 
test which is administered at the 
Louisiana Superdome. The 
examination consists of 360 
questions divided into four parts. 

NSU graduates have 
consistently performed above the 
national norm on the test. 

Science paper to be 
published 

A paper written by Dr. Tom 
Burns, head of Northwestern State 
University's Department of Life 
Sciences, and NSU professor of 
biology Dr. Dick Stalling has been 
accepted for publication. 

The paper "Urinary Proteins 
in Four Rodent Species" will 
appear in the journal, 
Comparative Biochemistry and 
Physiology, which is published in 
New York and London by 
Pergamon Press. 

Burns and Stalling conducted 
the study to determine the levels 
of proteinurea in rodents. Other 
mammals with the exception of 



rodents do not excrete urine. 

The Northwestern biologists 
found that male rodents excreted a 
large quantity of low molecular 
proteins and used those proteins 
as boundary markers to show 
territory that they controlled. 

Burns and Stalling also found 
that larger females excreted larger 
amounts of protein. Female 
rodents used their protein as a 
marker to indicate themselves to 
male rodents and to tell the male 
they were capable of producing a 
large litter. 

Caron addresses career 
assessment at conference 

Charles Caron, director of the 
Career Evaluation and 
Information Center at 
Northwestern's Watson Library, 
delivered a presentation at the 
Southeast Training Association 
Conference in Fort Walton, Fla. 
last week. He was assisted in the 
presentation by Deborah Jackson 
of the CEIC. 

Caron addressed the subject of 
career assessment and counseling 
and its implications for economic 
development through maximizing 



an individual's potential. 

Caron encouraged those 
attending the conference to utilize 
the program he has developed in 
other states. The program, funded 
by a grant from the Coordinating 
and Development Corporation of 
Shreveport, provides an effective 
and unique program for residents 
of 10 northwest Louisiana 
parishes. 

The appearance at the 
conference was arranged by Sam 
Scott of the MDC Corporation, 
which is based in North Carolina. 

SAB announces 
Homecoming theme 

The Student Activities Board 
has announced the theme for 
Homecoming 1991. The theme for 
Northwestern's Homecoming this 
year will be "Pride and Ambition: 
A Northwestern Tradition." The 
Homecoming parade is scheduled 
on Thursday, Oct. 17 and will 
follow the Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival route. 

Organizations wishing to 
participate in the parade and float 
competition must have their entry 
form to the Student Activities 
Board office in the Student Union 
by Tuesday, Oct. 1. 

KNWD to announce 
football games 

Northwestern home football 
games will be covered on the 
campus radio station KNWD, 
beginning with the first home 
game against East Texas State on 
Saturday. 

Play-by-play will be handled 
by KNWD disc jockey Paul Parker 
and "color" will be given by KNWD 
General Manager Jason Oldham. 
Game time is set for 7 p.m. in 
Turpin Stadium. 

Recital announced 

Sigma Alpha Iota Music 
fraternity will hold a musical 
recital at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday 
in the Recital Hall. The recital is 
free of charge and open to the 
public. 




Currei^EEEEE 
Sauc 



P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State Univeraj 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 7l4j 

(UPS 140-660) 




Organizations 

Organizational ; 
a current memb 
(bnuttedtotheO 
iv ities and Org 
,y,Oct. linon 
standing. Orgar 
^ go will forfeit tl 
^ charter from Ni 



How to reach the S*^"^ ^ 



P 



To subscribe to The Sauc, J^ns, will 

! after and an organ 



Subscriptions 357- 5! ifjjj.^ 



To place an ad 

Local ads 
National ads 



u privileges that g 
All organizati 
oS'J ,uired to maintai 
Vin the organizati 
t« exception is to 
Question about billing W. a d 

Sales Manager 357-5, le Franc 

357-5J ^gjtment 

Organizations r 
^that all events a 



department 

Campus Connection 
Editor 

Editorial/Opinion 
Lifestyles 
News 
Sports 



Activ 



,„ .hjversity master c£ 
^For additional 
g^tact Henry in rc 

357-5* 
357-5* 
357-54LJ > 



The Current Sauce is locate! 
the Office of Student Publication 
225 Kyser Hall. 

The Current Sauce is publisl ^ 
every, week during-ihe fall byj 
students of North western State (Jouisiana 
versity of Louisiana. It is not a 
ated with any of the university'^ 
partments and is financed i 
dently. 



The deadline for all advei 
ments is 5 p.m. the Thursday 

fore publication. 



Music has always 
, Natalie Neugent, 
.cent trip to Ger 
iver how impor 
Neugent, a ji 
Schola: 
sjlorthwestern Sta 
jcently returned I 
indep ermany where sh 
iternational Youtl 
stival, held in th 
imposer Richa 
icted students a: 



esim 



Inclusion of any and all 
rial is left to the discretion of 
editor. 



The Current Sauce will not 
printed on November 26, 199 1 dui 
the university's Thanksgiving Hi 
day. 



The Current Sauce is en ten 
second-class mail at Natchitock 
LA. 



Postmaster: send address 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 
O Current Sauce 



SAB presents more good times for Northwestern: 

Schwarzenegger qq |y| £ 



SCj 



round the world w 
mrchestra, choirs 



otter 
tudents 



Go ahead, 
you tell him you 
didn't do your 
homework. 




KInelsrgarfen 

COP 

An .in undercover cop.. .he's in a class by himself. 

T OH/6f/t 

in M alley 

7:00 pm 



Student Activities Board News 

The SAB is taking applications for the 
position of representative-at-large. 
Applicants must complete a form in the SAB 
office, room 214 of the Student Union, before 
noon onTuesday, Oct. 1. Any student may 
apply. No prior Board experience is needed 

to fill this position. 



SIT ON 
MY 
TAIL 

TAILGATE PARTY I 

presenting 

KROSSFYRE 

Saturday, September 28 
Coliseum parking lot 

3:00 - 6:00 pm ■ 

NEVILLE 

Wednesday, September 25 
In The Alley 
7:00 pm 



LEIGH FLYN1 

hjf Writer 
Lottery ticket sa: 
changesi Sort of the state 
nsu jost the economy 
ff, according to son 
finesses. 
Many business 
venue profit from 
Wlege Avenue T 
alesof $1500 daily 
ales. The business 
tven days a week. 
Pat's Economy 
lies of $200 daily, i 
'askom, owner of 
"We started sel 
we only sell 
*kly. Saturday ai 
! one day," saidW 
Another busines 
*ets six days a 
fothers. Philip Ac 
tore, said that the 



70 st 
or cai 

1 TINA M. FOR 

W Writer 
Approximately 
e8 tern students, 
0ni the Shrevepo 
* ir vote in the 
^ion, according t 
' Ce president o 
^ernment Assoc: 
After the polls cL 
*SGA enators t 
e tallying pi 
* e rvised by H 
^tor of housini 
^ of students; i 
re ctor of orga 
^nt activities. 
J^ectedtotheHc 
jTammy Clary, 
' h Gowland, 

^ns and Nicole 
A nm-off betwe 
' fi eth Gowlanc 

2 an election fo 

fduled on W 
Slav. 

^ appreciate 
J? °ut to cast t 
J'»nd. "We ho 
. e students part 

^and Mr. NS 
he newly-elec 
C^s include fi 
Jfc and Jill Pai 

J^thvin and J 

*th ** ve senatx 
^ v Allen, Jenni: 

«, ee > Kip Patrick 

*ould like toe 



" ia nette Lee, K 
ie Najolia,And 



and you say there's nothing to do...yea rigid ijg 



Library of Inti 

'S.278 TOPICS ■ AL 

Catalog Today with 



800- 



^ r , u fl s H2.00to: Rest 
<2» Ave. #206-A, L 



mber24, 1 U en,ber24 ' 1991 



NEWS 



Page 3 



jrrer 



AMPUS connections 



»3UC&or*a nizations 

Organizational Renewal Cards 

. a c urrent membership list must 
ox5306 '.^nutted to the Office of Student 
State Universities and Organizations by 
Louisiana 7l 4 1 border to remain in 

40-660. '^standing. Organizations faihng 
^ ^ will forfeit their recognition 
i c harte r from Northwestern. If 

„ iha c. udent Activities and 

feminizations, will withdraw the 

(jterand an organization will lose 

e privileges that go along with it. 

' AH organizations are also 

357 & mjired to maintain an NSU P.O. 

^ 57 "5 pin the organization's name. The 

ily exception is to have the mail 

m \ ceived at a department, such as 

> Cercle Francais-Language 

357 ' 5! ; p artment. 

Organizations must also make 

neWS (re that all events are placed on the 

liversity master calendar. 

tion 357-5 For additional information, 

^ 57 ' 51 Htact Henry in room 214 of the 
357-5( u 



357-1 
357-! 
357-! 



Student Union or at 357-6511. 

Alpha Phi Alpha 

The officers of Alpha Phi Alpha 
for the 1991-1992 academic year are 
Malcolm Rene, president; Calvin 
Hearns, vice president; Paxton 
Girtman; secretary/ treasurer, and 
John Ross, chaplain. 

Any male interested in becoming 
a member of the fraternity should 
attend an information seminar at 8 
p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 3 in the 
President's Room of the Student 
Union. Dress will be semi-formal. 

Batgiris 

A meeting will be held at 7 p.m. 
on Wednesday in the Purple and 
White Room of the field house for 
anyone interested in becoming a 
Demon Batgirl. For more 
information, call 352-1789. 

Blue Key 

Members of Blue Key will be 
selling ribbons for home football 



games on Thursd ay in the Student 
Union lobby. 

Black Student Association 

BSA will have a meeting 
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in Kyser 
Auditorium. 

Extra-large t -shirts are on sale 
in the BSA office. 

Code Fon 

Code Fon will not practice this 
week. Athletes should call Ed Coker 
for a schedule of gfames. 

Kappa Alpha Onler 

KA will hold its annual Slave 
Auction on Tuesday, Oct. 1. For 
more information, call any KA or the 
KA house. 

The exchange with Tri Sigma 
will be held at 9 p .m. today. 

Phi Mu 

Flag football players should 
meet at 5 p.m. on the field prior to 
the game at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. 



Study hall will begin on Monday. 
Members should bring two sheets of 
poster paper to the meeting at 6 
p.m. on Sunday. 

PRSSA 

Northwestern's chapter of the 
Public Relation Student Society of 
America will meet at 2 p.m. on 
Mondays in room 225 Kyser Hall. 
Anyone interested in public relations 
should attend. 

PRSSA will be raffling off a keg 
of Miller Light. The drawing will be 
held on Monday, Oct. 7. Call 357- 
5456 for more information. 

Purple Jackets 

Purple Jackets will meet at 5 
p.m. on Thursday in room 320 of the 
Student Union. For more 
information, call Tammy Clary at 
357-5005. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Tri Sigma will have an exchange 
with KA at 9 p.m. today. 



A free car wash will be held 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday at 
Pizza Inn. Actives are responsible 
for getting sponsors. 

SPJ 

The Society of Professional 
Journalists is sponsoring a forum 
with Frank May from the Shreveport 
Times at 7 p.m. on Wednesday in the 
Cane River Room of the Student 
Union. May will speak on careers in 
journalism, as well as how SPJ can 
benefit students. A membership 
drive will also be conducted at this 
time . For more information, call Scott 
Jolley or Steve Horton at 357-5456. 

Theta Chi 

All active brothers must attend 
a mandatory meeting at 7:30 today. 
Another meeting for all actives will 
be held at 7 p.m. Sunday. 

New pledges are Larrion 
Hillman and Jeff Stanfield. 



Zeta Phi Beta 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. will 
sponsor "Showtime at the Apollo- 
Zeta Style" at 8 p.m. Friday at Ruby's 
Blue Room, located on Martin Luther 
King Jr. Drive. Anyone interested in 
performing should call Yalaunda 
Taylor at 357- 1094 or Marie Johnson 
at 352-1424. 



IjSC junior attends German music festival 



Sauce is locate! Music has always been important 
;nt Publication! ,Natalie Neugent, but only after a 
jcent trip to Germany did she 

, ■ iscover how important it was. 
Sauce is publisl „ • 
befall byj Neugent a junior in the 
western Stateiouisiana Scholars College at 
ia. Itisnotasatorthwestern State University, 
he university* jcently returned from Bayreuth, 
financed indep jermany where she attended the 
iternational Youth Festival. The 
stival, held in the hometown of 

henlliradTl »P° 8er Richard Wagner, 
UFS ay ttracted students and scholars from 

round the world who took part in 

any and all mi rchestra, choirs and musical 
discretion of I 



Sauce will not! 
ber26, 1991 dm 
hanksgiving 



■sauce is entered 
at Natch itock 



address changes! 



y LEIGH FLYNN 

laff Writer 

Lottery ticket sales are the latest 
Sort of the state of Louisiana to 
D Box 5306, NSU oost the economy and it is paying 
», la 71497. ^according to some Natchitoches 

it Sauce 

isinesses. 

Many businesses on College 
venue profit from the sales. The 
Allege Avenue Texaco averages 
Jlesof $1500 daily in lottery ticket 
lies. The business sells the tickets 
tven days a week. 
Pat's Economy Store averages 
lies of $200 daily, according to Lee 
feskom, owner of the business. 
"We started selling them late, 
id we only sell them six days 
wkly. Saturday and Sunday count 
lone day," said Waskom. 
Another business that sells the 
c ^ets six days a week is Ackel 
Whers. Philip Ackel, owner of the 
tofe, said that the lottery "creates 



970 students turnout 
for campus election 



workshops. 

Neugent, who is from Euless, 
Texas, had planned to spend the 
summer at home. Her plans 
changed when she found out about 
the festival through David Pituch, a 
professor at Northwestern 
University and friend of Scholars' 
College professor Tom Samet. 

"I found out in mid-July and 
started getting things together as 

quickly as I could," said Neugent. "I 
knew the opportunity to go to 

Germany and experience Wagner 
was an excellent one. We had talked 



about Wagner in class but I never 
knew a great deal about him and his 
music." 

Neugent, a bassoon player, is a 
member of the Natchitoches/ 
Northwestern Symphony Orchestra 
and the NSU Wi;ng and Ensemble. 
While at the festi val, she played in 
the choir orchestra on Mozart's 
cantata "Davide Penitente." 

She practiced about three hours 
a day and had enough free time to 

see Bayreuth. Th e main attraction 
in Bayreuth is tht i opera house built 
by Wagnerin 1876!. Wagneroversaw 



ottery tickets sell quickly in town 
tudents, Natchitoches residents play-oh 



a lot of traffic, but it's worth it." 
Ackel Brothers sells between $400 
and $700 daily. 

Northwestern students, 
however, will not be able to buy the 
tickets on campus because Wallace's 
Bookstore is not participating in 
the ticket sales. 

"Selling the tickets would not be 
in the best interest of the University 
at this time," according to Fred 
Fulton, dean of students. He also 
said that if tickets were sold on 
campus, the public might think that 
Northwestern promotes the lottery. 

"The University represents many 
students with different views. We 
have an obligation to all of our 
students," said Fulton. 

Fulton added that the University 
might sell tickets in the future, but 
no plans have been set. He advises 
the bookstore on items such as the 
lottery ticket sales which might 



cause problems. 

Students on campus have 
differing views on the sale of lottery 
tickets. Marcus Foote, a senior at 
Louisiana Scholars' College, said, "I 
don't think that tl le bookstore should 
sell the tickets. Students are too 
irresponsible and would just waste 
their money." 

However, Lee Bennett, a junior 
physical therap}' major, said that 
"any way the University could create 
revenue would be good." 



^TlNA m. FORET 

W Writer 

Approximately 970 North- 
ern students, including 225 
0lB the Shreveport campus, cast 
vote in the recent campus 
^on, according to Beth Gowland, 
1Ce president of the Student 
^ernment Association. 
After the polls closed on Sept. 19, 
* SGA senators tallied the votes. 
e tallying procedure was 
'Pervised by Harold Boutte, 
of housing; Fred Fulton, 
f 88 of students; and Carl Henry, 
*etor of organizations and 
^nt activities, 
^-'ected to the Homecoming court 
•^Tammy Clary, queen; Eve Cox, 
! Q Gowland, Cathy Huey, 
^nette Lee, Kim McKinney, 
^ Najolia, Andree' Rizzo, Leslie 

and Nicole Tujaque. 
. run-off between Linda Davis 
3 B eth Gowland for Miss NSU 
,, a n election for Mr. NSU are 
billed 

if* 

^ appreciate everyone who 
' * °ut to cast their vote," said 
and. "We hope to see many 
^ 8 tudents participating in the 
^ and Mr. NSU elections." 
^ newly-elected SGA class 
include freshmen Bobby 
'm ^ e and Jill Parker and juniors 
J^ethvin and Jacques Vilar. 
le five senators-at-large are 



students to go to their newly-elected 
senators on any problems or 
suggestions for the SGA," said Scott 
Andrews, SGA president. "Tell them 
any ideas that you have because 
you could better the student body of 
Northwestern." 



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every aspect of its construction and 
members of his family still control 
the opera house. 

"Wagner thought the opera 
houses of his day were not adequate 
for his new type of opera so he built 
his own," said Neugent. "The stage 
is so huge that they are able to use 
tremendous sets and sets are coming 
out of the floor and from overhead." 

During her stay, Neugent 
attended Wagner's entire "Ring 
Cycle" which lasted approximately 
30 hours. 

"It was overwhelming to actually 
be there," said Neugent. "Demand 
for tickets is huge. People pay the 
equivalent of hundreds of dollars 
and wait years for tickets." 

The trip to Germany was 
Neugent's first journey outside the 
United States. 

"I had a chance to meet people 
from all over the world and learn 
about different cultures and ways of 
studying. That was an important 
part of the trip," she said. 

Neugent hopes to use some of the 
knowledge she gained in research 
on her senior thesis, which will be a 
study Germanic approaches to myth 
and music. 






CLEANERS 




10% 

Discounted 

with student I.D. 



John Wingo Formal Wear 

233 Scarborough St. 
352-2939 



P age4 



NEWS 



September 24, ]\ 



geptembc 



Exercise options offer students affordable, practical fitness 



By AMY STASZAK 

Staff Writer 

"No pain, no gain" exercise is out. 
I tactical exercise which can be 
r .neficial to students wanting to 
! . e weight and keep in shape is in. 

Students have several fitness 
i :ions around town and on-campus 
from which to chose. 

Some students develop their own 
program. Christine Loefstedt, a 
junior from New Orleans, walks on 
a regular schedule keep in shape. 

"I walk not only for the exercise, 
but it helps relieves a lot of stress," 
said Loefstedt. "Walking is more 
convenient for me because I can do 
it at anytime." 

Another on-campus option is the 
Intramural Building. Free of charge 
to students, the IM Building offers a 
variety of equipment which work on 
muscle tone and personal 
maintenance. 



38 teams 

to compete 

in football 
Record numbers 
compete for 
championship 



An increase of 40 percent in 
participation highlighted the 
beginning of the Intramural Flag 
Football team season. Over 130 
games will be played the next three 
weeks as 38 teams compete for a 
chance to be named All-Campus 
Champions. 

Games will be played Monday 
through Thursday and Sunday 
afternoons on the ROTC and 
ntramural flag football fields. 
Games begin at 3:30 p.m. on 
weekdays and 3 p.m. on weekends. 

In the men's division, 26 teams 
will compete in four leagues 
(Orange, Purple, Greek and 
Rapides) to earn a spot in the all- 
campus tournament. Each league 
will consist of seven teams except 
the Greek, which will only have 
five. 

Nine dorm teams will be 
competing this season. Seven of 
those teams will form the first-ever 
Rapides Dorm League, while teams 
from Natchitoches and Boozeman 
dorms will compete in the open 
league. According to Dr. 

Newman, director of Leisure 
Activities, "The large volume of 
teams can be attributed to the 
outstanding freshman class, and an 
intense marketing effort in the 
dorms by the Leisure Activities 
marketing committee and the 
Leisure Activities sports 
ambassadors." 

The flag football preseason 
tournament was held Sept. 19 
through Sept. 22. The tournament 
was designed to give teams a tuneup 
before the season starts. 

In the men's championship game 
on Sunday, D-Quickness defeated 
Kappa Alpha 22-14. 

In other intramural news, eight 
meet records were broken at the 
NSU Intramural swim meet held 
last Thursday at the Recreation 
Complex. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon, led by Chris 
Piatt's three first-pl ace finishes , ran 
away with the men's title, while Phi 
Mu, rallying behind Tracy Najolia, 
conquered the women's 
championship. 

TKE finished first in six of eight 
events to dominate the rest of the 
men's field. Piatt won the 25-meter 
butterfly, the 50-meter breaststroke 
and then set a meet record in the 50- 
meter freestyle with a time of 2 1.28. 

TKE also set new meet records in 
the 100-meter medley relay, 
covering the distance in 57.63, and 
in the 200-meter freestyle relay, 
knocking almost 14 seconds off the 
oldrecord with a staggering 1:58.06. 

Najolia set three of five meet 
records in the women's division. Tri 
Sigma began the competition by 
shattering the 100-meter medley 
relay record with a time of 1:11.26. 
Tri Sigma was leading after the 
first four events when Najolia 
stepped forward. 

She finished first in each of the 
next three races, setting a new meet 
standard in each. She took the 25- 
meter butterfly in 15.10, the 50- 
meter breaststroke in 38.22, and 
the 50-meter freestyle in 31.52. 
Najolia then led her team to victory 
in the 200-meter freestyle relay, 
which clinched first place for Phi 
Mu. 



Dr. Gene Newman, director of 
the Intramural Building, suggested 
that those interested in losing 
weight should burn more calories 
than they take in. 

"One must change his eating 
habits, lifestyle and outlook on fife 
when deciding to lose weight," said 
Newman. "Remaining consistent 
can also aid in successful weight 
loss." 

This year, Newman said, the IM 
Building will offer aerobic classes 
free of charge to students. 

Although there are not certified 
trainers to help, different exercises 
are posted on the walls near the 
equipment that can benefit the 
individual. Desk workers, who have 
some knowledge of the equipment 
and exercises, are available to 
students. 

"Gender need not be a factor," 
said Newman. "Just about as many 



females as males come to work out." 

Off-campus health club options 
include the Natchitoches Health and 
Racquet Club, located at 400 College 
Ave., and Body World, located at 
1007 Claudia. " 

Natchitoches Health and 
Racquet Club offers aerobics, 
racquetball, basketball, weight 
machines, free weights and a protein 
bar. 

"Of the current membership 
about 15 percent are NSU students," 
said Ralph Cook, owner of the club. 

The club has three personal 
trainers available to assist each 
member in developing a beneficial 
exercise program. 

Natchitoches Health and 
Racquet Club offers student 
discounts which include a flat rate 
of $100 for the entire fall semester 
or monthly rates of $22.50 plus an 
entry fee of $25. 



Body World's student mem- 
bership is up to 3 5 percent, even 
though it is locate id a bit farther 
from campus. 

Asun bed, steam room, whirlpool, 
sauna, outdoor pool, free weights, 
weight machines*, racquetball, 
aerobics andjuicebar are available 
to- members seven days a week. 
Body World also has personal 
trainers who are w illing to assist in 



programs. 

Brooke Williams, a senior from 
Natchitoches, said that she really 
enjoys her exercise program at Body 
World. She makes time at least 
three days a week to exercise. 

Since May, Williams has lost a 
totals of 15 pounds by using a step- 
aerobics exercise class_and lifting 
weights. 

"I have to make the time and 



make myself go, but it has t 
worth it," said Williams. "I ad- 
students to work out because itn 
you feel more energetic." 

Although Body World price? 
not to be given out unless 
individual decides to join, DeeJUj 
a Body JrVorld employee, said t 
the memberships costs I 
"comparable to the other club.' 



Holland: To be honored 



■ Continued from page 1 
and freedom. From his alma mater, 
Northwestern State University." 

All war veterans will be 
recognized, along with the more than 
200 Northwestern students who 
took apart in Operation Desert 
Storm. 

Northwestern athletic director 
Tynes Hildebrand said more than 
7,000 tickets have been made 
available to military personnel at 
Barkdale Air Force Base, England 
Air Force Base and Fort Polk, along 
with area Louisiana National Guard 
and ROTC units. 

Among the other attractions for 
Military Night will be the 
participation of an Apache 
helicopter and a Huey helicopter 
and a KC-10 tanker which was 
deployed in Desert Storm. 

A patriotic halftime show is 



planned, said Bill Brent, director of 
the Spirit of Northwestern band. 

Along with the football game, 
pregame and halftime shows, 
military personnel are invited to 
arrive early and participate in the 
Northwestern Student Activities 
Board "Tailgating Party" from 3-6 
p.m. in the east parking lot of 
Prather Coliseum. Live 
entertainment will be featured, and 
concessions will be available. 

Northwestern has been rated 
among the country's top 20 1-AA 
teams in five of the last six seasons 
and among the top 10 in three of the 
last four years. 

East Texas State won the Lone 
Star Conference title last year and 
played in the NCAA Division II 
playoffs, reaching the quarterfinals. 
They are ranked fourth nationally. 



Hours Mon-Fri 10am -6pm 
Saturday 10am - 5pm 



For Heaven's Sake 
Bookstore 

Only Christian Bookstore in Natchitoches 



i 



N.S.U. Discount 5% 



With I.D 



• Western Union Services 

• Christian T- Shirts 

• Layaway Plans 

• "Color of Love" Greeting Cards ] 

• Large Selection of Bibles, Books, Plaques, 

and Gifts. 



335CCTB f^er!Jrpphg 

Center 
Ntatchtochss,l7\71457 



"God Bless You" 



Phone# 
357-1670 



Good news for 
people who shop 



S3 



yoi 




It's 



Now you can use the Card for everything 
the Campus Bookstore sells. 

Now it's easier than ever to pick up Plato, discover Proust, or even show your 
colors with a new campus sweatshirt. Just pay for whatever you need at the 
bookstore with the American Express* Card. 

No American Express Card? No problem. 

To become a Cardmember just complete and return one of the American Express 
Student Applications available at the bookstore. Once you're approved, you can 
enjoy added student Card privileges like discounted roundtrip airfares on 
Continental Airlines and great new long-distance savings with MCI. 

So shop your bookstore today. From classic books to classic wear, jBll 
the news is ...you can use the Card lor everything you buy Hi Cards 



Northwestern State Univer sity— University Bookstore 

Student Union Building, Caspari Street 

; Store hours: August lS>-23, 7:30 am-5:30 pm. 

Your Best Pt'ace to Shop! 



sei 



AT 



de 



G 



'Good 
per sti 

©199 



September 24, 1991 



Page 5 




Make sure your road trip proceeds without a hitch. 



^ATII ( tilling ( <trd 



83b ODD fa^80 III I 



81ft eCfi *740 1 50 



Sometimes road trips can be a little more adventurous than you expect them to be. Which is why 



you should always pack your AT&T Calling Card. □ It's all you need to make a call from almost anywhere to anywhere. 



It's the least expensive way to call state-to-state on AT&T when you can't dial direct. And you'll be connected to the reliable 



service you've come to expect from AT&T □ Plus, if you get your Calling Card now, you'll also get a free hour's worth of 



AT&T long distance calling* And you'll become a member of AT&T Student Saver Plus, a program of products and services 



designed to save students time and money □ The AT&T Calling Card. It's the best route to wherever you're going. 



Get an AT&T Calling Card today. Call 1 800 654-0471 Ext. 4812. 



"Good for one hour ol direct dialed, coast to coast, night and weekend calling, 
per student Offer valid through June 30. 1992 
(&1991 AT&f 



based on prices effective 2/16/91 Offer limited to one $8.25 AT&T Long Distance Certificate 



AT&T 



J 



1 



WOW*" 



September 24, 199^ pt 



YEAR of DECISION 



HOMECOMING COURT 



MISS 










Tammy Clary 
Queen 



Eve Cox 



Beth Gowland Cathy Huey Anjanette Lee Kim McKinney Trade Najolia Andree Rizzo Leslie Stevens Nicole Tujagu, 



SENATOR - AT - LARGE 




Kathy 
Allen 




Jennifer 
Berry 




Oscar 
George 




Kip 

Patrick 




Nicole 
Rice 



JUNIOR SENATOR 




f "J 


"f' 
■\ A 


Ted 

Methvin 


Jacques 
Vilar 



FRESHMAN SENATOR 




Bobby 
George 




Jill 

Parker 




CAKEER WEEK 
SCHEDULE 



TUESDAY, September 24, 1991 

Career Fair Businesses display in Student Union (Free Pizza and T-Shirts 

to participating students ). 

WEDNESDAY. September 25, 1991 

Speakers and Seminars— Free T -Shirts to Winners 

9:00 a.m. Social Work "Client Worker Relations". Panel Discussion. 

Room 309 Kyser Hall 

10:00 a.m. Professional Dress". Bette Howell. Faculty Lounge, Student Union 
10:00 a.m. The Gas and Oil Industry". John Johnson, NERCO. 

Room 427. Kyser Hall. 

10:00 a.m. "The Music Industry", Dave Hardin, Shreveport Music. 

Room 122. Fine Arts Building. 

11:00 a.m. Environmental Quality", Tom Hataway, DEQ. Room 201, Bienvenu 
12:00 noon Win the Interview". Frances Watkins Conine 

Room 221, Student Union 

2:00 p.m. What Do I Do With A Liberal Arts Degree? . Dr Sara Burroughs 

Cane River Room, Student Union. 

2:00-2:50 p.m. Dining Etiquette" Dr. Virginia Crossno. 

President s Room, Student Union. 

2 00 p.m. Business Credentials", Margaret Kilcoyne Room 232. Student Union. 
2:00 p.m. Careers in Physical Therapy". Lana Wilson LSU Medical Center. 

Faculty Lounge, Student Union 



2:00 p.m. "Careers in Statistics". Ken Gardner, Boots Pharmaceutical. 

Room 443. Kyser Hall 

2:30 p.m. Careers in Social Sciences and Humanities" 

Cane River Room. Student Union. 

7:00 p.m. Careers in Journalism", Frank May, Shreveport Times. 

Cane River Room. Student Union. 

THURSDAY, September 26, 1991 

9:30 a m. The Accounting Field", Merlin Squyres. CPA. Room 427, Kyser Hall. 
9:30 a.m. Legal Careers", Panel of Lawyers describe different areas of law 

Room 427. Kyser Hall. 

10:00 a.m. About Willamette", Jerry Smith. Room 204, Business Building. 
10:00 a.m. "Professional Dress", Bette Howell. Faculty Lounge, Student Union. 
10:30 a.m. "Fields in Clinical Psychology", Dr. Carol Griffith. 

Room 337, Bienvenu Building. 

11:00 a.m. "Social Work; A Profession of Many Faces' . Panel of Social Workers 

discuss different fields. Room 206, Kyser Hall. 

11:00 a.m. "Careers in Medical Technology", Connie Conine, Medical 

Technologist Room 112, Bienvenu Building. 

11:00 a.m. "Industry and Manufacturing". Room 107, Williamson. 

12:00 noon "Win the I nterview". Frances Watkins Coinine. 

Room 221, Student Union 



12:30 p.m. "Careers in Merchandising". Bette Howell. 
Faculty Lounge. Student Union, 
1:00 p.m. Health and Physical Education Careers in Athletic Training and 
Coaching", Dr Bill Dickens. Room 232, Student Union. 
2:00 p.m. "Aviation Science Careers' Room 443. Kyser Hall. 
2:00 p.m. "Real World 101 Co-op Education". Margaret Kilcoyne. 
Room 232. Student Union 

2:00-3:15 p.m. "Dining Etiquette", Dr. Virginia Crossno. 
President's Room. Student Union. 

3:30 p.m. "The Poultry Industry", Russ Danzy Room 108. Williamson. 
6:00 p.m. "Careers in Public Relations" Cane River Room 
FRIDAY, September 27, 1991 

9:00 a.m. Banner Contest Judging Student Union. 

9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. "Selecting a Major Testing and Test Interpretation". 

Room 401, Kyser Hall. 

Student Exchange 



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from 
rating 
abilit 
supei 
expei 
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24, 19 9 K ember 24,1991 



Page 7 




YEAR of DECISION 




FINANCIAL AID UPDATE 



MISS NSU: Vote for 1 



MR. NSU: Vote for 1 




Tujagu, 



Linda 
Davis 



raining ant 



retation". 



▼ Student Activities 
Board 

President 

Secretary/Treasurer 
Directors Award 
NACA Delegate 
Summer Council 
Representative-at- 

Large Chairman 
Thanksgiving Food 

Drive Chairman 
Campus Survey 

Coordinator 
Special Events 

Committee 

▼ Phi Mu Sorority 
Scholarship 

Chairman 
Recording Secretary 
Historian 
Intramurals 
Spirit Committee 
T NSU Yell Leaders 

▼ Resident Assistant 
T Rho Chi 

▼ Homecoming Queen 

▼ Freshman Connector 

▼ Committee on 
Organizations 

▼ Gavel Club 

▼ Students Come First 
Roundtable 

▼ Ninth Wave 

T Louisiana Association 
of Educators 

▼ VIP Box Hostess 

▼ Admissions Recruiting 
Hostess 

▼ Fun & Fitness Sports 

Camp Staff 




Beth 
Gowland 



▼ Student Government 
Association 

Vice-President 
Commissioner of 

Elections 
Senator-at-Large 
COSGA Delegate 
Senator of the month 
Memorial Committee 
Traffic Appeals Board 
Constitution 

Revisions Committee 
Homecoming 

Committee 
Student Services 

Committee 

▼ Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Sorority 

Parliamentarian 
Efficiency Chairman 
Pledge Review Board 
Spirit Committee 
Public Relations 

Committee 
Intramurals 

▼ Freshman Connector 
T College Republicans 

Treasurer 

▼ Committee on 

Organizations 

▼ Peer Leaders 

Coalition 
Drug Free Camp 
Counselor 

▼ BACCHUS 

T Hall Assistant 






First time borrowers may 
pick up loan checks 



Brad 


Morgan 


Todd 


Brown 


uomns 


iviariin 


T Demon Football 


▼ Kappa Sigma 


T Student Government 


Starting 


Fraternity 


Association 


Quarterback 


Vice-President 


Treasurer 


Starting Running 


Treasurer 


Junior Senator 


Back 


Asst. Treasurer 


Supreme Court Chief 


▼ Fellowship of 


Active of the Year 


Justice 


Christian Athletes 


Scholarship 


Finance Committee 


▼ Dean's List 


Chairman 


Club Sports 


▼ Black Student 


House Manager 


Committee 


Association 


Fundraiser 


Ethics Committee 


TKNWD 


Chairman 


Internal Affairs 


Gospel Producer 


Grand Conclave 


Committee 


▼ Current Sauce Staff 


Delegate 


City Council 




▼ Interfraternity 


Representative 




Council 


▼ Kappa Alpha Order 




Vice-President 


Parliamentarian 




Rush Chairman 


Historian 




▼ PRSSA member 


Ritualist 




T Student Government 


Prodential Committee 




Association 


Social Committee 




Supreme Court 


▼ Current Sauce 




Justice 


Business Manager 




Sophomore Senator 


Editorialist 




▼ Dean's List 


Advertising Sales 




T Blue Key 


Manager 




▼ Resident Assistant 


Distribution 




La. School for Math, 


▼ Gavel Club 




Science and the 






Arts 






▼ Phi Mu Gentleman's 






Court 





By J. Craig Poleman, financial 
aid director 

The Financial Aid Office has sev- 
eral items to announce to students 
this week. 

All first-time student loan bor- 
rowers with less than 30 total hours 
may begin picking up their loan 
checks. Some students may find that 
their check is not here. If so, you 
may not be processed at this time or 
your check may be on the way from 
the bank. 

All PLUS/SLS loan borrowers 
need to complete a deferment and 
turn it in to the Registrar's Office 
for completion. 

Shirley Scott in Student Employ- 
ment recently completed the first 
pay period. After review of these 
reports, she will notify those stu- 
dents who signed up for employ- 



ment in our office. If she does not 
notify you, then that means that 
there are not any positions avail- 
able. Only 250 positions are avail- 
able on all campuses. 

The Controller's Office mailed 
out statements to all students who 
have a remaining balance at this 
time. If you are waiting on your aid 
to pay off this remaining balance, 
then you do not need worry. You 
will pay off your balance upon re- 
ceipt of your aid. 

Because there are several stu- 
dents who have not been processed, 
the financial aid office will not see 
students on Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday afternoons from noon to 
4 :30 p.m. If you come in at this time, 
you will be asked to make an ap- 
pointment if it is necessary. 



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A good place to start looking for answers 
is in the ratings of independent analysts. 
Three companies, all widely recognized 
resources for finding out how strong a 
financial services company really is, gave 
TIAA their top grade. 

IN THE FINAL ANALYSIS, TIA A 
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TIAA received A+ from A.M. Best Co., 
AAA from Standard & Poor's and Aaa 
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Page 8 



September 24, 1991 



SUPER SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 



Memphis St. 31, Arkansas St. 21 
Nevada 72, North Texas 
McNeese 31, Montana 3 



Jackson St. 31, SFA 16 
Nicholls St. 25, Troy St. 17 
Sam Houston 16, Angelo St. 7 



Demon running game skids to halt in 14-0 loss to UTEP 



ptembei 

earn ch 

CHRIS M< 

' -Editor 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

Texas-El Paso's defense liked 
Northwestern's backfield so much 
Saturday night, they decided to 
reside there for most of a telling 
third quarter. 

The UTEP Miners employed a 
fervent blitz in the third quarter to 
record three of its six sacks and 
break a scoreless game open, scoring 
two quick touchdowns. The Miners 
preserved the lead, winning 14-0 to 
improve to 3-1. 

This is their best start since going 
10-3 and reaching the Independence 
Bowl in 1988. The Demons, 
combating offensive malaise, fell to 
1 -2 as they completed a taxing three- 
game road swing to open the season. 

UTEP's defense harried the 
Demon offense all night, checking 
Northwestern to a microscopic 192 
net offensive yards and holding the 
Demons to minus-35 yards for the 
third quarter. UTEP's shutout 
marked their first shutout since 
1988 and the first blanking of the 
Demons since 1987. 

The game wasn"t the only loss 
the Demons suffered Saturday 
night. Northwestern lost 
quarterback Brad Brown to a 
shoulder injury in the third quarter, 
and junior receiver Lawann Latson 
underwent surgery for a mild hernia 



before the game in El Paso. Brown 
could miss the Demons' home opener 
Saturday against East Texas State. 

Despite the loss, the 
Northwestern defense turned in 
another strong performance. The 
Demons allowed UTEP only 254 net 
yards. But it was UTEP's defense 
that gained the most satisfaction. 

"Their defense did a great job in 
the second half against us," said 
Demon head coach Sam Goodwin. 
"We were never able to run between 
the tackles, and as the game wore 
on, we were unable to run outside." 

For the second straight week, 
Northwestern's offensive ineptitude 
presented the opposition with 
enticing, short-distance scoring 
opportunities. For the second 
straight week, the opposition took 
full advantage of it. 

On Northwestern's first 
possession of the second half, UTEP 
linebacker Barron Wortham 
smothered Brown for a 13-yard sack, 
forcing the Demons to punt from 
their own 13-yard line. Ansel 
Littlejohn returned the punt 15 
yards and fumbled, but UTEP 
recovered at the Demon 28 yard 
line. Two plays after a 14-yard 
Littlejohn reverse, Kenny Brown 
scored on a 9-yard slotback reverse 
for UTEP's and the game's first 
touchdown. 

Northwestern's offense went 



backward on its next possession, 
and a failed attempt to gain a first 
down pass on a punt fake put the 
Miners in business at the Demon 8. 
The Demons averted disaster for 
the moment when cornerback Chad 
McDavid intercepted a third-down 
pass in the end zone and ran it back 
to the 8-yard line, but the Demon 
offense was overcome with 
generosity again. 

On third down, a Brown shuffle 
pass was intercepted by UTEP 
defensive tackle Ricky Manning, 
who lumbered the short three yards 
for the Miners' second and final 
touchdown of the game. The extra 
point gave UTEP the 14-0 lead early 
in the third quarter. Once again, 
the Demon offense wasn't 
supporting its defense. 

"I wish I had decided to kickoff to 
start the second half, because I don't 
think they could have crossed the 
50 on our defense," said Goodwin. 
"If we don't give them the ball deep 
on our end, they don't score. Our 
defense played a great game." 

But it was what Northwestern's 
offense couldn't do that led to the 
Demons' swoon. UTEP limited the 
Demon rushing game to a meager 
33 yards. The Miners lassoed 
Northwestern rushers for 63 yards 
in rushing losses. 

"I thought our offense should 



have played a lot better," said 
Goodwin. "We played decently in 
the first half but had a couple of 
critical penalties that stalled drives. 
We had a chance to get the first 
points on the board, and I thought 
that was vital." 

Senior Ail-American linebacker 
Andre Carron once again fueled 



Northwestern's defensive effort. 
Carron registered 1 5 tackles against 
UTEP, leaving him six tackles shy 
of Gary Reason's school career 
record. 

Before leaving the game due to 



Call 

Uvation 
^ousheadfc 

injury. Brown completed seven °^ compe 
10 passes for 77 yards against) #f*' 
Miners. Steve Brown caught | l erin '' 
passes for 56 yards for the Demo °P p0 ™ 
and receiver Victor Robinson haij Co^ e % e ' 
in four receptions for 68 yards 1 - 



Football team ready for ETSU 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

Store away the luggage and forget 
about airline escapades. The 
Northwestern Demons are finally 
coming home. 

After recording a 1 2 record on a 
season-opening three-game road 
swing, the Northwestern Demons 
play their first home game of the 
year Saturday night when they host 
the East Texas State Lions at 7 p.m. 
in Turpin Stadium. 

The Lions are a Division II power, 
ranked fourth in last week's Division 
II polls. 

With an offense searching for 
some answers and an injury list 
slowly escalating, the Demons are 
glad to finally play in the friendly 
confines, where they hope to find 
some answers, some confidence and 
some success. But for now, all that 
abound are questions. 

"We've just got to do some 
evaluating," said Demon head coach 
Sam Goodwin. The key is going to 
be to try and get an inside running 
attack. Right now, it's hard to say 
without evaluating the film, but, 
obviously, we're disappointed with 
our offense in the way we performed 
in that area." 

Against Texas-El Paso Saturday, 
the Demons could only muster 33 
rushing yards and 192 total yards 
offensively. 

To compound matters, the 
Demons lost quarterback Brad 
Brown to a shoulder injury 



sustained in the third quarter and 
multi-purpose performer Lawann 
Latson, who underwent surgery for 
a mild hernia prior to the UTEP 
game. While Latson will definitely 
miss the next four weeks and is 
restricted from running and lower- 
body weight lifting, Brown's status 
for Saturday is still unclear. 

"Brad is going to be day-to-day," 
said Goodwin. "He probably won't 
be able to work out for a few days at 
least, and it probably won't be until 
Wednesday or Thursday before we 
know anything definite." 

Should Brown be sidelined 
Saturday, Goodwin will likely divide 
quarterback duties between red- 
shirt freshman Chris Gilliam and 
sophomore A.J. Maranto. Gilliam 
prefers to run while Maranto likes 
to pass. 

East Texas returns 17 starters 
from a team that finished 10-3 last 
year, 7-0 in the Division II Lone 
Star Conference. Last year against 
the Lions, the Demons had to fend 
off a rally to nip East Texas 24-17 in 
Turpin Stadium after leading 
comfortably 24-7 at halftime. 

The Lions thrive on an 
aggressive 5-2 defense for much of 
their success. A strong secondary 
provides the backbone of the Lion 
defense, thanks to star defensive 
backs Eric Turner and Jimmy 
Hooker. 

"They really come after you, and 
if you run the option, they're going 



to punish your quarterback," 
Goodwin. 



said 



Demon Box 



NSU 
UTEP 








14 




14 



UTEP - K. Brown 9 run (Gillespie kick), 
11:40 3 rd . 

UTEP - Massey 3 interception return 
(Gillespie kick), 7:40 3 rd . 
A - 30,665. 
T-2:20 



First Downs 
Ru9hes-Yards 
Passing 
Comp-Att-Int 
Total Offense 
Return Yards 
Punts-Avg 
Times QB Sacked 
3 rd Down Conver. 
Fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 
Time of Pos. 



NSU 
13 
39-33 
159 
14-27-2 
192 
26 
8-33 
6 

3-16 
0-0 
6-36 

30:59 



UTEP 
16 

48-191 
61 
7-17-1 
252 
82 
6-40 
1 

5-16 
5-2 
5-32 
29:01 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 
RUSHING-NSU, Ridgell 16-45, 
Maranto 3-15, Pierre 2-6, Tappin 1-1, 
Gilliam 4-(-18), B. Brown 13-(-21 ). UTEP, 
Gray 10-54, Miles 9-39, K. Brown 3-24, 
Pixley 7-24, Bailey 8-20, Bogan 4-19, 
Caldwell 3-16, Littlejohn 2-11. 

PASSING-NSU, B. Brown 
7-10-2-77, Gilliam 4-10-0-65, Maranto 
2-6-0-11, Rorex 1-1-0-6. UTEP, Perez 
4-11-1-44, Gray 3-6-0-17. 

RECEIVING-NSU, Robinson 
4-68, S. Brown 5-56, Treadway 2-22, 
Tappin 1-7, Hedrick 1-4, Jones 1-2. 
UTEP, Caldwell 2-32, Bailey 1-14, 
Littlejohn 1-12. 



Offensively, East Texas operates 
out of a Pro I, with quarterback Bob 
Bounds directing the attack. The 
Lions fell last week to Southern 
Arkansas 14-6, but Bounds 
accumulated 221 yards passing 
despite a paltry 12 completions in 
31 attempts. 

"Offensively, they've always had 
pretty good balance," said Goodwin. 
"They've got some quality guys, 
junior college transfers, who are 
playing running back. 

"We have a lot of respect for 
Bounds," said Goodwin. "They lost 
their real good receiver (Gary) 
Compton, but I suspect they'll come 
in with some real good skill people." 

Northwestern's senior Ail- 
American linebacker Andre Carron, 
an Opelousas native, will break Gary 
Reasons' school career tackle record 
with his sixth tackle of the game. 
Carron notched 15 tackles against 
UTEP last week. 



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In actuality 
oinganythinf 
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ead coach Se 
re two advai 
lore receiver 
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lite, they br 
ight men. 
"In the 
nbalanced, i 
ack set, 
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eptf >mber24, 1991 



SPORTS 



Page 9 




ew offense set 

e am develops one-back scheme 



-C UBlSMcGEE 

' ■; Editor 



01 



Call it the "proliferation 
v8 tion." All across the country 
ol)S head football coaches at all 
Dieted seve, com P etition are designing 
rds a i jjt8fr" new ~ onrense8 or * a t --least 

*n cf ughf | V** 0ld SchemeS in un effuFt tu 
or the Den,, ^opponents. 

, , . r llege football s Houston 

Ir 68 yard8' < ' L " ,arS and the National Footbali 



Night 



e $5.00 



f»i<jll (4) 



p, Jritd rice, 



's Houston Oilers have their 
,j C "run-and-shoot" offense to 
IV £fV\ s8 defenses into emotional 
"^J** 1 guina- The Atlanta Falcons have 
H^Ha^J ieir "red gun" offense, a spinoff 01 
I • L*"^ $ run and shoot, and now the 
- M ^western Demons have shifted 
t( j minantly to a one-back offense 
give opponents a new look, 
fhe objectives of the one-back 
fense are manifold. The system 
rimarily is designed to unbalance 
J( j stretch the defense. By taking 
jjan out of the backfield ana 
utting him on the line as an extra 
jjeiver, the Demons unbalance the 
t fensive configuration, gaining a 
j e .tnan advantage to one side and 
utting added pressure on the 
solidary by having to cover an 
dditional receiver. This forces the 
efense to blitz with one less man. 
In actuality, the Demons are not 
oing anything drastically different 
on what they have done in the 
ast. They still do many of the 

I £■ e iey just do it out of a different 
■'■B I innation now. 

"We're doing mostly the same we. 
id out of the I," said Northwestern 
ead coach Sam Goodwin. There 
^ J^^W re two advantages. You put one 
WM^Lm lore receiver on the line a., d 

ressure on the defense. If they 
litz, they bring seven instead ui 
ight men. 

"In the I, you're always 
nbalanced, anyway. In the one- 
ack set, defenses become 
nbalanced with you. They put .... 
itra man on your strength. Now. 

( Amoving a man, we gain a man lo 

he ether side." 
MBBHIB Additionally, Goodwin said the 
PH le-back set puts pressure in that 
ir guys can get into the secondare 
it. 

To decipher the reason Goodwin 
itched to a mostly one-back 
stem, one only needs to look w hei t 
locidwin looked - last year's games 



7* 



ER 



BORTIONS 



you 



against Arkansas State and 
Southwest Texas, two teams that 
used the one-back system to move 
Lhe ball at will against Northwestern 
last year. 

Arkansas State rushed for 270 
yards and held the ball for 34:17, 
while Southwest Texas flattened the 
Demons for378yards rushing. Soon 
lifter, Goodwin became a one-back 
convert. 

'We started to get in the one- 
back offense anyway," said Goodwin 
of his offense. "Southwest Texas 
was so hard to defend. I think they 
were up i n the 400 or 500-yard mark . 

"They got a lot out of their scheme . 
Playing them was the biggest thing. 
I didn't see the advantages in the 
one-back offense until we played 
Southwest Texas." 

The beauty of the one-back 
system to Goodwin is that it 
harmoniously interlocks with his 
offensive personnel. Where the 
offense is most effective with athletic 
skill players, Goodwin possesses a 
joultitude of skill players to make 
his installment work. 

"We are shy on depth," said 
Goodwin. "Guys like (Lawann) 
Latson and (John) Tappin are split 
cut. They can get out in the open 
field more. We've never had a big 
fullback type who can go inside and 
outside except for John Stephens." 

Goodwin, who says his offense's 
primary aim is ball control, says 
progress is coming slowly, but the 
adjustments are being made. 

"We've had some growing pains 
with (the offense)," said Goodwin. 
"We have to just keep working at it. 
The longer we stay in it, the better 
well get." 

One thing is certain to change 
due to the new one-back set — 
recruiting. With the offense 
requiring quick, fast athletes and 
Louisiana seemingly flooded with 
good skill players, Goodwin is 
planning an intensified recruiting 
approach to attracting this type of 
athlete to Northwestern. 

"One good thing about this 
offense is you can use more little, 
quick guys," said Goodwin. "This 
will help in recruiting. Ithinkyoull 
lijid more of those type of players in 
Louisiana." 

And, as Goodwin hopes, maybe 
more of these players will begin to 
find Northwestern. 



Soccer Club loses matches 
earn drops debut outings 





ur 



OUTfl 
ES, Li 



THUIlS- 

vr. 



y JON TERRY 

'Ports Editor 

Northwestern 's new Soccer Club 
iyed their first matches this y .- 
Wkend, losing to McNeese 4-2 last 
day andtoUSL8-ldn Sunday 
»n Saturday's game, pla>ed al 
lisiana College, the Cowboy s took 
early 2-0 lead on two goals in the 
*t 10 minutes. The NSC team 
■ought the score to a tie before 
J" c Neese brought out two mi . 
"ick goals in the last 10minuu- a io 
'toent the victory. 
"We could have won Saturday 
dteam sponsor Don Barker "We 



'ennis team 
tyins opener 
to. home turf 



JON TERRY 

°ts Editor 

NSlTs Lady Demon tennis team 
^ n ed their fall season at home 
, Tuesday with an 8-1 victory 
doling. 

, After having lost seniors rL.rer. 
and Jane Paterson at the end 
' a st season, many had thought 
I ^ the Lady Demons would also 
- 8e some of their punch. But 
* d ne8day's match proved 
ie rwise. 

Karen Bacon and Emily Nichols 
l he team with 6-0, 6-0 victories 
fhe No. 2 and No. 5 eingler- 
^' s 'tions. Katerina Ristic won at 
^° 3 singles 6-2, 6-0, Elvira Spika 
at No. 4 singles 6-3, 6-0, and 
." ar inon Woodson won at No. 6 
'"gles 6-0, 6-2. 
Northwestern also swept the 
t ° u bles competition. Bacon and 
j'^y Sims won the No. 1 match 4- 
y n . 6-1, Ristic and Spika won at 
If 0, 2 doubles 6-0,6-1, and Nichols- 
°°dson won at No. 3 singleE 6-0. 8- 



could have scored four more goals in 
the first half, but missed them by 
just inches." 

USL swamped the Northwestern 
club in Sunday's game, played in 
Lafayette. The Rajin' Cajins 
knocked in four goals in the first 15 
minutes, and extended the lead to 
6-1 by halftime. Antoine Davis 
scored Northwestern's only goal 
with about 12 minutes left in the 
first half. 

The Soccer Club will play their 
next game Saturday against LSU at 
2 p m. on the field behind Watson 
Library. 



Cross country teams 
place third at Tech 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

Northwestern's cross country- 
teams placed third at the Louisiana 
Tech Invitational Saturday. 

The Lady Demons had 47 points 
overall, finishing close behind first 
place Louisiana Tech (38) and 
Northeast (46 ) on the two-mile 
course at the Tech golf course. 
Grambling and Centenary finished 
out the field. 

Northwestern's top runner was 
freshman Maryalyce Walsh, who 
finished the course with a time of 
11:54. Judy Norris joined Walsh in 
the top 10 finishers, coming in sixth 
at 12:53. Other Lady Demon 
finishers were Carla Davison ( 13:03 ) 
at 11th, Marie Gipe (13:05) at 12th, 
Dianne Dubay (13:33) at 16th, Julie 
Martin (13:34) at 17th and Karen 
Current (13:57) at 19th. 

"I thought we looked good in 
spots," said coach Chris Maggio, "but 
we lost concentration in the middle 
of the race. That probably cost us 
first or second place. We were all 
disappointed that we didn't finish 
higher. 

"We are making improvements. 

We just need to learn to concentrate 



more later in the race. The team is 
young, and they'll improve. We 
should look really good for 
conference." 

Northwestern had won their 
previous meet, barely edging out 
Northeast and Tech. 

The men's team also placed third, 
with 103 points, finishing behind 
Louisiana Tech (20) and Northeast 
(39). Tech placed five runners in the 
top ten, and Northeast placed 
another four. The rest of the field 
included Grambling, Centenary, 
and Wiley College. 

Northwestern's lead runner was 
Les McMullen, who placed 1 5th with 
a time of 22:45 for the four-mile 
course. Other Northwestern 
finishers were Robby Bryer (23:36) 
at 20th, Red O'Laughlin (23:37) at 
21st, Danny Broughton (25:02) at 
23rd, and Charles Thompson (25: 19) 
at 24th. 

The Demons and Lady Demons 
will run next this Saturday at the 
USL Invitational in Lafayette. The 
men will run five miles and the 
women will run three in a field thai 
will include UNO, Southeast, USL, 
Lamar and conference rivals 
McNeese and Nicholls State. 




WED. 

Beer Bust 
2 for 1 Bar Drinks all Night Long 

THURS. 

Live Band Flexx 
Ladies Night Beer Bust 

Ladies drink free all night long. 

$100 1st Place to lady noted most instable 

$50 2nd Place Bar Tab 

$25 3rd Place Bar Tab plus 4 tickets to 

Krossfrye on Saturday. 

1 12 price drinks for Guys 

FRI. 

Ladies-No Cover and Drink 
Free till 12:00 Guys-Free 
Draft till 11:00 

ft SAT._ 

Hourly Drinks Specials 




Pol Plants - Flower Arrangements - Fruit Baskets 
Balloons 



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Hours: 
9:00-5.00 Mon.-Fri. 
9:00-12:00 Saturdays 



Injuries hamper 
volleyball squad 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

History does repeat itself, and 
lightning does strike twice. Just ask 
Lady Demon volleyball coach Rickey 
McCalister, who is already 
beginning to see the ghost of seasons 
past in this year's team. 

As in the past two years, the 
Lady Demons have fallen victim to 
the one thing that can stop any 
team, no matter how good. Injuries 
have once again begun to take their 
toll, contributing to their 1-7 record. 

That one Lady Demon victory 
came Tuesday night in a three-game 
thrashing of Grambling, 15-1, 15-3, 
15-0. Shera Dowell and Claire 
Gilmartin each had 11 kills to lead 
the Lady Demons to a .400 attack 
percentage, their highestof the year . 
Senior Sandi Sherrill added six aces. 

On the defensive side, Grambling 
was held to only eight kills for the 
entire match. 

However, the injuries caught up 
to the Northwestern squad when 
they traveled to the Mississippi 
State Tournament . Amy Haslitt 
was already on the sideline at the 
start of the tournament, and during 
the first match, Claire Gilmartin 
went down with a sprained ankle 
that will keep her out for the next 
week. Mississippi State won that 



match, 7-15,5-15,1-15. Kelly Banks 
led the NSU effort with four kills, 
and Claire Gilmartin added three 
blocks before leaving the game. 

On Saturday, the Lady Demons 
started the day with a close loss to 
Samford, 10-15, 10-15, 15-17, and 
continued with a loss to South 
Alabama, 5-15, 4-15, 5-15. Sandi 
Sherrill sat out part of the Samford 
match with an injured back before 
returning against South Alabama, 
and Kelly Banks played both 
matches and continues to practice 
with an injured hand. 

"We are beginning to look a lot 
like last year's team, with the 
injuries," said McCalister, who 
stayed home from Mississippi State 
in order to be with his wife during 
childbirth. "In one week we've lost 
two starters, Amy Haslitt and Claire 
Gilmartin, and have another 
playing." 

One strong note to the weekend 
came when freshman Shera Dowell 
was named to the all-tournament 
team. 

Coach McCalister will hope for 
his players to heal quickly. 
Meanwhile, the team will travel to 
Southern tonight and Southeastern 
Thursday, then to Ruston for the 
Louisiana Tech Tournament this 
weekend. 



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Page 10 



EDITORIAL 



September 24,1^ 



.ptember: 



i\tl Current Sauce 




Lee CorieU 


Van Rodney Reed 


Eric Dutile 

Tina KVkmot 


Editor 


Leigh Flynn 


Elizabeth McDavid Harris 


Maria Jones 
Jason Oldham 


Managing Editor 


Ashley Peterson 

Paul Parker 
Paul Pickering 


Michelle Genre 


News Editor 


Mary Forth 
Jennifer Roy 


Chris McGee 


Amy Staszak 


Sports Editor 


Staff 


Lex Harwell 


Jon Terry 


Tony Means 


Sports Editor 


Photographers 
Russ Harris 


Leonard A. Williams 


Artist 


Lifestyle Editor 


E ben Cook 


Chris Needham 


Todd Martin 


Advertising 
Tom Whitehead 


Business Manager 


Adviser 



EDITORIAL 



The Good, 
the Bad 
and the Ugly 

The Good 

If ever students wanted something to do, 
now is the time. The Student Activities Board has 
been working overtime to bring some big names in 
show business to the Northwestern spotlights. 

The Smothers Brothers, Charmaine Neville, 
and the Kentucky Headhunters will be rocking the 
University from the Coliseum to The Alley. These 
stars will are just the beginning of a hard-working 
activities board that will continue to provide quality 
entertainment for the students and Natchitoches. 



The Bad 

Hey, they're trying. And the competition is 
tough. But when everything comes down to brass 
tacks, the bottom line is that the football team's 
record is still 1-2. If things were close, maybe we 
wouldn't mind as much (or maybe we'd mind even 
more). But 45-14 and 14-0 aren't close. And 33 
rushing yards last week really doesn't say much, 
especially when most of our victories in recent 
years have featured at least 150 to 200 rushing 
yards. So why doesn't the football team just go out 
there and give us something to cheer about. 
Because, even though it isn't fair, we the crowd are 
fickle. And we want something to cheer about. And 
here at home this week is the best place to do it. 

The Ugly 

While the University's parking problem has 
slowly diminished, there is still a major pothole 
problem in many of the lots around Northwestern. 
These holes are occasionally filled in with asphalt 
gravel, but after several days the gravel is pushed 
out. An immediate solution to this problem is an 
overlay, however this would not be economically 
feasible. 

An overlay would cause the closure of the 
lots and more parking problems. These lots are 
being redeveloped under the campus beautification 
plan and will be overlaid and rebuilt as time and 
money permits, but the holes are causing problems 
to automobiles and pedestrian traffic. 

An easy and quick solution would be to 
continue the gravel fill. This would save money 
and time. Still a long-term solution should be 
planned and initiated. 



Current Sauce Editorial Policy 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to P.O. Box 5630, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497 or brought by the Office of Student 
Publications in 225 Kyser Hall. 

Letters to the editor must include the author's classification and 
hometown, as well as a telephone number where the writer can be reached. 
No anonymous letters will be printed. The Current Sauce reserves the 
right to edit all correspondence. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discretion of the editor. 




can 



jjlGH flyn 

ttnior, Alexani 
A s the 19! 

egins, many P 
tudentstheru 

,t uld like tot 
ore mindstude 
I campus life: 
jlore specifi 
\ the sexual a 
|D campus eve 
When I fir 
western, I thou 
, late-night v. 
jlearmyhead.' 
x,wever,Ivow 
f alk anywhere 
A friend of 
[^ouisiana Tec 
jnd we talked 
»ere getting c 
laid, "Be carefi 
jo anywhere I 
jjked why, h 
mow you've h 
rapes up there 
mi my De d in 
student at Te 
assaults that 
aren't even 
ourselves? 
I am awar« 



Jason Oldham 



He has nice hair and a good handshake 



A new candidate for governor 



I hate this time of year — election 
time that is. This is the time of year 
when we must gaze at commercial 
after commercial of political wanna- 
be's promising everything from 
lower taxes to better looking women . 

It's the time of year when flyers 
ofhideous old men with cheesy grins 
on their faces cover the ground more 
plentiful than the autumn leaves. 
Billboards, buttons, balloons and 
babies — every politician is 
pounding the pavement for just one 
more vote. The publicity is a feeble 
and pathetic effort to make the voter 
think Mr. Politician really gives a 
hoot. 

Everything from the Great 
Governor of the fine state of 
Louisiana to the chief assistant of 
the cleaning lady on the fourth floor 
has to be elected. A job becomes 
open, and Louisiana has an election. 
This would not be such a problem if 
only one person ran for each of these 
illustrious offices. But no, we have 
to sit through hours of ever so 
creative campaign commercials 
from now until November. Then, if 
we're lucky, there will be a few 



runoffs, as if they did not beat their 
pointless points into the ground the 
first time. 

Let's take the governor's race, 
for example. What a fine crop of 
individuals we have here. Deciding 
who to vote for on this one is like 



to parties and parades and give 
funny press conferences once a week . 

First, I would have to get my hair 
done. It would be my slogan. "Vote 
for Jason, he's got the best hairdo in 
politics," or better yet, "I may not 
know anything, but at least I have 



Guest 

Chris 

The 



There a 
wonders in th 
are not too ha 
where to look, 
also offers at v; 
and fragment 
the human mi 
you wondering 
or perhaps th 
aickness. The 
m the second 
Jnion is on 
atrocities. If 
tank your lu 
like the food ii 
wen it, you'n 
*hat inspired 
IB responsib 
Petition for tl 
The mar 
"one other 



"We'll pay our teachers more. While we are at it, 

9 

we might as well balance the budget, 
feed the hungry, and finish 1-49" 



Dr. Alost look good in a truck thi 
goes boom? 

Second, I would have to attai 
those certain TV commercials that 
find offensive. I pledge to eliminal Pf^^ 1 p r 
all television advertisement itj 
concerning feminine hygietjj 
products. I hate those things. R 
embarrassing. Frankly, I don't cai 
that the darn thing has wings 



should be unconstitutional for a tut Human p , 
to have to sit through one of th« te foo( 
commercials with a lady around 
Those are enough promises 
one term in office. I would hate ! > 



choosing which belt your dad was 
going to whip you with when you 
were little. Whether you pick the 
short wimpy one or big scary one, 
they all burn your butt the same. 

So, maybe it's time I quit whining 
and do something about it. I could 
run for governor. I'd hire a staff of 
competent people to do all the boring 
stuff, like legislation, taxes and 
those other governor things. I'd go 



nice hair." Don't laugh. You know 
you've heard worse, and they were 
serious. 

The meat of my campaign would 
be the campaign promises 111 make. 
First, 111 make a law declaring all of 
those stupid-looking trucks illegal 
in Louisiana. We will confiscate all 
those bright colored trucks that are 
three inches off the ground and make 
state vehicles out of them. Wouldn't 



its fairly nove 
bo lame it' 
Hr. Alost cor 
California, I 
actually 



*°od later 
"tame the 



Readers' Forum 



Tell the Sauce your opinion 



The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
that this feature could be misused for the sole purpose of causing 
embarrassment and pain to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the feature to degenerate to the 
level of a gossip line nor well we allow it to become a political battle 
ground. Complaints and criticisms should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibility to hold the line on this matter, and we 
have determined that each call we receive will be formally evaluated 
by an editorial committee composed of the editorial •staff. No "one" 
individual' will edftithe calls. 



We will evaluate the calls for potential to inspire improvement 
any given area and then make a decision whether or not to publish 
Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an independ e 
followup on the matter. 

To leave a message, just call our number at 357-5096 betwee" 
p.m. and 12 p.m. on weekdays and leave your name, classificat' 011 
major, and a brief message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers who requested 
opportunity to voice comments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers, 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the caretak 6 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



People. Dr. i 
Student Act 
*arg e of tl 
get earned away. No one else 1* thousand dol 

Vote for Jason. I have nice hi „ 
I like parades and parties, and 
have a good handshake. I'll do fl ^ — 
best to keep my promises, and I' .. 
sure my staff can do a good J 1 
stopping unemployment * c 
illiteracy. Well pay our teach* 1 
more. While we are at it, we i 
as well balance the budget, feed^ l 
hungry, and finish Interstate 49- 
Daddy, I don't care which W 
you use, just whip me and 




cc 



jer 



2 4,„W * mber24 - 1991 



OPINION 



Page 11 




Writer warns 
campus unsafe 



fin 




MlGH FLYNN 

^or, Alexandria 
^ s the 1991-92 school year 
^gjns, many people will be telling 
tudents the rules and regulations. 
ff0 uld like to take this opportunity 
oremirid students of another aspect 
^campus life: safety. 

More specifically, I am referring 
„ the sexual assaults which occur 
in campus every semester. 

When I first came to North- 
western, I thought nothing of taking 
j late-night walk by the lake to 
■lear my head. This past Christmas, 
jowever , I vowed that I would never 
Kalk anywhere alone again at night. 

A friend of mine who goes to 
[xjuisiana Tech called my house, 
md we talked for a while. As we 
nere getting off the telephone, he 
said, "Be careful at school and don't 
jo anywhere by yourself." When I 
jjlsed why, his response was,. ."I 
know you've heard about the three 
rapes up there, haven't you?" I sat 
on my bed in shock. Why had a 
student at Tech heard about the 
assaults that occur here when we 
aren't even informed of them 
ourselves? 
I am aware of the fact that the 



or 



i truck thi 

r e to attac 
rcialsthai 
jo eliminal 
tisemenl 
e hygiei 
things. 11 



Current Sauce has attempted to 
obtain reports from the campus 
Sscurity, and the requests were 
denied. Do we not, as students, have 
the right to know how safe our school 
is? By not informing students of the 
risks they take, isn't the school in 
some way responsible? In the 
literature describing the beautiful 
campus and the nice peaceful 
Chaplain's Lake, the minute point 
that we had at least three sexual 
assaults on female students last year 
seems to be forgotten. 

What should we do about the 
lack of information? It's obvious 
that other campuses have different 
regulations about such things. 
Perhaps we could again ask campus 
security's help in making the 
information available to the public 
or at least to the press. Nothing will 
work unless we cooperate. Students 
should be informed of the dangers 
which are present both during the 
night and daylight hours. 

We've all been told to walk in 
well-lit areas, to lock our doors and 
not to sneak people into the dorm, 
but many people do not realize that 
even a date with "a good friend' 
could end differently than expected. 



Guest Column 

Chris Gleason 



The Demon from Hell 



There are many natural 
wonders in the world. Scenic spots 
are not too hard to find if you know 
where to look. Conversely, our world 
also offers at various times glimpses 
ind fragments of the dark side of 
the human mind. Things that leave 
you wondering if they have a purpose 
or perhaps they exist to facilitate 
sickness. The giant wooden demon 
on the second floor of the Student 
Union is one of these natural 
atrocities. If you haven't seen it, 
thank your lucky stars and learn to 
like the food in Iberville. If you have 
Ken it, you're probably wondering 
*hat inspired this creation and who 
» responsible (no, we will not 
Petition for their arrest). 

The man behind the plan is 
n °ne other than our creative 
President, Dr. Alost. The idea itself 
|ts fairly novel, but the literal work 
18 so lame it's offensive. Anyway, 
Most contacted a company in 



i don't ca P. lif . „ *" , " v t : . 

^antorrua, Burlwood Industries, 



wings, 
lalforafflj 
>ne of th« 
y around 
romises « 
>uld hate! 
ne else 
r e nice M 
"ties, and 
s. I'll do 
les, and v 
a good 
Dent i 
ur teach* 
t, we 
ret, feedd 
rstate 49- 
which W 
and ge { 



ivemen' 

publish' 1 

depend 

betwee" 
sificatq 

luested 
J 



srs 



areta* 



"tot actually does this for a living. 
Human perception would lead one 
"> think food is scarce for these 
People. Dr. Alost put Carl Henry, 
indent Activities Director, in 
charge of the operation. Five 
"tousand dollars and over a ton of 
*°od later the Student Union 
5c ame the sole possessor of a 



Goliath-sized constipated-looking 
wooden Demon. What a bargain! 

There are some interesting 
trivialities about the Demon. The 
tree used in the sculpture was 
estimated to be 800 years old. The 
Demon, one solid piece of wood, 
ended up weighing approximately 
2500 pounds. 

After these wondrous bits of 
folklore are known one can begin to 
actually appraise the workmanship. 
I think it looks like something 
Edward Scissorhands would've done 
on a serious LSD trip. For a Demon 
this thing looks awfully timid. 

Mr. Henry did mention that 
they didn't want him too look too 
menacing. Well, they surely don't 
have to worry about that. The shoes 
on this thing, I thjnk they were 
supposed to be Nike's, but Michael 
Jordan will undoubtedly sue if he 
sees how bad they look. In a nutshell 
the thing is awful, awful, and more 
awful. 

The best critique of this object 
is this-the sculptor/artist/ 
abstractionist/con artist-didn't leave 
his name. He crept off like a thief, 
faultless but five thousand dollars 
richer. Sure this conglomerate of 
wood and paint was done by a group 
of people, but someone should step 
up like a man and take the blame. 



Guest Column 

Ronald Campbell 



Dealing with Louisiana's rising 
automobile insurance costs 



There is a cry rising in the throat 
of the masses in Louisiana, and in 
the Natchitoches area itself, to which 
there must soon be an answer. That 
cry is from the working people who 
are asking how they can possibly 
keep up with the rising cost of 
automobile insurance. 

Insurance is rising at a rate far 
greater than their income. And the 
crux of the problem is here, in our 
own state. And it is here that the 
solution, at least the beginnings of a 
solution, must be born. 

In order to find the solution to 
any problem, one must first find its 
cause. The cause of this problem is 
grossly misunderstood. When 
citizens are asked the root of this 
problem^ the overwhelming 
consensus is always that it is the 
fault of the insurance companies, 
who are simply trying to make as 
much money as the law allows, 
without any regard to the hardships 
through which they are putting their 
patrons. 

Most uninformed citizens, and 



the vast majority are uniformed in 
this matter, want to simply force 
insurance companies to lower their 
premiums to an acceptable level. 
"Acceptable" is the key word here. 
To whom will the premiums be 
acceptable? They will be acceptable 
to the consumer. They will most 
assuredly not be acceptable to the 
insurance companies. Thus, this 
solution is simply not acceptable. 

It is not acceptable because 
insurance companies have no legal 
or moral obligation to lose money. 
In other words, they are under no 
obligation, legal or otherwise, to 
remain in Louisiana if they are not 
turning a profit. The reason they 
are not earning a profit is the true 
cause of the overall problem. That 
reason is the legal system of this 
state. 

It is not insurance companies 
who are making as much money as 
possible without regard to its clients. 
It is attorneys. True, most attorneys 
work on a contingency basis, 
meaning that their clients do not 
have to pay them anything unless a 



settlement is reached, but they are 
hurting their clients indirectly. They 
are getting them by causing their 
insurance premiums to skyrocket. 
The legal system allows some of the 
most ludicrous settlements 
imaginable, usually for outrageous 
sums of money. 

It is not individuals against 
whom these fines are levied but the 
insurance companies. Each time 
one of these ridiculous lawsuits is 
filed (of course, not all lawsuits are 
ridiculous), it directly affects 
insurance premiums. You may rest 
assured that insurance companies 
will not go bankrupt in order to line 
the pockets of the entire legal 
system. Before companies allow 
bankruptcy to become an 
alternative, they will simply pull 
out of the state and withdraw to 
states where they can make the 
profit which is necessary for them 
to keep their doors open. 

So what is the solution? The 
laws must be changed so that a cap 
can be placed on the amount 



awardable in frivolous lawsuits. 
However, this will be difficult since 
those who make the laws are the 
very lawyers who are getting rich 
from these lawsuits when the 
Louisiana legislature is not in 
session. 

Another solution would be to do 
away with contingency fees. If people 
had to pay for their legal counsel out 
of their own pockets, not knowing if 
they are going to get a settlement, 
they would be greatly deterred from 
filing suit for frivolous claims. 

Another deterrent would be to 
make a person who files a suit and 
loses, pay the court costs. At present, 
there is not monetary reason for 
someone not to file a lawsuit, 
legitimate or not. 

Whether or not the afore- 
mentioned solutions are imple- 
mented remains to be seen. But, the 
alternative is clear — as long as 
insurance companies are charged 
with financing the swelling legal 
industry exorbitantly, then you will 
be charged with financing insurance 
companies exorbitantly. 



Guest Column 

Maria Jones 



Black or White: we are the same 



Do you know the difference 
between a minority and a majority? 
The difference is not in what race, 
sex, or age we are, but in the way we 
look at ourselves. 

I have often wondered why 
people can't just be people. Why do 
we only accept those who are like us , 
and mistrust and reject those who 
are different? 

I recently had a black student 
tell me that some other blacks feel 
that whites aren't sincere when they 
try to ue friends. That statement 
bothered me because when I reach 
out to people, I don't reach out 
because of color or any other outward 
appearance. But, I'm sure many 
white students are apprehensive 
about becoming friendly with black 
students because they don't 
understand them either. 

The problem isn't black or white. 
We tend to judge people and react to 
them by a personal experience we 
have with one person of that group, 
the things our parents tell us about 
them, or what ojur peers dictate. 



Several years ago I worked for a 
department store in New Orleans 
in a large office in which the billing 
was done by several women. We 
would talk as we worked, and one 
day we started discussing our 
different heritages. 

Each of us in turn gave an account 
of our ancestors, and we all felt 
proud of from where they came. We 
were also all white. 

The janitor was in the office 
working on something at the time, 
and he just listened quietly. He was 
an old black man who had worked 
there for many years, and everyone 
liked him. Finally, after the last 
billing clerk gave her family 
background, he spoke up. He said 
something that made each of us 
realize a very important truth. All 
he said was, "I am an American. My 
ancestors were brought here from 
Africa, but, I am an American." 

1 was brought up by parents who 
didn't teach me prejudice. I always 
thought everyone was the same and 
should be treated equally, so. when 



I came in contact with others who 
were prejudiced, it disturbed me. I 
tried to understand why people are 
so quick to hate someone just 
because they are different. 

The conclusion I reached was 
most people aren't happy with who 
they are. People who are insecure 
many times think if they put othei 
people or other groups of people 
down they will be big 
Unfortunately, that thinking only 
causes retaliation. 

We can look at ourselves as pari 
of a crowd and feel insecure anc 
useless or we can look at ourselves 
the way God made us as unique 
individuals with individual talents 
to share with everyone. 

I'm not talking about being, 
conceited and thinking we are better 
than others, but looking at ourselves 
as equal to everyone with valuable 
contributions to make to society. 

Likewise, if we look at others as 
unique with special talents we can 
gain from their friendship, we will 
be less likely to look for faults. 

My husband made an interesting 



observation while we were 
discussing this. He said, "The 
problem is that some of the students 
at Northwestern see themselves as 
<black NSU students' or 'white NSU 
students' when they should see 
themselves as NSU students who 
just happen to be black or white or 
oriental or whatever." 

The way we are packaged isn't 
important, it's what the package 
contains. What we have inside and 
how much we want to give to those 
around us will make a difference. 

There is a direct proportion in 
what we give and what we get in 
return. If you want respect you 
must be willing to treat others with 
respect; if you want friends then 
you must show others that you can 
be a friend; and if vou want trust 

you must prove yourself 

trustworthy. 

Don't be afraid to reach out to 

people who are different or whom 

you don't understand. Some may 

not respond, but most people will. 

Chances are they are just as afraid 

as you are. 







Our dedication to see to 
it that Northwestern 
Sports is covered 
completely has led us to 

create 



SUP 

SPORTS 





- This Fall in the - 

Current Sauce 



THERE'S MORE 

WAYS THAN 
ONE TO VOICE 
YOUR OPINION. 

On a soapbox 
or 
in the 
Current Sauce 

Check the Editoral page and 
the Opinion page each week 
to read students' opinions 
about issues facing 
Northwestern and you. 

Every Week 
in the 



Current Sauce 



Page 12 



LIFESTYLE 



September 24, 




Can you catch a rising star? 



The Studefip 
Activiti* 
Board willl 
you catch 01 
six times th 
semester. 




By LEONARD A. WILLIAMS 

Lifestyle Editor 

Ordinary people displaying their 
talents to a ready-to-be-entertained 
audience is the latest trend in 
entertainment. Following a national 
lead, Northwestern's Student 
Activities Board has initiated a show 
of its own. 

The NSU-SAB Star Search 
features talented individuals that 
normally can be found walking to 
and from class. These same people 
are signing up to strut their stuff for 
two minutes and 50 seconds in front 
of their peers and judges, who are 
selected by the SAB . 

The first Star Search was held on 
Sept. 19 in The Alley. Based on 
attendance and applause, it was a 
success. 

SAB advisor, Carl Henry said 



that the success of this first Star 
Search was "a result of the SAB 
trying to meet the needs of the 
diverse student population. 

"The event allows the talented 
students on campus a way to express 
themselves and possibly win some 
money," said Henry. 

With several contestants in each 
event, the program satisfied a 
standing-room-only crowd in the 
Alley last Thursday. 

"Outcome and attendance were 
greater than I had expected. I believe 
that everyone enjoyed themselves," 
said Tracie Najolia, representative- 
at-large chairwoman. 

The male vocalists category 
showcased three students talents 
that had the audience participating, 
and in some cases, singing along 
with the performer. Willie Houston, 



a sophomore from Shreveport, won 
that category. 

Tap dancing and fiddle-playing 
were the subjects of the open 
competition. Chris Knighton, a 
freshman from Shreveport, played 
the fiddle with a twist. She twisted 
her body, yet still remained in 
control of the instrument. 

Freshman Jefferey Williams 
tapped and clapped to the sounds of 
Billy Ocean's "Get Outa My 
Dreams." 

"I was really pleased with 
everyone's performance. However, 
I would love to see more diversity in 
the open catagory," said Najolia. 

The final category was the female 
vocalists' competition. Four ladies 
competed in this event. Several 
students in the audience said the 
competition was "very stiff." 



UPER 



ei 



Stephanie Wong-Ortiz, a 
from Campti, won the competj 
with her vocal performance. 

Each winner walked awayi 
a $30 prize, and an invitation^ 
next Star Search, which will be! 
on Thursday, Oct. 3 in The AI 

There will be four 
preliminary competitions andal 
round this semester. The SAB 
be taking applications in the StJ 
Union office at their partiJ 
times. 

By winning two round! 
competition, contestants beJ 
eligible for the final competitii 
December. 

The final winners will be a w J 
a $100 prize, and a videotaa 
their perfrormance will be sei 
the National Star Search in] 
Angeles. 





When you can 
Catch a Star: 



October 3 
October 14 
October 24 
November 14 
November 24 



NOHTIIWKSTKHN 
STUDENT 
ACTIVITII 
BOARD 



Willie Houston (right) won the Male 
Vocalist competetion and Stephanie Wong 
Ortiz (far left) took the honors in the Female 
Vocalist competetion at the SAB's first Star 
Search. 




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kts Editor 
The recon 
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'ay. 
With 2:04 
■^Wthwester! 
win over 
!>8ht, Andre 
kry Reason 
^rd by dri 
!* Bounds 
"an turf for 
* a sonebig f 
*t Plays. Bi 
Barron, Non 
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I'm very 
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^Igndar 
^HlPusC 
^itorials^ 
^ e styie_ 

5wnjons_ 
S^ctionc 
^PerSp C 

*L Studen 

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UPER SPORTS 

pemons Win Home 
Opener, page 5 





I Editorial 

Inside Newspapers, 
page 6 



Lifestyle 

Smothers Brothers- 



Harry Connick, page 8 




Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

October 1, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 9 



Northwestern State University 



ig-Ortiz, a 
l the competj 
•formance. 
alked away 
l invitation tg 
which will 
;. 3 in The Al 
be four 
ititionsandal 
jer. The SAB 
onsintheStJ 
their parti 

two ro 
testants bed 
al competitJ 

rswillbeawi 
d a videotaj 
:e will be 
ir Search it 



* DEMON RECORD BREAKER 




8 95 




With 2 minutes left in the first half, Andre Carron broke Gary Reasons school record of 50 tackles. Above, Coach Sam Goodwin 
presents Carron with the game ball. 

Linebacker tops Reasons 

Carron breaks record 



i CHRIS McGEE 
'Ports Editor 

The record finally fell Saturday 
fcht, and in a most appropriate 
lay. 

. With 2:04 left in the first half of 
A forthwestern's home-opening 26- 
I win over East Texas Saturday 
■"iht, Andre Carron tore asunder 
"•ry Reasons' school career tackle 
^rd by driving Lion quarterback 
Bounds into the Turpin Sta- 
fcum turf for a seven-yard sack. It 
J^one big play in a game of many 
?8 Plays. But it was one play that 
^ron, Northwestern's consensus 
^sion I-AA All-American line- 
^ber , had been awaiting for a long 
ie. 

. "I'm very excited," said Carron 
the game. "I've been trying tc 



do it all last season and all this 
season. I worked real hard, and 
tonight I had to." 

Although the record fell, it didn't 
fall as soon as most people expected. 
In fact, Carron, who needed just 
four tackles to break the record, 
finished with just 10 tackles for the 
game, a yeoman's effort for most 
linebackers but a slight letdown by 
Carron's standards. Carron entered 
the game with 46 tackles, an aver- 
age of just over 15 per game. 

Part of the reason for the late 
juncture at which Carron arrived at 
the milestone is that East Texas 
vigilantly avoided running to 
Carron's side, which oftentimes 
forced the Opelousas native to shed 
blockers as he pursued the ball to 
the other side of the field. 

"East Texas kept running to the 



other side, to the weak side, and 1 
just had to get by the block and get 
over there," said Carron. "By the 
time I got over there, they already 
had the tackle." 

When Carron spilled Bounds for 
the record, the game was briefly 
halted, and Demon coach Sam 
Goodwin presented his defensive 
gladiator with the game ball. But 
afterward, Carron expressed relief 
that the record is finally out of the 
way. 

"I'm glad it's over with," said 
Carron. "Everybody was down here 
asking me when I'm going to break 
the record. Now, I can focus on 
North Texas and just play football; 

And focus on rendering running 
backs and quarterbacks terror- 
stricken. 



INVESTIGATION 



SGA election 
challenged today 

Court to hear appeal of homecoming court nominee 

Part one in a series of articles on the contested election of the Northwestern Homecoming Court 



By VAN REED 

Editor 

The Student Government 
Association's election for Home- 
coming court will be challenged 
today in a 3:30 
p.m. Supreme 
Court hearing 
in the SGA 
meeting room. 
The court will 
meet to hear 
the appeal of 
Henrietta 
Collins, a nomi- 
nee for Home- 
coming Court. 
Collins is 

arguing that Beth Gowland, vice 
president of SGA, worked around 
the polls and the vote counting, 
even though she was on the ballot 
for Homecoming and Miss NSU. 



"We'll base our 



decision on what is 




Collins 



presented to us." 

"Henrietta (Jollms is contest- 
ing the election on the grounds 
that Beth Gowland was serving on 
the Election Board while also be- 
ing on ballot," said Scott Andrews, 
SGA president. 

According to Andrews, the 
court met Friday to determine if 
the nominee's case should be heard 
for an appeal. The justices decided 
to listen to Collins' appeal. Today, 
they must decide if her challenge is 
"legitimate" and find a solution to 
her case. 

"We will hear both sides of the 
story. All that we've heard has 



been hearsay," said Morgan 
Collins, a supreme court justice. 
"We just want to be fair and hear 
both sides." 

The justice said Collins must 
present her case before a board of 
justices who will weigh the evi- 
dence and base their decision on 
the testimony from both Collins 
and Gowland. 
he said. 

Andrews said the outcome of 
the Collins' challenge is unpredict- 
able. The court could decide to 
revote on the Homecoming Court, 
to revote on the entire ballot or the 
court could deny her request. 

"There are so many alterna- 
tives to look at," said Andrews. 
"That's for the Supreme Court to 
decide." 

Collins was not available for 
comment at press time. 



Brown, Collins in run-off 

Davis wins Miss NSU, 
Mr. NSU undecided 



By TINA M. FORET and 
AMY STASZAK 

Staff Writers 

Linda Davis, a senior from Alex- 
andria, was elected Miss NSU last 
week in the Student Government 
Association's run-off election. 

"I feel very honored to be elected 
as. Miss NSU, especially being 
elected by my peers," said Davis. "I 
was surprised. 
All the others 
were quite de- 
serving, and I 
would have 
been just as 
happy if one of 
them had been 
elected. I 
would also like 
to thank every- 
one for their 
support." 
Davis and her sister, Lola, were 




together when she heard that she 
had been elected Miss NSU. She 
called and shared the news with her 
parents who were "excited and proud; 
of her," she said. 

An education major, Davis is cur- 
rently serving as president of Stu- 
dent Activities Board. She is also a 
member of Students Come First 
Roundtable and Phi Mu sorority. In 
the fall of 1990, she was elected 
Homecoming Queen. 

After graduating from North- 
western, Davis plans to attend 
graduate school. Upon completion 
of graduate school, she would like to 
teach for a few years and then go 
into counseling/guidance. 

"I definitely want to promote 
NSU as the place to be," said Davis. 

Mr. and Miss NSU will speak at 
both the fall and spring gradua- 
tions. The pair will also ride in the 
annual Natchitoches Christmas 



parade. 

Students may vote in the run-off 
election for Mr. NSU between Brad 
Brown and Morgan Collins on 
Wednesday in the Student Union 
and on Thursday in Iberville Caf- 
eteria. 

According to Ray Krull, senior 
SGA senator, approximately 700 
students voted in the last election. 
However, he said, as the participa- 
tion dwindles from election to elec- 
tion, the percentage of female fresh- 
men voters remains consistent. 

"If the current trend holds, Mr. 
NSU will be decided in Iberville by 
the freshmen," said Krull. 

According to Krull, the fresh- 
men voters are very decisive be- 
cause of their numbers. 

"The students need to continue 
to vote and push their friends to 
vote because this last election is the 
most important," said Krull. 



Jnside J 


^!endar 


2 


^^^Hlpus Connection 


3 


porials 


6 


^!styie_ 


8 


^in Brief 


2 


pinions 


7 


<Sctipn Coverage 


1 


^PerSports 


5 


^ers to the Editor 


7 


Student Newspaper 
^ 0r thwestern State University 
^ c hitoches, Louisiana 






357-5456 



Fly-by salutes Holland at Military Night 



By JENNIFER ROY 

Staff Writer 

This year's annual Mibtary Ap- 
preciation Night paid tribute to the 
participants of Desert Storm dur- 
ing Northwestern's football game 
against East Texas on Sept. 28. 

The game was dedicated to the 
memory of Lt. Col. Donnie Holland, 
a 1970 graduate of Northwestern 
who died in Desert Storm. 

During the ceremony, all war 
veterans from Northwestern and 
the more than 200 Northwestern 
students who participated in Op- 
eration Desert Storm were recog- 
nized. 

Along with a patriotic music 
performance by the Spirit of North- 
western Marching Band, the activi- 
ties featured the appearance of an 
Apache helicopter, a Huey helicop- 



ter and a KC-10 tanker that was 
used in Desert Storm. 

The celebration also included a 
fly-by of F-15E fighters from 
Holland's 335th Tactical Fighter 
Squadron stationed at Seymour- 
Johnson Air Force Base in North 
Carolina, who performed the miss- 
ing man formation under the lead of 
Holland's commanding officer. 

According to Elise James, direc- 
tor of External Affairs at North- 
western, "When the notice was 
posted at the base about the fly-by, 
nearly 35 pilots volunteered." 

A plaque was presented by Dr. 
Robert Alost, Northwestern's presi- 
dent, to Holland's parents. The in- 
scription stated: "In grateful recog- 
nition of Lt. Col. Donnie Holland for 
distinguished service and the sacri- 
fice of his life for peace and freedom. 
■ Please see Holland, p. 3 




Dr. Robert Alost (right) presents a plaque to the family of Lt. Col. Donnie Holland. 



Page 2 

Calendar 
of Events 



today 

Intramural Flag Football 

New Mexico Group Art 
Exhibit opens in Orville 
Hanchey Art Gallery 

4 p.m. 

Faculty Showcase Concert, 

Ma^ale Recital Hal! of the A. A. 
Fredericks Center for Creative 
and Performing Arts 

7 p.m. 

SAb Movie Night features 
Sleeping With the Enemy in The 
Alley 



WEDNESDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 

7 p.m. 

Clyde Holloway, candidate 
for Governor Math Auditorium 
Kyser Hall 

8 p.m. 

Fifth Avenue in The Alley 



THURSDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 

7 p.m. 

Star Search in The Alley 
FRIDAY 

18th ROTC Demon Ranger 
Competition 

SATURDAY 

7 p.m. 

Lady Demon Volleyball 

The Demons play Texas Arling- 
ton in Prather Coliseum. 

MONDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 



October 



News In Brief 



■ Students exhibit artwork 

The Northwestern 
Department of Creative and 
Performing Arts' annual New 
Mexico Group Art Exhibition is 
on display today through Oct. 25 
in the Orville Hanchey Art 
Gallery. 

The exhibition consists of the 
works of 15 artists who 
accompanied NSU professor of art 
Dr. Bill Bryant to Ghost Ranch, 
N.M. While in New Mexico, the 
students worked primarily in 
watercolor, painting one of the 
most scenic areas in the 
Southwest. 

According to Bryant, the 
exhibition will also include some 
pastels and one oil painting. 

The group consisted of one 
undergraduate student, several 
graduate students and older 
adults from Louisiana and Texas. 

A reception for the artists 
will bo held on Sunday, from 2-4 
p.m. in the Gallery. The public is 
invited to attend. 

■ NSU professor publishes 
paper 

A paper by Dr. Subhash 
Durlabjhi, associate professor of 
business at Northwestern, has 
been accepted for publication. 

The paper, "Organizational 
Philosophies of Japanese 
Companies in the U.S.A." will be 
published in "The International 
Journal of Value Based 
Management," a journal 
published at Iona College in New 
Rochelle, N.Y. 

Durlabjhi studied Japanese- 
owned companies that did 
business in the United States. 
These companies appeared to put 
a great deal of emphasis on 
organizational philosophies. 

1 hi concluded that these 
companies attempted to duplicate 
organizational philosophies that 
were pursued in Japan, and those 
philosophies tended to emphasize 
teamwork. 

■ ROTC to host trainjng 
weekend 

The Northwestern ROTC 
program will sponsor the 12th 




Dr. Bruce (right) clarinetist and professor of music, and Charles Vinson, 
pianist and assistant professor of music, will perform in the faculty recital. 



annual Demon Field Training 
Exercises Thursday through 
Saturday at the NSU Obstacle 
Course on La. Highway 6 North 
bypass. 

Students from Louisiana and 
Texas will receive training in land 
navigation, first aid, wilderness 
survival technique, construction of 
rope bridges and obstacle training, 
according to Lt. Col. John Foster, 
commander of NSU's ROTC 
program. 

Over 200 students are 
expected to take part in the three- 
day exercise. 

■ Fine Arts Faculty 
Displays Talent 

Faculty members from 
Northwestern 's Department of 
Creative and Performing Arts will 
perform in a faculty showcase 
concert today at 4 p.m. in the 
Magale Recital Hall of the A.A. 
Fredericks Center for Creative and 
Performing Arts. 

"The purpose of our recital is 
to show off the talents of our 
performing arts faculty to music, 
dance, and art students," said 
concert organizer Tony Smith, an 
associate professor of music at 
NSU. "We've put a special 



emphasis on performances by new 
faculty for this concert since we 
have several faculty positions in 
the Department of Creative and 
Performing Arts." 

New faculty members 
appearing in the concert will 
include vocalist Barbara Burdick, 
pianist Charles Vinson and 
percussionist Doran Bugg. 

Veteran faculty members to 
perform include clarinetist Dr. 
Bruce Bullock, trumpet professor 
Galindo Rodriguez and pianist 
Mary Grace Galvan. Rodriguez 
will be featured with other 
members of the NSU Brass 
Quintet. 

Trombonist Richard Stalling, 
a graduate assistant music theory 
instructor at NSU, will present a 
trombone work he composed in 
1985. 

The concert is free and open to 
the public. For more information, 
contact the NSU Department of 
Creative and Performing Arts at 
357-4522. 

■ Conference to focus on 
gifted students 

The Fifth Annual Academic 
Enrichment Conference for gifted 
and talented students will be held 



at Northwestern this Friday and 
Saturday. 

The conference is sponsored 
by the Louisiana Scholars' College 
at Northwestern State University, 
the Louisiana School for Math, 
Science, and the Arts, and the 
Association for Gifted and 
Talented Students. 

Friday's workshop is open to 
parents, teachers and interested 
university students. 

Dr. Mary Meeker, clinical 
psychologist and internationally 
noted expert on gifted children, 
will present Friday's workshop, as 
well as one Saturday for the 
parents of gifted children. 

A variety of activities is 
planned on Saturday from 8 a.m. 
until noon. The workshop for 
parents will be held from 8:30 a.m. 
until 11:45 a.m. Gifted and 
talented students from elementary 
and secondary schools will work 
with faculty from the Louisiana 
School and Scholars' College. 

The deadline to register is 
Wednesday. For more 
information, contact the 
Association of Gifted and Talented 
Students at 357-4572. 

■ Midterm grades to be 
distributed Oct. 24-25 

This fall's midterm grades will 
be distributed to students in 
several different ways. 

Midterm grades for all 
Natchitoches campus dormitory 
students will be mailed to their 
Northwestern post office boxes by 
Oct. 25. 

All Natchitoches campus non- 
dormitory students can pick up 
their midterm grades in the 
Students Union Ballroom from 
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 24-25, 
1991. Midterm grades will not be 
available to students after Oct. 25. 

Students attending the 
Shreveport Nursing School 
campus, England Air Force Base 
campus and the Fort Polk campus 
should contact those campuses to 
find out the schedule for picking 
up midterm grades. 

Contact Lillie Bell, of the 
Registrar's Office, at 357-6171 
with any questions. 




_____ j 

Current 
Sauce 



P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State UniverajK 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 7149] 

(UPS 140 - 660) 



How to reach the Sauc* 

To subscribe to The Sauc« 

Subscriptions 357-5^ 



To place an ad 

Local ads 
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357-545 
357-52, 



Question about billing 

Sales Manager 357-5^ 
Business Manager 357-52, 

To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 357-545 

Editor 357-509! 

Editorial/Opinion 357-50) 

Lifestyles 357-545; 

News 357-54j 

Sports 357-545 



The Current Sauce is located) 
the Office of Student Publications! 
225 Kyser Hall. 

The Current Sauce is publish 
every week during the fall by % 
students of Northwestern State Uni 
versity of Louisiana. It is not assoo 
ated with any of the university's^ 
partments and is financed indep* 
dently. 

The deadline for all adverti* 
merits is 5 p.m. the Thursday 

fore publication. 

Inclusion of any and all mate 
rial is left, to the discretion of Hi 
editor. 

The Current Sauce will notli 
printed on November 26, 1991 duet 
the university's Thanksgiving Hoi 
day. 

The Current Sauce is enteredd 
second-class mail at Natchitocha 
LA. 

Postmaster: send address changes to 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 
6 Current Sauce 



pcta B 

Beta 



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^tober 1, 1991 



NEWS 



Page 3 



CAMPUS CONNECTIONS 



e news 



action 



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I Sauce is locate^ 
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ina. Itisnotasaog 
the university's df 
3 financed indepen 



le for all adverti* 
the Thursday k 



' any and all matt 
e discretion of tit 



t Sauce will not It 
nber26, 1991 duel 
Thanksgiving Hot 



il at Natch itocte 



d address changes lo 
'.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
es, LA 71497. 
ent Sauce 



jj e ta Beta Beta 

Beta Beta Beta will hold a meet- 
ing on Th ursaa y. Oct- 10 in room 
jQgof the Biological Sciences Build- 
^ Anyone with an interest in 
hjol°£y is invited to attend. Mem- 
j^rs must pay dues for the national 
^apter at the meeting. For more 
jpformation, call 357-5677. 

glack Student Association 

Extra-large T-shirts are on sale 
in the BSA office. 

The solution committee will meet 
Wednesday, at 7 p.m. in 115 Kyser. 

purp> e Pizzaz 

pictures for the composite will be 
(gken between 10 a.m. -3 p.m. Thurs- 
day through Friday in the 
president's Room in the Student 
Union. Wear the uniform and bring 



$15, check or cash. For more infor- 
mation, call a team captain. 

Alpha Mu Gamma 

Alpha Mu Gamma, a national 
foreign language honor society, is 
accepting new members. Anyone 
who has had three semesters of 
French, Spanish, German or any 
ot her language is encouraged to con- 
tact. Dr. Rubino in the language 
department for an application by 
Thursday. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The new Tau Kappa Epsilon jun- 
ior initiates are Ron Young, Brian 
Vaugn, Jason Morgan, Chris Morel, 
David Matherne, Robert Emfinger, 
John Capone and Douglas Barron. 
The T au Kappa Epsilon swimming 
team finished first in the Intramu- 



ral swim meet. 

Contemporary Louisiana 
Writers' Series 

The Contemporary Louisiana 
Writers' Series of the Louisiana 
Scholars College will host its first 
event on Thursday, Oct. 10 in room 
209 of Russell Hall at 11 a.m. The 
speaker will be Suzanna Davis, and 
the title of the seminar will be "Get- 
ting Started in Popular Fiction." 
Davis is the author of 12 historical, 
contemporary romance novels. The 
public is welcomed and encouraged 
to attend. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 

In recognition of the installation 
of three new Sigma Sigma Sigma 
chapters across the nation, mem- 
bers should wear their badges with 



the purple and white ribbons all 
week, except Thursday. Members 
should wear their letters on Thurs- 
day. 

Housecleaning will be held on 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Alpha Phi Alpha 

There will be an information 
seminar on Thursday in room 321 
of the Student Union at 8 p.m. All 
young men interested in becoming 
a member are required to attend. 
The dress is semi-formal. 

All Organizations 

Orgnizational Renewal Cards 
with a current membership list must 
be submited to the Office of Student 
Activities and Organizations today 
in order to remain in good standing. 
Organizations failing to do so will 



forfeit their recognition and charter 
from Northwestern. If an organiza- 
tion fails to comply with this rule, 
Carl Henry, director of Student Ac- 
tivities and Organizations, will with- 
draw the charter and an organiza- 
tion will lose the privileges that go 
along with it. 

All organizations are also re- 
quired to maintain a NSU post of- 
fice box in the organization's name. 
The only exception is to have the 
mail received at a department, such 
as Le Cercle Francais-Language De- 
partment. 

Organizations must also make 
sure that all events are placed on 
the university master calendar. 

For additional information, con- 
tact Henry in room 214 of the Stu- 
dent Union or at 357-6511. 



PRSSA 

Northwestern's chapter of the 
Public Relation Student Society of 
America will meet at 2 p.m. on Mon- 
days in room 225 Kyser Hall. Any- 
one interested in public relations 
should attend. 

PRSSA will be holding a raffle 
until the drawing on Monday, Oct. 
7. Call 357-5456 for more informa- 
tion. 



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Movie to premiere at Parkway Cinema 
The Man in the Moon' to make Natchitoches debut tonight 



By MICHELLE GENRE 
tfeivs Editor 

Making its premiere in Natchi- 
toches tomorrow, "The Man in the 
Moon" is expected by critics to be a 
success in the box office. 

The premiere will take place at 7 
p.m. with a champagne reception at 
the Parkway Cinema, located at 
1011 Keyser Ave. Tickets will cost 
$25 with proceeds benefiting the 
Northwestern State University 
Foundation. The Parkway Cinema 
will be decorated in a '50s theme in 
keeping with the setting of the film, 
and guests will receive a printed 
program and other souvenirs. 

Audiences in Natchitoches will 
be among the first to see "The Man 
in The Moon. 1 ' The film will pre- 
miere nationally in late October. 

The movie, which was filmed 
using some of the homes and build- 
ings located in Natchitoches, will be 
premiered with a staggered release. 
Producers will show the movie in a 
few theaters with the hopes of its 
enteredj popularity spreading by word-of- 
mouth. 

"Word-of-mouth should make 
this story of first love and first heart- 
break set in rural Louisiana during 
the '50s a long-term player, if the 
right marketing can get those first 
trowds into the theaters," said critic 
Henry Sheehan in a recent film re- 
new. "At any rate , the picture marks 
a welcome return to the disappear- 
ing classic contours of traditional 
Hollywood film making." 

"The Man in the Moon" is an 
autobiographical coming-of-age film 
written by Jenny Wingfield and is 
based on Wingfield's childhood 
memories in Natchitoches. 

In the movie, Wingfield uses her 
own recollections for the story of 
too teenage sisters whose mutual 
W for a boy threatens their rela- 
tionship. 

"I think the people of Natchi- 
toches and NSU are going to be 
surprised at the quality of this 
lovie," said Tommy Whitehead, a 
Northwestern associate professor of 
Journalism, who worked with the 
fews during the filming of the movie 
111 the Natchitoches area. "Steel 
Magnolias' was an enormous box 
^^^^^^^^^ office success, but it was not as 
Ji Popular with the critics as 'Man in 
|lPeMoon\" 
^^^^1 'US L ^ nou g h there are few "big-name 
Wi] !t ars," the movie will introduce its 

sir 




Cake 
jffet 

al ! 



Holland: 
honored 



"Bitinued from p. 1 



1:30 
:30 



f 

th 
B 

1 Be 
Hie 



P°m his alma mater, Northwest- 
P 1 State University." 
I Holland was reported missing in 
P'on on Jan 17 when his plane 
parne the second aircraft to go 
P^n in combat in Desert Storm. 
* 8 death was not confirmed until 
"months later. 

His father, Doug Holland, said 



IN* the fact that his son died in 

¥*ense of his country brought the 

*^ilv comfort. 

He was glad to go over. He had 

reservations about going and that 

the way he would have wanted it," 

^ d Doug Holland. 

Holland graduated from North- 

j 68 tern in 1970 with an education 

, {free. He taught at French High 

?p>ol in Beaumont, Texas and at 

^Xandria Senior High in Alexan- 
q fia 



attended Officer 
He became a pilot 



1 



i.^few years later, he joined the 
^ir f i 
ii /orce and 

^hing School. 

n <l served in England, Germany 
Florida. 

b Holla nd, who flew both F-4 and 
pj, fighters, served as an exchange 
j> ot on a tour with the Royal Air 
^ fCe and on a staff tour with Head- 
» a rters Tactical Air Command at 
i n gley Air Force Base in Hamp- 




Sam Waterston stars as a father who must hold his family together when his young daughter's (Reese Witherspoon) 
affection for a young man threatens the family in MGM-Pathe's "The Man in The Moon." The movie will make its local 
premiere at the Parkway Cinema today at 7 p.m. 




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three teen-age leads, Reese 
Witherspoon, Emily Warfield and 
Jason London. The movie also stars 
Academy Award nominees Sam 
Waterston and Tess Harper. It also 
stars actress Gail Strickland. 

The film is dedicated to the pro- 
duction designer, Gene Callahan, 
who passed away four months after 
the filming completion of "The Man 
in the Moon." Callahan was a two- 
time Oscar winner for his work on 
the films, "America, America" and 
The Hustler." He received an hon- 
orary doctorate from Northwestern 
and was honored by the people of 
Natchitoches when he received a 
spot on the Natchitoches Walk of 
Fame. 

"Gene Callahan was one of the 
most respected production design- 
ers in Hollywood, and it was an 
honor to see him work on his two 
final films, 'Steel Magnolias' and 
The Man in the Moon, " said 
Whitehead. "Gene Callahan had a 
lot to do with The Man in The Moon' 
being filmed in the area." 



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Page 4 



NEWS 



Oldham plans format, physical changes 

KNWD manager wants to improve radio station's sound 



By ASHLEY PETERSON 

Staff Writer 

Format and physical changes are 
among the top priorities in KNWD 
General ManagerJason Oldham's 
plans for the upcoming year. 

Oldham believes that he can suc- 
cessfully provide students with 
music that they like to hear. He also 
wants to provide the university with 
a modern facility that allows stu- 
dents to work in a professional envi- 
ronment for broadcast training. 

"We want KNWD to both look 
and sound professional," said 
Oldham. "There is no reason why 
we can't have the best college radio 
station in the state." 

In Oldham's initial months as 
manager, he said he saw the imme- 
diate need for KNWD to re-estab- 
lish its image through its name, 
since many students felt the activi- 
ties of the station were monopolized 
by a certain few. Oldham said he 
felt that the name The Demon" 
would reinstitute the relationship 
between the radio station and its 
student body. 



In developing a better image for 
the station, Oldham found that part 
of KNWD '8 problem was its musi- 
cal format. Student requests to 
Oldham and his staff warranted a 
change. 

"Having nothing to use as a basis 
for a format change, I made a change 
from a dominant new-wave format 
to one that has a mixture of jazz, 
gospel, soul, classic and current rock, 
new wave and other variations," 
Oldham said. 

In the spring, Oldham and his 
staff plan to conduct a campus sur- 
vey to determine the popularity of 
this format change. 

"If the students are not happy, 
changes will be made. I want KNWD 
to be the students' voice — a voice 
they want to hear," said Oldham. 

According to Paul Aton, person- 
nel director, an abundance of stu- 
dents were interested in becoming 
disc jockeys at KNWD. 

"Numerous students had to be 
turned away because we only had 
75 positions to fill," said Aton. 

Disc jockeys were chosen based 



Board requires exam 

Proficiency exam tests basic writing skills 



By AMY STASZAK 

Staff Writer 

After taking the required En- 
glish core courses, some Northwest- 
ern students are confused as to what 
the English Proficiency Exam is and 
why it is required to graduate. 

"Complaints from employers 
about the lack of knowledge of basic 
English skills led the Board of Re- 
gents in 1987 to make it a require- 
ment for all graduates to have taken 
and passed an English Proficiency 
Exam," said Dr. Sara Burroughs, 
head of the Language and Commu- 
nications Department. "Students 
at both the Shreveport and Fort 
Polk campuses are also required to 
pass the exam." 

Students who began college 
classes before the fall of 1987 may 
be exempt from taking the exam. 

Burroughs suggested the test be 
taken after a student finishes his 
junior year or after completing En- 
glish 1010,1020 and a required 
sophomore course. 

"The English exam was pretty 
easy," said Monica Billiot, a senior 
public relations major from Morgan 
City. "There isn't really anything 
that one can study for the English 
exam. To know how to put your 
ideas down in a time limit is prob- 
ably the hardest thing about it." 



Ginny Mix, a senior public rela- 
tions major from New Roads, ad- 
vises students who are going to take 
the test to "write in complete sen- 
tences. Just take your time and 
don't feel rushed or nervous." 

Each test is graded by two fac- 
ulty members based on whether the 
writer would have been able to exit 
English 1020 with a grade of "C" or 
better. 

In the spring of 1991, 209 stu- 
dents took the exam, and 64 failed. 

Burroughs believed that 64 was 
a low number, and also said that 
some of the 209 students that took 
the exam may have been taking it 
for the second time. 

"Students usually fail due to 
grammatical errors, spelling, simple 
punctuation problems or they just 
forget how to write," said Burroughs. 
"The student should be able to orga- 
nize a paper by writing a thesis and 
having examples to support that 
thesis." 

Only 78 students showed up for 
thetestgivenonSept.20. Burroughs 
believes that there should have been 
a greater turnout for the test and 
hopes there will be for the next test 
on Nov. 22. 

When taking the exam, a stu- 
dent must bring his social security 
card, I.D., a blue book, a dictionary 
and pen. 



Northwestern offers 
health insurance 



By KATHY DODGE 

Staff Writer 

All full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents are eligible for the health in- 
surance plan offered by Northwest- 
ern. 

Student insurance is a minimal 
accident/illness policy. The pre- 
mium, which is taken out of tuition 
at registration, is $22 per semester 
for the spring and fall and $11 for 
the summer. Spouses and children 
of students may be covered at an 
additional charge. 

The policy will pay up to $50 for 
lab costs and x-ray fees charged by 
local doctors. 

Items covered by the insurance 
include emergency room expenses, 
short stays in the hospital, injuries 
suffered in the Intramural build- 
ing, maternity fees, psychotherapy 
benefits, accidental death and dis- 
memberment benefits. 

However, injuries suffered dur- 
ing participation in IM games are 
not covered. 

"When you are involved in activi- 
ties like that, it's a greater liabil- 
ity," said Northwestern nurse Anna 
Harrington. 

Other exclusions include eye ex- 
aminations or other treatments for 
visual defects, hearing examina- 
tions, dental treatment, participa- 
tion in a riot or civil disorder, sui- 
cide or attempted suicide, skydiv- 
ing, hang gliding, or flight in any 



kind of aircraft, except while riding 
on a commercial flight. Also not 
covered are treatment in a govern- 
ment hospital, elective surgery and 
elective abortion, organ transplants, 
assistant surgeon fees, war or any 
act of war, the use of illegal drugs, 
outpatient psychotherapy, routine 
newborn baby care and prescrip- 
tion drugs used while not in the 
hospital. 

Neither injuries sustained in a 
motor vehicle accident to the extent 
that benefits are payable by any 
other insurance nor injuries that 
are payable under worker's com- 
pensation are covered by student 
insurance. 

Students must attend classes for 
the first 31 days after the date the 
coverage is purchased for the insur- 
ance to be effective. Student status 
may be investigated as well as at- 
tendance records to verify that eli- 
gibility requirements have been met. 
If the requirements have not been 
met, the premium will be refunded. 

Any student who already has 
health insurance may file for a re- 
fund at the infirmary, according to 
Harrington. 

"You get more coverage with the 
parents' insurance, but there are no 
deductibles with student insur- 
ance," she said. 

A brochure explaining the plan 
in full is available at the university 
infirmary. 



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Invitations 


Computer Forms 




Banners, etc. 




CREATIONS 






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on their qualifications. Because of 
the many different types of music 
being played, each special show or 
hour required a disc jockey with 
knowledge and interest in that par- 
ticular style of music. 

The styles of music range from 
classic and current rock during the 
week, to alternative, soul, gospel 
and jazz on the weekends. Satur- 
day is strictly alternative, whereas 
Sunday holds a variety. From 6-9 
a.m. on Sundays, listeners can en- 
joy gospel, while 9 a.m. -3 p.m. is 
reserved for the jazz lovers. After 3 
p.m., soul music fills the airwaves. 

Oldham recognizes that these 
changes might not please the entire 
student body. "I might receive some 
flack from the students who don't 
agree on the musical format 
changes, but you can't please every- 
one," he said. "But I feel the changes 
that have been made are what the 
majority of students want." 

Besides the change in music, new 
features have been added to the 
programming this semester. Lis- 
teners can enjoy a sports show at 6 



a.m. and again at noon. The staff 
has also originated a remote adven- 
ture called High Friday. Every Fri- 
day, KNWD personalities will 
broadcast high atop a building, bill- 
board, etc. and offer prizes and pro- 
motional give-a-ways. 

KNWD will also broadcast all 
Northwestern home football games. 
Oldham and Johnny Kavanaugh 
will provide commentary, while Paul 
Parker will give listeners a play-by- 
play of the game. 

Physical renovations to the South 
Hall facility began this summer. 
For three years, a portion of the 
Student Association fees for KNWD 
has been set aside to fund these 
renovations. Changes include new 
carpet and blinds, as well as paint- 
ing and sound-proofing different 
parts of the station. 

Another change to The Demon is 
its wattage. In a few weeks, The 
Demon will be projecting 250 watts 
of power, which is 25 times greater 
than what is projected now. This 
change will result in a larger listen- 
ing radius, Oldham said. 



Photo by Shawn Blank 



Northwestem's ROTC program will host the 12th annual Demon Field Training 
Exercise onThursday at the NSU Obstacle Field. 




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October 





Photo by Shawn Bin* 

Charlie Holt, production member, prepares theelaboratesetfortheupcom. 
ing comedy "Tartuffe" in Theatre West. 

Students prepare play 



By LEIGH FLYNN 

Staff Writer 

Northwestern theater students 
are currently preparing for 
"Tartuffe," the first performance 
of the 1991-92 season. 

The play, which is a comical 
farce by Moliere, will run Oct. 15- 
22 in Theatre West of the Creative 
and Performing Arts Center. 

"Tartuffe" is a story of religious 
hypocrisy and the happy medium 
between total and nonexistent 
trust, said Lynn Gilcrease, stu- 
dent director of publicity. 

"People in Moliere's time mis- 
understood the play. It is not 
criticizing religion, it is against 
religious hypocrisy. It relates to 
the Jimmy Swaggart and Jim 
Bakker stories," said Gilcrease. 

The cast consists of Ashley Gail 
White as Madame Pernelle; David 
Shamburger as Orgon; Lynn 
Gilcrease as Elmire; Shane 
Clabaugh as Damis; Kim Howard 



as Mariane; Brian Peterson as 
Valere; Damian Domingue as 
Cleante; Robert Larriviere as 
Tartuffe; DeAnna Gonzales as 
Dorine; Daryl Lathon as M. Loyal; 
Ryan Glorioso as police officer one; 
Chris Gleason as police officer two; 
John Landrum as police officer 
three; Joanie Garner as Flipote, 
and Allison DeLeon as the maid. 

Gilcrease said that all props 
are created by students with the 
help of Vernon Carroll, set and 
lighting director, and Jan 
Johnston, costume and make-up 
designer. 

"Nothing is borrowed, rented, 
or bought. The actors are given the 
chance to learn everything about 
putting together a production, not 
just their lines," said Gilcrease 

Taking place in the time of King 
Louis XIV, the production "intro- 
duces the most elaborate set and 
costumes that Northwestern has 
seen in a long time," said Gilcrease, 



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Dei 



JJy PAUL Pi 

sta ff Writer 

After ever-) 
gjeworks wei 
„ n fired, the 
proved to be i 

Despite th 
8 record-bres 
ing by East 
back Bob B< 
emerged with 
record at 2-2. 

Down 23-! 
ter, the Dem 
late rally wh 
Qoldmansacl 
The safety n 
but also gave 
back on the f 

Jeff Pow 
starting kicl 
and kicked tl 
USU a lead 
again. A late 
hiring an Ad 
tion, proved 1 
the Demons i 

The East '. 
559 total yar 
Storm" defei 
selves just sh 

"We made 
ter mistakes 
East Texas 
Vowell. "We 
butwecouldn 
plays in the fo 
have 1,000 y 
you don't wi 
thing." 

Northwes 
Goodwin pro! 
team's attitu 
terback Bob 1 

They've \ 
Bounds. I'll 
gone." 

Senior lin« 
had a big gam 
10 tackles. I 



Cro 



ByJON TEE 

Sports Editor 
Maryalyce 
feadoledth* 
Saturday at tl 
Invitational 
lecond pla( 
competition. 

Walsh, wit 
»e of six Lai 
finish the thi 
top twenty, 
•heir second 
McNeese finii 
fallowed by 
PNO, Nic 
Southeastern 
"The whole 
,a id Lady I 
^ggio.Tou 
*at the girls 
JWkind of 
St us ahea< 
Other La. 
* e reJudyNc 
Pia Davisc 
^rieGiped 
(20:12 
*°:28)atl8t 
Ql :20) at 27t 
ftosado's t 
^ e -milemen 
J e edgethat| 
S**. just 01 
J 6 final st£ 
Sing the 1 
' Southern, 
**Tulane. 
Northwest 
a d Sievers, 
ae of2l:27,! 
* race was. 
J^hers wen 
gHTiml 
? bb ie Bryai 
^ e Coronai 



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c 



terl, 1991 



^ber 1,1991 



Page 5 



7 




SUPER SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 



Louisiana Tech 42, Arkansas St. 10 
Nevada 54, Montana St. 12 
UTEP 28, Wyoming 28 
Sam Houston 16,Western Illinois 21 



Southwest Texas 19, Nicholls St. 10 
Northeast 17, Mississippi College 7 
Southwest Missouri 21, N.Texas 21 
Boise St. 38, SFA 7 



pemons squeeze by East Texas in home opener 26-23 



Photo by Shawn Bla* 

tfortheupconv 



lay 



. Peterson at 
Domingue as 
jarriviere aa 
Gonzales at 
in as M. Loyal; 
ice officer one; 
ice officer two; 
fjolice officer 
er as Flipote, 
i as the maid 
hat all propg 
lents with the 
rroll, set and 
r, and Jan 
and make-up 

owed, rented, 
s are given the 
rything about 
roduction, not 
d Gilcrease. 
le time of King 
luctjon "intro- 
>orate set and 
hwestern has 
said Gilcrease. 



urant 



5y PAUL PARKER 

sta ff Writer 

0er every aircraft flew over, all 
gjeworks were shot and every can- 
pon fired, the Demon home opener 
r0 ved to be a game of big plays. 

Despite three blocked kicks and 
8 record-breaking 430 yards pass- 
im by East Texas State quarter- 
back Bob Bounds, Northwestern 
emerged with a victory to even their 
record at 2-2. 

Down 23-21 in the fourth quar- 
ts the Demon defense sparked a 
late rally when defensive end Eric 
Goldman sacked Bounds for a safety. 
ft e safety not only tied the game 
but also gave Northwestern the ball 
bgck on the free kick. 

Jeff Powell replaced Demon 
starting kicker Jason Fernandez 
jnd kicked the field goal that gave 
fjSU a lead they would not lose 
again. A late defensive stand, fea- 
turing an Adrian Hardy intercep- 
tion, proved to be the last big play 
the Demons would need. 

The East Texas offense piled up 
559 total yards against the "Purple 
Storm" defense but found them- 
selves just short of a victory. 

"We made too many fourth quar- 
ter mistakes on both sides," said 
East Texas State coach Eddie 
Vowell. "We had a heck of a game 
but we couldn't come up with the big 
plays in the fourth quarter. You can 
have 1,000 yards of offense, but if 
you don't win, it doesn't mean a 
thing." 

Northwestern coach Sam 
Goodwin probably summed up his 
team's attitude about ETSU quar- 
terback Bob Bounds best. 

"They've got a great player in 
Bounds. I'll be glad to see him 
gone." 

Senior linebacker Andre Carron 
had a big game himself. Carron had 
10 tackles. On the fourth tackle, 




A field goal by Lion kicker Billy 
Watkins from 38 yards would pro- 
vide a temporary lead, but NSU 
quickly regained the edge. Another 
Gilliam touchdown put the Demons 
ahead with time running out in the 
half. 

The Demon defense came up with 
a key play of its own courtesy of 
Adrian Hardy, who blocked a Lion 
field goal attempt to preserve a half- 
time-lead for NSU. 

The East Texas offense contin- 
ued to drive in the second half, but 
timely defensive plays and consis- 
tent running from Ridgell allowed 
NSU to escape with a 26-23 win. 



Demon assistant football coach and former quarterback Scott Stoker (left) confers with freshman quarterback Chris Gilliam (right) during Saturday night's home game against 
East Texas State. Northwestern defeated East Texas in their first home game of the season, raising their record to 2-2 on the year. The Demons are off this week, and will 
continue their home season the following week against conference rival North Texas. 



Carron not only forced the strong 
ETSU offense to punt but also man- 
aged to break one of NSU's most 
noticeable defensive records. Three- 
time All-American Gary Reasons, 
now with the New York Giants, lost 
his record of 394 career tackles to 
Carron. 

Carron and the defense struggled 
at times, and it appeared early that 
they had a potentially long night 
ahead of them. In the first quarter 
the Demons found themselves down 



7-0 when Victor Robinson returned 
an East Texas kickoff for 47 yards to 
the Lion 45. 

Redshirt freshman quarterback 
Chris Gilliam, along with some 
strong running from Deon Ridgell, 
soon drove the Demons to the two- 
yard line, where Gilliam took it in 
for the score. East Texas defensive 
tackle Micah Haley then blocked 
the first of his three kicks in the first 
half to preserve a 7-6 lead. 

Goodwin later showed concern 



for his kicking game. "We've worked 
really hard over the last two weeks 
to improve our kicking game. We're 
going to have to reevaluate," he said. 

Goodwin, who used redshirt 
freshman kicker Jeff Powell after 
previous kicks by Fernandez had 
been blocked, was glad to have more 
than one kicker in his arsenal. 

"When you have two kickers, if 
one's not doing the job it's nice to 
have the option to change." 

ETSU added to their lead follow- 



ing a Gilliam fumble on the NSU 44- 
yard line. Less thanlO seconds into 
the second quarter, Bounds found 
flanker Billy Minor to give the Li- 
ons a 14-6 lead. 

The Demon offense then showed 
some muscle of its own on a Gilliam 
touchdown pass to John Tappin, 
which covered 56 yards. Gilliam 
then scored the two-point conver- 
sion on a keeper to tie the game at 
14-14. 



DEMON BOX 



NSU 
ETSU 



15 
10 



26 
23 



ETSU-Minor 47 pass from Bounds (Watkins kick) 
NSU-Gilliam 1 run (kicked blocked) 
ETSU-Minor 30 pass from Bounds (Watkins kick) 
NSU-Tappin 56 pass from Gilliam (Gilliam run) 
ETSU-Watkins 38 field goal 
NSU-Gilliam 2 run (Powell kick) 
ETSU-Watkins 32 field goal 
ETSU-Watkins 21 field goal 
NSU-Safety. Bounds tackled in end zone by 
Goldman 

NSU-Powell 19 field goal 
A- 11. 400 



First Downs 

Rushes-yards 

Passing yards 

Comp-Atl-Int 

Sacks Against 

3 rt Down Conversions 

Total Offensive Plays 

Punts-Avg 

Return Yards 

Possession Time 

Fumbles-Lost 

Penalties-Yards 



NSU 

16 

46-193 
132 
9-19-0 


1 of 10 

65 
4-40 
75 
27:32 
2-2 
7-96 



ETSU 

25 
38-128 
430 
24-36-2 
3 

6 of 13 
74 
1-43 
10 
32:28 
5-3 
13-117 



INDIVIDUAL STATISnCS 

Rushlng-NSU, Ridgell 22-38. Gilliam 1 8-57. B. 
Brown 4-7, Pierre 2-4, Tappin 1-(-8). ETSU. Perry 
14-74, Chapman 9-32, Bounds 15-22, Brooks 1-1, 
Mozeke 1 -0. 

Passing-NSU, Gilliam 9-19-0-132. 
t rSU-Bounds 24-36-2-430. 

Recelvlng-NSU, Tappin 2-51, Jones 3-33. S. 
Brown 2-28, Arevalo 1-11, McKellum 1-9. ETSU, Harp 
5-118. Minor 4-103, Tennison 4-85, Perry 3-42. Brooks 
4-40. Mozeke 2-28. Chapman 1-9, Griffin 1-6. 



e $5.00 



ffirjil (4) 



7, frie<{ rice. 



Cross country wins at Tech 



's 
1 

ets 
49 



ByJON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

Maryalyce Walsh and Damien 
Rosado led the Northwestern charge 
Saturday at the USL Cross Country 
Invitational, each capturing a 
second place finish in tough 
competition. 

Walsh, with a time of 18:11, was 
on e of six Lady Demon runners to 
feish the three-mile course in the 
top twenty, giving Northwestern 
fteir second victory this season. 
"cNeese finished the meet second, 
followed by Tulane, USL, LSU, 
UNO, Nicholls State and 
Southeastern. 

"The whole team ran really well," 
ia 'd Lady Demon coach Chris 
'^ a ggio. "You can tell from the times 
Jjjat the girls all ran close together. 
*flat kind of pack running is what 
Wt us ahead of McNeese." 

Other Lady Demon finishers 
* e re Judy Norris ( 19: 1 1 ) at fourth, 
^rla Davison (19:33) at eighth, 
* a rie Gipe (19:38) at ninth, Dianne 
^bay (20:12) at 15th, Julie Martin 
20: 28) at 18th, and Karen Currant 
2l :20j at 27th. 

Rosado's time of 20:16 for the 
J*e-mile men's course was probably 
, e e dge that gave the Demons third 



Both teams will travel to Denton, 
Texas for the North Texas 
Invitational this week. The men will 
run five miles while the women run 



three. 

"Both the size and the 
competition will make this meet 
really tough," said Maggio. 



"*> just one point above LSU. 



iew 
A 
ss 

Jets 



ne final standings showed USL 
Ning the 1 1-team field, followed 
' Southern, Northwestern, LSU, 

g ^orthwestern's second runner, 
r ad Sievers, finished 19th with a 
^ e of 2 1 :27 , showing just how close 
. e r ace was. Other Northwestern 
^hers were Les McMillan (21:37) 
h^ 3 rd, Tim Rosas (22:02) at 32nd, 
jT^ie Bryar (22:23) at 43rd and 
ne Coronado (22:31) at 47th. 




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"These guys are hot!" 



Page 6 



EDITORIAL 



October 1, lSty 




Current Sauce 



Van Rodney Reed 

Editor 

Elizabeth McDavid Harris 

Managing Editor 
Michelle Genre 
News Editor 
Chris McGee 
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Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 
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Todd Martin 



Brad Brown 
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Staff 



Shawn Blank Tony Means 
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A rlisl 
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EDITORIAL 



nooz'pa'par 

n. a publication regularly printed and 
distributed, usually daily or weekly, 
containing news, opinions, 

advertisements and other items of general 
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That is how the New World Dictionary 
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The Current Sauce is a newspaper. 

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some still consider the Sauce a newsletter, 
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Grafitti You Won't See at NSU 



go Hiwe.' p 



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Goddess ! 



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ITZA PIZZA - Hi^oW 

Fastest pizza in town 



BUI Long 

for 
Governor 



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cueese 



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COACH? 




^1 



Guest Column 

Todd Martin 



African-Americans are not victims 



October* 



Guest 

Chris 

Tai 
pui 



College si 
at ions. The 
getting toge 
going out. 
ion and the 
priorities, 
youracquaii 
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After a few months hiatus, in- 
eluding a stint in the District of 
Columbia, I decided it was time to 
return to my old column and get 
back into the swing of things. Those 
of you that have been here for a few 
semesters know how I write, but 
our new frosh class hasn't been prop- 
erly exposed. I hate to see anyone 
deprived. 

As I sat down to write my column 
this week, I was all set to do some 
grade-A critiques about Gay Stud- 
ies on campuses across the nation. I 
had researched the topic thoroughly, 
and I was ready to go toe-to-toe with 
my liberal (sorry, radical) friends 
on the left. But, as I sat down to my 
terminal, I had a brief discussion 
with one of my more conservative 
friends. We were both lamenting 
that we would like to address the 
fact that most conservative are la- 
beled racist by default, but to try 
and defend our reasoning, we might 
again be labeled racist. 

Last year, I wrote a column in 
which I mentioned David Duke and 
conservatism in the same sentence. 
Immediately, all over campus, I was 
the new neo-Nazi of the right. I was, 
and still am, insulted by the impli- 
cation. Unfortunately, there are 
people who do not understand my 
position, nor my philosophy, and I 
am taking this opportunity to clarify 
it. 



Conservatives, going back to the 
Goldwater campaign in 1964, have 
been labeled racist unjustly. Our 
opposition to affirmative action, 
quotas, time tables and Afro-Ameri- 
can curricula have placed us 
squarely with the Skinheads in tol- 
erance for all things not Caucasian. 
The sad part is conservatives iden- 
tify more and can do more for Afri- 
can-Americans than the left ever 
hoped for. Our solutions do not 
agree with the prevailing opinion, 



they garner pri v ileges based on race? 

Liberals and some black Ameri- 
cans are quick to answer, but their 
responses are growing more tired 
and sound more and more pro- 
grammed: The black race has been 
victimized since the day they were 
brought over on slave ships, and 
today they still suffer the underly- 
ing problems of racism associated 
with slavery. The black American 
needs government intervention to 
get out of the way of the slings and 



"Certainly, there were barriers to 
minorities in the past, but these 
have gone by way of the Dodo. " 



but as the rise of black conserva- 
tives, including Clarence Thomas, 
show, our ideas are gaining popu- 
larity and are working. 

Liberals, in general, believe that 
the African-Americans are victims. 
Blacks are unable to make gains on 
their own and need government as- 
sistance to make their mark in the 
world. This is propaganda at its 
worst. The Afro-American is no 
different from any other person on 
this Earth. They are not handi- 
capped in any way, so why then do 



arrows of prejudice. The black man 
is repressed to this day by the white. 
I am never more sickened and dis- 
appointed than when I hear this, 
and I wish others would feel the 
same. 

I have always had friends that 
were black, and all of these friends 
had basically the same philosophy 
about blacks in the United States: 
You are what you make yourself, 
not what some politician 1 ,000 miles 
away says you are. The American 
dream offers unlimited possibilities 



as to what you can become. Cei 
tainly, there were barriers to 4 
norities in the past, but these hat 
gone the way of the Dodo. Sure.tk 
going may be slower than what sou 
want, but when in life is the goi» 
easy? 

Blacks can do more for then 
selves by discarding the old notio 
of victimization and taking hold 
the idea of the marketplace: itstt 
who or what you are, its how vi 
you do your job. Those who considi 
themselves victims give themselvf 
an excuse to fail, when, in this d«! 

and age, there is no real excus* 
Blacks in Watts or Compton are* 
worse off than the Whites in ApP* 
lachia because they all start off wi^ 
the same basic inalienable rights- 
True conservatives are co^ 
blind. When an applicant comes" 1 
for a job, the color does not rnatW 
and the qualifications do. Hirinf 
someonejust because they are bP 
is just as wrong as hiring them 
because they are white. I do" 
choose my friends because of col* 
but I suspect this will be disputed 
don't believe in discrimination $ 
any word, shape or form, but i 
worst fears are correct, I am 
to suffer for this article. I mil! 



disagree with what my critics 
but I will be the first to defend t 
right to say it. 



Guest 

Jerry 

Eli 

Unu! 



There co 
person's life 
those digest 
no use to yo 
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^ning exp< 
As I stai 
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of writers. ' 
tobeabathi 
'Pen andp 
your drawei 
s it right do 



Readers' Forum 



Tell the Sauce your opinion 



The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
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Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an indepe" 1 
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Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers. ! 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the careta 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



Th 



Gues 

Ivan 1 



The en 
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October 1,1991 



OPINION 



Page 7 



Guest Column 

Chris Gleason 



Tailgate Party serves social 
purposes for NSU students 



is 



i become. Cd 
barriers to A 
but these hat 
Dodo. Sure, til 
than what sffl 
ife is the goifl 

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I the old notifl 

I taking hold 
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e, its how ti 
se who consii 
jive themselv 
len, in this <fe 

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tompton are* 
Whites in Apj* 
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ves are com 
licant comes i* 
ses not matt*' 
ns do. HirW 
e they are bla* 
iring themj«* 
vhite. I doj 
ecause of col* 

II be disputed; 1 
crimination " 
form, but iff 
ect, I am 
rticle. I 
my critics stf 
to defend th<* 



nproveme"'^ 
,ttopublisJ' 
n indepe"* 

)96 betwee^ 
classified' 



request© 



eaders. 



the careta 1 



College students love social situ- 
ations. There's nothing quite like 
getting together with friends and 
-jngout. Observing the latest fash- 
ion and the latest gossip are high 
priorities. Standing around with 
your acquaintances belittling every- 
„ e around you seems a prerequi- 
jite. The Tailgate Party last Satur- 
day at Prather Coliseum was a great 
jocial situation, especially for the 
green freshman. 

The setup at the party was good — 
massive room, food, alcohol, and a 
loud band. What more could a party 
animal want? All the primitive de- 
sires were quenched, save one. And 
to ensure my future here 111 refrain 
from mentioning that one. Anyway, 
the day was beautiful, and with the 
evening football game on the hori- 
zon, everyone seemed "wired." 

There were some interesting 
sights to be seen Saturday after- 
noon. With the given ensemble of 
drunk fraternity guys, fat guys with 
hamburgers and university cops 
acting like the Terminator, one had 
to wonder where creativity would 
rear its head. I'd have to give the 



honors to a guy I saw walking around 
with a four-foot python. The snake 
seemed friendly enough, but he kept 
eying a university policeman. Why 
do those guys stare at you as if 
you're the social equivalent of 
Charles Manson? Loosen your belts 
a little guys. There are no Russian 
spies on campus, trust me. 

Several guys, obviously frater- 

"All in all, the 
party mast a 
SUCCESS, reach- 
in g new heights 

in personal 

indulgence " 

nity gentlemen since they laughed 
and drank on cue, had a literal tail- 
gate party by jumping up and down 
in the back of a pick-up truck. No 
doubt the truck's owner was too 
drunk to be concerned with his 



shocks. Oh well, Mom and Dad will 
have to buy him another truck, I 
guess. I mean gosh .this one is two 
years old. No offense meant to fra- 
ternities, it's just that they remind 
me of socialized medicine. 

All in all, the party was a suc- 
cess, reaching new heights in per- 
sonal indulgence. From hand paint- 
ing to football tossing to beer guz- 
zling, all types of pleasure were cov- 
ered. The band pounded away with- 
out mercy throughout the afternoon 
and the hamburgers were fresh. 
Most everyone I talked with men- 
tioned that the turnout was much 
better than last year's. Maybe the 
biorythms carried over to the game, 
because we beat a clearly superior 
team. Anyway, the party was a 
success. 

A good friend of mine was serv- 
ing beer and he happened to give me 
afreebie. Chalk one up for me. And 
by the way, please don't send any of 
those university cops my way. Oh, 
that's right, they're finishing their 
last round of burgers and watching 
the instructional video on how to 
look intimidating! 



Guest Column 

Fred Taulbee Jr. 



Movie theaters create magic 

Charm of Saturday matinees remains timeless 
despite admission, concession stand prices 



When I was lost in the '70s, like 
everyone else, I had the opportunity 
of being in West Germany on an 
U.S. Army post. The things I re- 
member the most are the German 
candy store, teeball, Suzanna and 
most of all, Saturday matinees. 
Suzanna was an extremely close 
second. 

The Army post was like a big 
chunk of America plopped right 
down in the middle of Germany. So 
everything, including the theater, 
was run by the Army. The Saturday 
matinees only cost 25 cents, and 
with the money I had left over I 
would buy a relish- and ketchup- 
drenched hot dog and a Fanta root 
beer. They only sold Fanta brand 
fountain drinks. 

People would let their friends in 
through the exit door and the sun- 
shine would blind everybody. "Shut 
the door!" The floors were coated 
with hard, sticky soda pop; the arms 
of the chairs were covered with 
bumps of hardened gum; but the 
screen was the worst. It was cov- 
ered in soda pop stains. 

We saw Disney movies, like "The 
Gnome-Mobile," "Old Yeller," and 
"Herbie, The Love Bug" pictures. I 
have always wanted a bug. 

Theaters have come so far since 



then that the number of screens 
they have is usually included in the 
name of the cinema, like Parkway 
Cinema IV. It certainly doesn't cost 
a quarter to get in, and they don't 
serve hot dogs. But they do serve 
pickles, so many that they occasion- 
ally run out . Why pickles sell at a 
theater, I will never know. 

The big complaint at theaters 
today is about prices. A few years 
ago there was a big scare about a 
national rise in admission prices. 
Rumors said it cost $7 in New York 
theaters. Prices were high enough 
then, but the big scare proved mean- 
ingless. 

Concession stand prices have al- 
ways been high, but the concession 
stand is a theater's main source of 
profit. Most people think payroll is 
a cinema's only expense, but it's not. 
The bigger the film, the more the 
owner has to pay to get it to show at 
his theater, risking the chance that 
the film may not pay for itself. You 
can wait for it to come out on video, 
but there is nothing like the feel of a 
theater. 

We are lucky to have a four 
screen-theater here in Natchitoches. 
I did some of my growing up in 
Leesville, La. Before they built the 
new six-screen cinema, there was 



only the Vernon Theater, located on 
ever-decaying Third Street. It only 
had one screen, and the movies ar- 
rived about six months after the 
previews would appear on T.V. It's 
a nightclub now. 

The Vernon Theater also had pop 
stains on the screen and soda pop 
hardened on its floors. The Park- 
way Cinema is spotless compared to 
the theaters that I'm used to. The 
screens are clean. The floors are 
cleaned between every showing. 
Customers rarely use the trash cans 
provided; therefore, after a show 
the floors are always littered, but 
it's a tradition to leave the giant cup 
of popcorn with only the seeds left in 
it and the condensating cup of ice on 
the floor, isn't it? The Parkway 
Cinema also has spring loaded seats 
that rock and just enough space 
between the two chairs in front of 
me to put my foot. 

For $3, movie-goers can get a 
large popcorn and a large soda pop 
that will put them in the bathroom 
halfway through the movie. Imissed 
the sex scene in "Point Break" be- 
cause of a trip to the bathroom. IH 
have to see it again, without the 
drink this time. 



Guest Column 

Jerry Roberson 



Elite expression found in bathroom 

Unusual 'toilet bowl' literature invites criticism 



There comes a time in every 
person's life when you must excrete 
those digested particles that are of 
no use to you. We're not as fortu- 
nate as birds. They can drop their 
load while in flight. Nevertheless, 
we humans, supposedly the most 
intelligent animals on earth, have 
been trained to go to a designated 
facility to "doodoo." What did your 
parents call it? They come up with 
such cute names. w > ' ■ * 

For whatever reason, this seems 
to be the time that people become 
■nest expressive. Obviously, many 
feel that this is the most creative 
wivironment for writing deep lit- 
erature. Unfortunately, there isn't 
touch to do other than to read raw 
ar t, or join in the folly. 

Now, IH admit, it only took me 
"bout 30 minutes to compose a list 
°f "toilet bowl" literature. Never- 
theless, I must say it was an enter- 
taining experience. 

As I started my research jour- 
" e y, I found that there was an offi- 
cial way of joining this elite society 
°f writers. "ATTENTION — Want 
10 be a bathroom philosopher? Grab 
8 Pen and put down the seat. Drop 
J">ur drawers, now watch the heat. 
Sit right down and take your place. 



Collect your thoughts and fill a 
space." 

Wow, no meetings to attend, and 
no initiation fee to pay. This came 
as a shock. I can't believe you can 
actually join without having to pay. 
Oh yeah, I almost forgot, he did end 
it by saying, "Thank you for partici- 
pating." 

The next question was, "Who's 
already in this organization?" Well, 
based on what was written, the 
membership has a good variety of 
people ranging from homosexuals 
to heterosexuals; from members of 
Greek organizations to non-mem- 
bers; from political liberals to con- 
servatives; from blacks to whites; 
from intellectuals to comedians... 
the list goes on forever. Neverthe- 
less, the most obvious members were 
the good Christian folk. 

"Satan is defeated! Jesus is 
Champion!" 

"Jesus saves — Acts 4:13" 

"Jesus heels!" [sic] 

"Give your life to Jesus!" 
No, I'm not picking on the Chris- 
tians, but obviously some of their 
associates are writing a good bit of 
this vital information. After all, 
those who oppose the Christians 



write their own things. For ex- 
ample: 

"The end is near, your Satin's 
own. It's time for harvess. Your soul 
is sown." |sic] 

Sadly enough, I have not made 
those spelling errors. I copied this 
stuff straight off the walls. 

Well, you can't talk about reli- 
gion without talking about politics. 
I had no idea that people here at 
NSU were so interested in politics. 
After all, over half of our students 
don't even vote in campus elections. 
However, they sure do have a lot to 
say about state and national poli- 
tics: 

"Vote for DUKE — he last white 
hope!" 

"Duke Sux! Hope for what? 
Another Germany." 

"Edwin Edwards should have 
helped write the U.S. Constitution." 

"Jesse Jackson couldn't be presi- 
dent, his only experience in politics 
is voting." 

Now, I must admit some of these 
people truly have a way with words. 
And the subjects are sometimes so 
deep. For example, "A sluggard in 
all his conceit is wiser than six men 
of knowledge. If he's a well-edu- 
cated slug!" 



Finally, there are members of 
the group with tremendous anxiety 
attacks. I don't know what causes 
these outbursts. Perhaps it has 
somethi ng to do with their last meal. 
Whatever the reason, these people 
become somewhat violent. For ex- 
ample: 

"Abandon all hope ye who crosses 
me!" 

"Resteasy.thenightapproaches. 
I will kill tonight?" 

I don't understand this madness. 
Everyone here is supposed to be an 
adult. Why do we find it necessary 
to write on the walls of our restroom 
facilities? Everybody complains 
about the expense of NSU. We con- 
stantly gripe about the rising tu- 
ition. But it costs money to keep the 
facilities here clean. Buying sup- 
plies and paying people to scrub the 
bathroom walls is an unnecessary 
expense. Besides, who really wants 
to read this "toilet bowl" literature 
anyway. 

If someone must read, let them 
buy a magazine or pull out one of 
their texts. If students are destined 
to write or they feel strongly about 
something, they should submit it to 
someone for publication or keep a 
journal. 



Guest Column 

Michael Jones 



Newspaper writing has 
numerous benefits 



There are many reasons that a 
maturing, socially-conscious college 
student would want to write for a 
school newspaper. He might want to 
have a say in school issues or maybe 
just brighten someone's day by shar- 
ing an amusing collegiate experience 
to which his readers could easily re- 
late. Though these are lofty ideas 
which I would be proud to say are my 
motivation for writing, in truth there 
are only three reasons that I would 
like to write for the Current Sauce: 
money, power and women. 

The first reason, money, is self- 
explanatory. As I understand it, 
writers for school papers get paid 
much more than other writers. The 
average writer ata college-levelnews- 
paper gets paid approximately 85 
percent more than the editor of 
"Newsweek." And then there are 
fringe benefits. The plush mountain 
chalets. ..the private limousine 
service. ..the weekend visits to Ber- 
muda... ah, the rewards are endless. 

Power is the second reason I have 
for writing. "The pen is mightier 
than the sword," Bugs Bunny once 
said. I don't know if he ever ex- 
pounded on computers or word pro- 
cessors, but I'm sure they're just as 
mighty. You just can't really carry 
them around with you in your pocket 
as easily. And we writers have an 
uncanny ability to influence events 
by our very presence. Think about 



"Murder, She Wrote." Everywhere 
Jessica Fletcher goes, somebody gets 
killed. My roommate had better look 
out, I guess... 

I suppose my last reason, women, 
is a little predictable. After all, it's 
common knowledge that girls flock to 
male writers. Just look at John Candy 
in "Delirious." And I really need that, 
because I'm a senior and if I don't get 
married (or at least engaged) pretty 
quick, I'm afraid I won't be able to 
graduate on time. My transcript and 
my ring f nger are both looking pretty 
bare. But now, since I'll be able to 
have any girl I want, I can just ask 
someone out once and pop the ques- 
tion. It will be much, much cheaper, 
and less nerve-wracking for me, and 
she'll be happy because she'll be en- 
gaged to a writer. I'll write her biog- 
raphy, and they'll make a movie of it 
and get Julia Roberts to play her. 

So, you can easily see why I want 
to write for the newspaper. The posi- 
tive aspects far outweigh the nega- 
tive ones. After a few semesters at it, 
I'll have a two-story brick home or 
two, a different sports car for every- 
day of the week, a summer home in 
Venice, a gorgeous wife (who models 
on the side, just for fun), and two or 
three kids. And a hip dog. I know it's 
a bleak picture, but I just don't know 
if I'll be able to afford two homes in 
Venice. Maybe not in the first year, 
anyway. 



The Big Green is leading America in wrong direction 



j»uest Column 

Ivan MacDonald 



The environmentally-conscious 
to be the new national hero, or 
Nbe that's what the "new lea" 
*' 8 hes to believe. Many loopholes 
Jf e overlooked in this new religion of 
^terrorism. The general public is, 
41 long last, beginning to take a more 
^tical attitude toward the claims of 
jjjch groups as Greenpeace and Earth 
irs t. The mass majority of environ- 
mental protesters are just Abbey 
f^fiman wanna-bes, who have little 
Swledge of the truth. If we exam- 
the heresy that liberals seem to 
*" e am up out of the bowels of idiocy 
g two of their biggest arguments, 
warming and Acid rain, we 
gj»»t question the sanity and cred- 
'''ty of such individuals. 

James Mahoney, the director of 
. h * Environmental Protection 
/kney's National Acid Precipitation 
j^Hsment project, testified before 
^"gress that acid rain has had "...no 
! Sc ernible effects on crops or forest 
J^'ds." He also went on to say that if 



no steps were taken to rectify the 
acid rain "problem" that the "chemi- 
cal status of lakes would stay the 
same for next 50 years," which indi- 
cates that the chemical status oflakes 
is not seriously effected by acid rain. 

Basically, Mahoney's statements 
make the liberal-driven bill, which 
plans to cut sulfur dioxide output 
and would cost the tax payers an 
estimated four to six billion dollars, 
nearly irrelevant. The study also 
found that 90 percent of the acidic 
lakes in New England were found to 
be acidic before 1 850, which was prior 
to the Industrial Revolution in this 
country. 

Also, when it is time for your 
daily flag burning, I suggest you toss 
in your "abolish global warming" 
signs because here is some real sta- 
tistics that will make your tie-dyed 
shirts read "I love Nixon". Thomas 
Karl of the National Oceanographic 
and Atmospheric Administration, 
stated in a study that "...there is no 



statistically significant evidence of 
an overall increase in annual tem- 
perature or change annual precipita- 
tion for the 48 contiguous states from 
1895 to 1987." Dr. Reid Bryson, of 
the Institute of Environmental Stud- 
ies at the University of Wisconsin, 
theorized in the 1960s that sulfur 
dioxide combines with water to form 
aerosols, which brighten clouds. This 
causes them to reflect the suns heat, 
thereby cooling it and off-setting the 
Greenhouse Effect. 

In other words, while the envi- 
ronmentalist are printing up their 
shirts that read "trees are people, 
too," the polar ice caps are thicken- 
ing, not melting like they would wish 
us to believe. 

Recycling can be also counter- 
productive. While it does make eco- 
nomic sense to recycle aluminum and 
ferrous metals, recycling paper does 
not. The bleaches used to de-ink 
newspapers during recycli ng are toxic 
and present their own environmental 



hazards. 

It would be save to assume that 
in the future we can look forward to 
liberals chaining themselves to trees 
to protest the recycling of paper. 
Speaking of protesting you can toss 
your "Boycott Exxon" signs in the 
fire, too, because Alaskan fisherman 
had a record catch this year. Wouldn't 
you know it was in the same waters 
where the Exxon's Valdez acciden- 
tally ran aground. 

The counter-productiveness of 
this new social activism is beyond 
reasoning. Earth First is responsible 
for two deaths of mill workers from 
the spiking of trees. One of the most 
terrifying occurrence was when an 
Earth First member placed a 3- 
month-old baby in the path of a bull- 
dozer. On one occasion, Greenpeace 
memberswere latching onto a nuclear 
driven freighter while it was sailing 
into a British harbor. Now if the 
world would switch over to nuclear 
power, which is the cleanest and 



safest form of energy available, such with ecological anarchy, protesting 
acts of stupidity would cease to exist, and the voicing of false facts and the 

Actssimilarto these, sabotaging fabricated views of the truth. As Jay 
of equipment, chaining of people to Leno ,the new NBC "Tonight Show" 
trees and the spiking of trees accom- host, once said, "Relax people, we will 
plishes nothing except elfecting the 
workers of the companies they claim 
to be protesting. 

We must ask ourselves if the 
integrity of these people is worth the 
shoe polish on their army boots. 
Their views have been heard and 
few are deserving of a thought. 
The American public will soon 
see through the picket signs, the 
burningflag and the tie-dyed shirts 
to see the true meaning of such left- 
ist radical groups. 

Attention?, it's the "in thing 
to do?" it is a lot more fun not to 
have a job, 1 question not there 
motives but there principle and ve- 
racity. There are many ways to 
assure that our children have a 
clean world to live, but the radical 
left is only making matters worse 




PageS 



LIFESTYLE 



October 1, 



Famous duo performs to a capacity crowd 

Smothers Brothers sing, entertain crowd 



By MARIA E. JONES 
Staff Writer 

Which one of the following is 
true? 

a. Tom Smothers is a graduate of 
Northwestern State University 

b. Joan of Arc wandered through 
the forest with her band of merry 
men, cut down trees, built a big 
boat, and saved all of the animals 
from a rain storm that lasted 40 
days. 

c. Black and Decker are an old 
vaudeville team that invented the 
"What kind of dog is it?" skit. 

d. John Lennon wrote a song 
entitled "The Dog Song." 

e. None of the above but Tom 
Smothers can really tell some whop- 
pers. 

If your answer was "e" you were 
right. Tom Smothers, who is not a 
graduate of Northwestern but 
claimed it as his alma mater during 
the show, can tell a tall tale like no 
one else. 



The tables on the floor were full, 
and the bleachers were packed last 
Thursday night at Prather Coliseum 
when the Natchitoches/Northwest- 
ern Symphony opened for the 
Smothers Brothers. 

The symphony, conducted by Dr. 
George Adams, associate professor 
of music, began the show by per- 
forming three pieces. Selections 
were played from "The King and I," 
by Richard Rogers , followed by Percy 
Grainger's "Immovable Do" and 
concluded by John Williams' "Star 
Wars Medley — The Empire Strikes 
Back." 

A short intermission followed the 
symphony's performance, and 
Michael Peretti, the Smothers 
Brothers pianist, took his place at 
the piano and announced that the 
show would start in one minute. 

The announcement by Peretti 
that Rosanne Barr would replace 
one of the brothers took the audi- 
ence by surprise. While everyone 



was trying to decide if Rosanne Ban- 
would indeed be a replacement, the 
announcement that the show would 
start in two minuteswas made. Boos 
from the audience showed they were 
listening. And no, Rosanne did not 
replace anyone. 

Peretti then called security to 
the back. He said their missing gun 
had been found. No, security did 
not lose a gun. 

When "three minutes until show 
time" was announced, the audience 
suspected the Smothers Brothers 
were about to make their entrance. 
The only thing known for sure about 
the Smothers Brothers is that Tom 
never tells the truth and Dick never 
finishes a song. The audience had 
to pay attention because the dia- 
logue was fast paced and full of 
funny fibs. No one tells a tall tale 
like Tom Smothers. 

Tom explained what he and Dick 
have in common with some other 
famous brothers, such as Ernest 



and Julio Gallo, Orville and Wilbur 
Wright, and the Everly Brothers. 
People always get them mixed up, 

too. 

The younger audience, unaware 
of the format the brothers use, won- 
dered why Tom interrupted Dick 
during the opening song and why 
Dick would not cooperate when Tom 
tried to do an old Black and Decker 
comedy routine. It didn't take long 
for them to realize it was all part of 
the act. 

Dick began to sing in Spanish 
and, as usual, Tom interrupted but 
with a different twist. He went off 
on a long monologue, some words of 
which were Spanish, while others 
were pseudo-Spanish. Dick just lis- 
tened as Tom rambled on and played 
his guitar, until Tom asked, "El gato 
got-o el tongue-o?" 

Dick: "You're a pain in the a — 

Tom: "No comprendo." 

Dick told the audience Tom did 
not know how to speak Spanish. 



Tom's reply was, "El toro crap-o." 

Dick insisted Tom had no idea 
what he had just said, but Tom's 
reply proved he did. 

Dick finally did sing most of "The 
Impossible Dream," and he encour- 
aged the audience to "Fight for what 
you believe in — no matter what 
the odds. YouU be the winner." 

Tom had some wisdom of his own 
for the audience. "America was truly 
the impossible dream," Tom said. 
"Because they dreamed, others 
dreamed with them, and the history 
books were re-written. 

"Joan of Arc wandered through 
the forests with her band of merry 
followers. There were oak trees, fir 
trees and pine trees. She took the 
oak trees and made timbers, the 
pine trees and made beams, and the 
fir trees and built a big ark. 

"Then for 40 days and nights it 
rained, and she collected all the 
animals in pairs and brought them 
into the ark. People laughed at her 



because she was a woman 
builder, but today there are mj 
women who build boats than i 
because she dared to do it." 

Tom left the stage and Dick 
the audience that he and his bi 
had been performing together! 
33 years. He said their relation^ 
was like an old marriage: lots 
fights and no sex. 

Then, out came Yo-Yo Man in 
red and blue plaid shirt with yell 
suspenders. Dick Smothers assist) 
the silent Yo-Yo Man and explain 
"everything you ever wanted to km 
about the state ofYo but were afraj 
to ask." 

The mystic state of advanced' 
was demonstrated with some <B 
cult tricks. Dick explained that j) 
state of Yo a person keeps tryj 
until he get things right. 




Dick and Tom Smothers show their 
own style of humor and music. 




Dei 



sta- 



gey 
inj i 





Bill Bri 
itarter at ( 
jemonfootl 
back i 
dent, C; 
today. 
ti Britt.a* 
Lralyzed fi 
Lctors beli 




Brin- 
ies tern (2- 
tpens Sout 
lis week 
Texas. Got 
kit Friday 
"Our th« 
with Bill, 
family rig! 
was p 
y tougli 
.He's 
injuries an 
•mount of 



(it on the f 




Harry Connick Jr.'s sixth album 
is a personal statement showing the 
best of his arranging, songwriting 
and piano playing talents. The album 
follows a string of successful albums 
that have proven that this New 
Orleans native can really swing. 

"Blue Light, Red Light" stays 
constant with a particularly 
haunting big band sound that has a 
neoclassical jazz appeal. This 
neoclassical sound has been 
popularized by performers such as 
Wynton Marsalis, Roy Hargrove, 
Terrance Blanchard and Harry 
Connick Jr. The title cut sets a mood 
for the entire album that can best be 
compared to Cab Calloway or Duke 
Ellington, big band with a touch of 
classic jazz. Connick has stated in 
many interviews that the early jazz 
masters such as Calloway and 
Ellington were influences on his 
musical style and arrangements. 
Connick started his musical career 
at an early age, playing music in 
clubs along the streets of the French 
Quarter in New Orleans when he 
was barely able to see over the piano 
he was playing on. 

His self-titled first album made 
its way to the music scene with a low 
noise and was not an immediate hit, 
but it did make many heads turn. 
Connick's second album, 20, made a 
loud noise when introduced several 
years ago. Many listeners and critics 
were surprised by the age of Connick 
at the production of the album , which 
as the title explains was 20 years 
old. 20 allowed Connick to reproduce 
some of the hits and classic jazz 
favorites that he grew up learning to 
perfect. 



Note for 
Note 

Leonard A. 
Williams 

In 1989 Connick was 
commissioned by Rob Reiner to 
produce some music for his "post 
yuppie love story", "When Harry Met 
Sally..." Connick came to the call of 
duty and released an album that 
proved that Harry Connick Jr. was 
here to stay. However, the question 
remained; "Can Harry write his own 
material?" Yes he can . 

We Are In Love, and Lofty 's Roach 
Souffle, his fourth and fifth albums 
showed that Harry can do it all. He 
can write, play, arrange and sing his 
own material. 

Blue Light, Red Light, shows a 
new Harry, a swinging Harry, a more 
mature Harry. All twelve tunes have 
a sound that has been missing from 
the sound of jazz music today. The 
music of today's mainstream jazz 
musicians promote syrupy love songs 
played on the saxophone. These 
songs are not bad nor are they simple, 
but they do lack the feeling that 
John Coltrane, Miles Davis (who 
unfortunately passed away this 
previous weekend), Max Roach, and 
many other fathers of jazz music 
tried to bring out in their recording 
sessions. 

Connick introduces to new 
listeners what was popular, and to 
jazz diehards he replaces the popular 
with something new. 

Jill , is written for and about 
Connick's girlfriend and is 
reminiscent of a scene from a Frank 
Sinatra film with Sinatra standing 
under a street-light on a dark, lonely 
street holding a cigarette and toting 
a heart full of love. Connick also 
bases much of his jazz on Sinatra 
and has even been compared to "old 



BLUE LIGHT 



RED LIGHT 



I him i Connick jr. 



blue eyes". Just Kiss Me is 
comparable to Cole Porter's It's 
Alright With Me. The resounding 
trumpet and upright bass completes 
a package that is forgotten in today's 
synthesized jazz music. 

As an album, Blue Light, Red 
Light represents a mature, well- 
seasoned musician who is stable 
enough in his own abilities to make 
such timeless music, yet respected 
enough (at a ripe old age of 26) to 
know that he won't produce a flop. 
Connick writes at the end of his 
liner notes;" Thank you much for 
digging my tunes and let's Blue 
Light, Red Light all the way to the 
top! Swingfully, Harry." 



Homecoming Festival Follies 
Wednesday, October 16, 1991 
3:00pm, ROTC Fields 

First 25 Teams To Enter By 
Friday, October 1 1th 
Will Receive FREE Homecoming T-Shirts 



6 per*«« 



team 9 



HARRY (.ON NICK. JR. 



IMS;;; 

IE LIGH;J 



Featuring: 
Blue Light, Red 
Light You Didn't 
Know Me When * 
Jill %' Just Kiss Me 

On COLUMBIA tapes, ami 
compact discs 



GAMES :7 ^***** 

Pie In The Face Contest - Airplane Toss - 3-Legged Race 
}lash - Water Pail Relay - Obstacle .Course 
)ver & Under Balloon Rela*! 

PRIZES 

1st Place -$100.00 
lace - $50.00 — 3rd Place - $ 

\\* More Info. Call 3461 or 631 1 

GET SOAKED III 




For the best in Entertainment, 
Music, Movies, and just plain fun. 



LIFESTYLE 



Every week in the Current Sauce. 



ATTENTION 

ALL Students, Faculty & Staff 

The Leisure Activities Department 
is now offering (FREE OF CHARGE) 
A Drop In 
"Low Impact Aerobics Class" 

Intramural /Rec Building 
Monday - Wednesday - Friday 

4:45 and 5:45 Classes 

Classes Begin Wednesday, October 2nd 
For Additional Info. Call 357-546 1 
To Register for the class call or stop by the 
Leisure Activities Office Rm 10, IM/Rec Building 





»ber 1, ij 



jdper Sports 

pemons To Battle Eagles, 
page 4 



a woman 
there are 
boats than 
to do it." 
;e and Dick 
1 andhisbroi 
ag together { 
eir relation^ 




Editorial 

Northwestern 
Enquirer, page 6 



Lifestyle 

'Man In The Moon' 
Reviewed, page 8 





Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

October 8, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 10 



Northwestern State University 



arriage: lots 

Yo-Yo Man 
hirt with yel). 
nothers assist) 
n and explain, 
-wanted to km 
> but were aft^ 

s of advanced] 
with some rjj 
plained that in 
on keeps tryj 
right. 



ers show their 
nd music. 



pemon 
starter 
severely 
injured 




l 



Race 




gill Britt, a senior two-year 
jjjrter at offensive guard for the 
,mon football team , suffered a bro- 
back in a weekend hunting 
icddent, Coach Sam Goodwin said 
lunday. 

Britt, a Magnolia, Ark. native, is 
i8ralyzed from the waist down, and 
joctors believe the damage is per- 
manent, said 
Goodwin. 
Britt, on 
course to 
graduate next 
spring in wild- 
life manage- 
ment, was in- 
jured when he 
fell from a deer 
stand. 

North- 
western (2-2 ) was idle Saturday and 
Ipens Southland Conference play 
lis week at home against North 
Texas. Goodwin cancelled practice 
last Friday and Saturday. 

"Our thoughts and prayers are 
with Bill, his wife Kelli and his 
family right now," said Goodwin. 
"Bill was probably the most men- 
tally tough player we had on the 
team. He's battled through so many 
injuries and showed a tremendous 
amount of courage at times just to 
jet on the field and play with a bad 
•boulder or leg. 

"I've never seen a guy tougher in 
fet regard than Bill. He's going to 
P>ttle this and get the most of what- 
*"er situation he's in," said Goodwin. 

Many of Britt's teammates were 
unaware of the accident until they 
"turned Sunday evening for a con- 
ditioning workout. He is among a 
16-member senior class on the team. 

"ItH have an affect on our mo- 
ll. Bill's a well-liked and highly 
^Pected fifth-year senior," said 
"°°dwin . "Some of the players found 
"M about it yesterday, and four of 
"^U went down and saw him." 

Britt was in the intensive care 
"tit Sunday night at Our Lady of 
Lake Hospital in Baton Rouge. 
1 Britt sat out the Demons' last 
«, a win over East Texas, after 
aining his knee in practice and 
Aggravating the injury by slip- 
-on his kitchen floor. 

His loss is the third non-football 
"'ated incident to cost the Demons 
{Player in the last three weeks, 
^or wingback Lawann Latson 
• J* emergency surgery for a mild 
7^ a two weeks ago, and sopho- 
^ fe defensive end Marcus Crider 
an emergency appendectomy 
^Saturday. 

v^he accident puts additional 
f^sure on the offensive guard po- 
"* 0r >, where four other players have 
at least one game with inju- 




Campus Police recovered $50,000 in stolen goods from Northwestern, Northeastern, and the Natchitoches Country Club 



Campus Police apprehend suspect 

Former NSU student charged 
with 12 counts of burglary 



By MARIA E. JONES 

Staff Writer 

Former Northwestern student, 
Richard Scott, 22, of 1710 N. Wil- 
liams Ave., was arrested by North- 
western Police Sept. 30, and charged 
with 12 counts of burglary after 
police recovered equipment that was 
valued at approximately $50,000. 

Northeast Louisiana University 
police also are expected to file 
charges against Scott for the al- 
leged theft of equipment stolen from 
their campus in Monroe. 

Detective Sgt. Doug Prescott of 
the Northwestern Police obtained a 
search warrant and was assisted by 
detectives from the Natchitoches 
Police and the Natchitoches Sheriff s 
office in a search of Scott's resi- 
dence, a storage building which he 
rented and a residence in Monroe. 

Police confiscated blank keys and 
a machine to copy keys along with 
the stolen objects. 

Equipment that was recovered 
included two Macintosh computers 
stolen from Northwestern, a video 
camera and television stolen from 



NLU, an air compressor and six golf 
cart batteries valued at approxi- 
mately $1,000 from the Natchi- 
toches Country Club and approxi- 
mately $4,000 worth of compact 
disks and video tapes stolen from 
merchants in the Natchitoches area. 

Prescott said the equipment will 
be returned to the departments from 
where it was stolen as soon as it is 
photographed and assigned catalog 
serial numbers. The photographs 
will be used in court unless it is 
necessary for the items to be physi- 
cally present. The serial numbers 
on the items will verify that it is the 
same property. 

Scott attended Scholars' College, 
was a member of Kappa Kappa Psi 
and the Spirit of Northwestern 
Marching Band. 

Scott was working at Mayfield 
Printing and Office Equipment at 
the time of his arrest. 

One of the Macintosh computers 
recovered was stolen from the NSU 
press office in early June according 
to director/coordinator Tom 
Gresham. Prescott conducted the 



investigation at the time of the theft 
which included fingerprints, photo- 
graphs of the scene and the collec- 
tion of evidence. 

Gresham said he had a call from 
the police on Oct. 1 , duri ng which he 
was told the computer had been 
recovered, and it appeared to be in 
good condition. 

"I have been very impressed with 
Doug Prescott, the investigator, and 
the work that he's done, the investi- 
gation, the way it proceeded work 
ing in our office." Gresham said. 
"He just seems like he really is a 
top-notch policeman and I think 
Northwestern is really lucky to have 
him on the staff of our University 
Police." 

Prescott said he previously had 
talked to Scott two or three times 
and had other leads that resulted in 
police obtaining the search warrant . 

Bond for Scott was set at a hear- 
ing on Oct. 2, at $10,000. Scott was 
released after posting bond. A date 
for his arraignment has not been set 
because the case is still under inves 
tigation. 



Court rules Gowland 
violated Election Code 



By MICHELLE GENRE 

News Editor 

Members of the Student Govern- 
ment Association's Supreme Court 
ruled that Beth Gowland, vice presi- 
dent of the SGA, was in violation of 
the Election Code in a hearing held 
on Oct. 2. 

The Court found that Gowland 
infringed Article V, Section 1.5.4 of 
the Election Code, which says that 
the duties of the board include "op- 
eration of the polls with the assis- 
tance of SGA members not running 
in the election." 

Gowland, a 1991 Homecoming 
Court member, was accused of vio- 
lating Article V, Sectionl.3.4 and 
Section 1.5.4. by Henrietta Collins, 
a senior from Transylvania, La. 

Collins brought the violation be- 
fore the Court after witnessing 
Gowland's actions on Sept. 19 in 
Iberville Cafeteria. Collins claimed 
that Gowland assisted with the elec- 
tion polls after members of the Elec- 
tion Board failed to arrive on time to 
work at the election tables. Gowland 
argued she had to fulfill her duty as 
vice president of the SGA, which is 
to oversee all student body elections 
if the need arises. 

"Given the same situation, I 
would probably make the same de- 
cision again. I don't think what I 
did was wrong," said Gowland. "At 
the time, I felt I had to make the 
decision I made." 

According to the Supreme Court's 
decision, "A constitutional conflict 
that required Gowland to perform 
her duties as vice president of SGA 
while also being a candidate in the 
election, and a seemingly ill-pre- 
pared and irresponsible Election 



Board, caused Gowland to be placed 
in what should have been an avoid- 
able and unnecessary situation." 

To prevent this event from hap- 
pening again, the Court believes 
that the constitutional problem 
should be addressed and amended 
by the senate. After these actions 
are done, the Court will review the 
changes. 

Though encouraged by her peers 
to take the case further to Dr. Rob- 
ert Alost, president of Northwest- 
ern, Collins is happy with the ruling 
and feels that Gowland should not 
be excluded from the Homecoming 
Court. Collins said that she wanted 
to inform students that sometimes 
rules get violated without the knowl- 
edge of the student body, and also to 
set a precedent for future elections. 

"Since God is supreme, I feel that 
He is going to take it as far as He 
wants. God will justify it with Beth," 
said Collins, a 1991 Homecoming 
Court nominee. 

Gowland was also satisfied with 
the Court's ruling. 

"I felt the decision was fair, and 
I was pleased with it. The judges 
acted in a very fair and unbiased 
way," said Gowland. 

Gowland and Collins both agreed 
that there were no hard feelings 
between the two of them. 

In a final ruling by the Supreme 
Court, the Court commended Collins 
for being informed of her student 
rights and acting upon them. They 
also encouraged more students to 
take such an active role in their 
student government. 

Members of the SGA Supreme 
Court include Lisa Beard, Stan 
■ Please see Court on page 3 



Debate team competes 



By LEIGH FLYNN 

Staff Writer 

Northwestern's debate team re- 
cently participated in two tourna- 
ments that proved "they are a bet- 
ter team than last year," according 
to Todd Graham, director of debate. 

The team's first competition was 
held at the University of South Caro- 
lina. The tournament consisted of a 
regular, as well as round-robin, de- 
bate. 

"Only nine of the best teams in 
the country were asked to partici- 
pate in the round-robin, so it was 
great to be asked," said Graham. 

The regular tournament at South 
Carolina proved successful for the 
entire squad. All of the debaters in 
the junior varsity division were 
awarded individual speaker tro- 
phies. Jason Trice captured the 
second speaker award, while Molly 
Hammond earned third speaker 
recognition. Bryan Racer received 
the award for fourth speaker, and 
Marcus Foote was named sixth 
speaker. 

Hammond and Trice remained 
the top-seeded team in junior var- 
sity until the final round. They 
placed second overall. Racer and 



Foote tied for third in the tourna- 
ment, losingin the semi-finals. Both 
teams lost to Columbia University. 

The varsity teams also fared well 
in competition. Jason Foote was 
named ninth speaker overall. He 
and his partner, Sean Lemoine, en- 
tered the finals rounds as the top- 
seeded team. They lost in quarter- 
finals to Emory. 

Northwestern's other varsity 
team, Buddy Hays and Brad Rob- 
erts, lost in the quarter-finals to 
UCLA, who was ranked second in 
the country last year. 

Last weekend, the team traveled 
to the University of Missouri at St. 
Louis. Only three of the four two- 
person teams attended the tourna- 
ment. Trice received the individual 
award for 10th speaker. He and his 
partner, Hammond, captured fifth 
place in the junior varsity division. 

The two varsity teams, consist- 
ing of Lemoine and Jason Foote and 
Hays and Roberts, both lost in the 
octa-finals round. 

"The team seems more prepared 
and better organized this year. Last 
year we ranked 21st. This year, our 
goal is to be in the top 10," said 
Graham. 



Inside 




[ i; S5Tp us Connection 
Norials 



2_ 
3 




I ^ in Brief 



^tipn Coverage 



Sports 



6 

JT 
2 

7_ 

_4 
7 



ling 



^l r s to the Editor 

Vfy ent Newspaper 

)j u 0n hwestern State University 

^ ^toches, Louisiana 



^ertising 357-5456 




State college enrollment rises 
Figures climb according to Regents' predictions 



For the second consecutive year, 
the state's colleges and universities 
posted a hike in enrollment. The 
enrollment rose 6.3 percent over 
last fall, ranging from a high of 24 
percent to a low of 1 .4 percent based 
on preliminary and unofficial fig- 
ures released by the Board of Re- 
gents last week. 

Initial figures show a total of 
164,054 students enrolled statewide 
in the public institutions of higher 
education, an increase of 9,659 stu- 
dents over fall of 1990 . 

All but two of the public institu- 
tions showed increases with the 
greatest jumps at three of the two- 
year colleges. Delgado Community 
College gained the most, up 24 per- 
cent, followed by Louisiana State 
University at Eunice at 13 percent 



and Louisiana State University at 
Alexandria at 1 1.5 percent, accord- 
ing to Dr. Sammie Cosper, commis- 
sioner of higher education. 

"A number of factors contributed 
to this overall statewide increase," 
the commissioner explained, "such 
as a greater awareness of students' 
parts of the value of a higher educa- 
tion, better recruiting by the insti- 
tutions generally, better retention 
of those students recruited, more 
adults returning to further their 
educations and, of course, a larger 
birth pool." 

The colleges and universities re- 
port their 14th-class-day enroll- 
ments to the regents, except for 
Louisrana Tech, which operates on 
the quarter rather than the semes- 
ter system, and it reports its 9th- 



class-day figures. 

"Because these are preliminary 
and unofficial figures there will be 
some variation between these fig- 
ures and those final figures reported 
to us," Cosper said. "However, those 
variances are usually insignificant." 

The regents projected that en- 
rollments would begin a gradual 
upward climb as the state entered 
the decade of the 1990s, and "these 
figures indicate that our projections 
are on target," Cosper said. 

He said -that the increases in 
enrollment should be construed in 
"the most positive light, but we 
should not lose sight of the fact that 
we must find a way to have more of 
these students finish their degrees 
and graduate." 



Tl 




Source: Board of Regents 
Fall 1991 enrollments reflect 14th class day (or equivalent) enrollment. 



Page 2 



Calendar 
of Events 



today 

Intramural Flag Football 

7 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features 
Mortal Thoughts in The Alley 

WEDNESDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 

7:30 p.m. 

Lady Demon Volleyball 

Lady Demons vs. Southern in 
Prather Coliseum 

THURSDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 

11 a.m. 

Pep Rally at the Student Union 

Suzannah Davis, local author 
will speak at the Scholars' Col- 
lege in room 207. 

FRIDAY 

Final Day to Drop a Course 
BSU Fall Convention 

SATURDAY 

10K Thirst Quencher 
Invitational 

Family Day 

3 p.m. 

Tailgate Party at Prather Coli- 
seum parking lot 

7 p.m. 

Demon Football 

The Demons play North Texas in 
Turpin Stadium 

MONDAY 

Intramural Flag Football 

SAB Homecoming Treasure 
Hunt 

SAB Homecoming Hunnies 
Star Search 



Job interviews 

On Monday, Oct. 14, the 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife 
and Fisheries Enforcement 
Division will be interviewing 
students for law enforcement 
positions. Anyone with at least 
two years of college can sign up to 
interview. 

On Friday, Oct. 18, K-Mart 
Corporation will be interviewing 
students with either a liberal arts 
or business degree for positions in 
their management trainee 
program. 

Anyone interested in signing up 
for either one of these two jobs 
should come by room 305 of the 
Student Union. Watch for posters 
around campus announcing the 
companies coming to 
Northwestern to interview 
seniors. 

Library association to meet 

The Louisiana Chapter of the 
Association of Colleges and 
Universities and the Academic 
Section of the Louisiana Library 
Association will hold a joint 
meeting on Thursday, Oct. 17. 
The meeting will begin at 9:30 
a.m. in the Cammie Henry 
Research Center of Watson 
Library. 

The meeting topic will be 
"Environmental Impact: The 
Library as Microcosm and 
Motivator." 

Susan Hocker of the 
American Library Association's 
Benton Foundation will deliver 
the keynote address. 

Other scheduled speakers 
include Rutson Bernard of the 
University of Southwestern 
Louisiana on "Facility 
Management and Planning: A 
Decision Tree Approach;" Douglas 
Harrison of the Louisiana State 
Archives on "Preserving Library 
Materials in the Library 
Environment;" and Sheryl Moore 
of the University of Southwestern 
Louisiana on "Informational 
Resources on the Environment." 

A panel discussion, "Some 
Things Libraries Can Do to Save 
the Earth," will be held in the 
afternoon. The panel will include 



News In Brief 




Tony Means 

Clyde Holloway, the Republican nominee for governor, spoke to students and 
faculty while on a campaign stop in Natchitoches on Oct. 2. 



Lenora Lockett of Delgado 
Community College, Danny 
Dipetta of Waste Management of 
Alexandria and Vince Sagnabene 
of the Louisiana Department of 
Environmental Quality. 

The business session will 
begin at 3 p.m. Kevin Curria of 
Louisiana Tech, president of the 
Louisiana Chapter of the 
Association of College Research 
Libraries, will preside. 

Those interested in attending 
should contact Gayle Poirier, 
Middleton Library, LSU, Baton 
Rouge, La. 70803 or Charlene 
Cain, LSU Law Library at (504) 
388-4957. 

Simpson discusses papers 

Dr. Claude Simpson, associate 
professor of business, delivered 
two papers at the International 
Association of Computer 
Information Systems annual 
meeting held in San Francisco. 

The first paper "Electronic 
Spreadsheets: Which Ones to 
Teach" was co-authored with 
Northwestern assistant professor 
of business Dr. Walter Creighton. 
The secosd study is entitled 
"Technology Management: A 



Prototyping Model." 

In preparing the paper, 
Simpson and Creighton surveyed 
presidents and secretaries of local 
chapters of the National 
Association of Accountants to find 
which spreadsheets they preferred 
students to use in college. 

"This was the first study 
anyone could find where 
professional accountants were 
asked which spreadsheets they 
preferred students to use," said 
Simpson. "It was no surprise that 
they said Lotus 1-2-3." 

Simpson said one surprise 
about the study was that 
accountants said more training in 
spreadsheets needs to be done. 
The respondents advised that 
spreadsheets be used in almost 
every accounting course and that 
students be required to attain 
computer literacy before 
graduation. 

Simpson concluded in the 
second paper that computer 
systems must be designed for the 
end user in order to adequately 
serve the user. He said the user 
has to be involved through the 
development of the system. That 
seems to be the only appropriate 



method of system development, he 
said. 

Luncheons to begin Oct. 16 

The Student Personnel 
Association of Northwestern and 
Student Support Services of 
Northwestern will present a series 
of brown bag luncheons beginning 
Wednesday, Oct. 16. The 
luncheons will feature guest 
speakers who will discuss 
problems and issues concerning 
non-traditional students. Non- 
traditional students are considered 
23 years or older, married, single 
or divorced, who are continuing or 
considering furthering their 
education at the university level. 

On Oct. 16, Diane Snowden, 
certified social worker, will 
present "Anxieties of the Non- 
traditional Student." On 
Wednesday, Oct. 23, Gil Gilson, 
director of Financial Aid, will 
present "Dealing with Financial 
Matters in College." On 
Wednesday, Oct. 30, Francis 
Conine, director of Career 
Planning and Counseling, will 
present "Career Choices, 
Enhancement and Advancement." 

The lectures will be held from 
noon to 12:50 p.m. in the Cane 
River Room of the Student Union. 
There is no admission, and soft 
drinks will be provided. Door 
prizes will be awarded. For more 
information, contact Gail Jones at 
357-5901. 

AT&T to challenge students, 
educators 

The fourth annual AT&T 
Collegiate Challenge, which will 
begin Nov. 1, will allow educators 
and students the opportunity to 
prove their ability in the stock 
market. 

The objective of each player is 
to build the earnings of a personal 
account while testing their 
knowledge of Wall Street. 

Competing for over $200,000 
in cash prizes, undergraduate and 
graduate and faculty may 
participate. 

The entry fee is $49.95, and 
anyone interested can call 1-800- 
545-1970 to enter. 




October 8, ^ 

Current 
Sauce 



tober8 




P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71497 

(UPS 140 - 6601 



How to reach the Sauc* 

To subscribe to The Sauce 

Subscriptions 357 -52i; 



To place an ad 

Local ads 
National ads 



357-545, 
357-52,, 



Question about billing 

Sales Manager 357-54$; 
Business Manager 357-52lj 

To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 357-545s 

Editorial/Opinion 357-509; 

Lifestyles 357-545( 

News 357-5455 

Photography 357-5293 

Sports 357-5455 



The Current Sauce is located^ 
the Office of Student Publication^ 
225 Kyser Hall. 

The Current Sauce is published 
every week during the fall by the 
students of North western State Unj. 
versity of Louisiana. It is not assod- 
ated with any of the university's^ 
partments and is financed indepej. 
dently. 

The deadline for all advertise, 
ments is 5 p.m. the Thursday be- 
fore publication. 

Inclusion of any and all mate- 
rial is left to the discretion of the 
editor. 

The Current Sauce will not It 
printed on November 26, 1991 dueto 
the university's Thanksgiving Holi- 
day. 

The Current Sauce is enteredai 
second-class mail at Natchitocha, 
LA. 



ca mP us C 

Thefollov 

t turned ii 
fall semestei 
comply an 
forfeit of ch 
froffl the un 
gtee Orgam 
! ha Lambd 
pelta, Anim 
ijsociation 
iggociation 
Alpha Kapp 
yupha, Chu 
pevotional, 
peutscher 1 
forestry an 
Club, Fello\ 
jetes, Geolo; 
Lambda De 
H Cercle 
Home Econ 
Student A: 
Studies Ch 
jjSU Bowli 
masters, PI 
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gpsilon Ka 
Beta Lamb 
Student Ft 
Team, Stu< 

Romai 
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Judy Vincent, Owner 



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COSMETICS 
105 Broadmoor Shopping Center 
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(318) 352-3816 

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Suzannal 
dozen histor 
romance no^ 
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Thursday ir 
Hall. Her pi 
■Getting Stai 
Davis, of l 
the romance 
habits and h 
published. P 
followed by i 
session. 

Davis be 
fiction for fui 
seriously afl 
at Northeas 
versity giver 
siana authoi 
A cum la 
I Louisiana S 
program, T)t 
novel, No F 
Published b 
Avon, her ti' 
Passion, Urn 
Devil's Mor 
which is set 
Her book 
into nine 1; 
Deception v 
torical of 19' 
magazine. 

Davis wi 
Avon Books 
newly-expa 
"Avon's Rc 
Dance of D 
year, will b< 
lew series. 

Davis' le 
the series C< 
Writers, spr 
College. 
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itober8,l9| ^tober 8, 1991 



NEWS 



Page 3 



irren 
auce 



>x 5306 

itate University 
youisiana 71497 



h the Sau<*. 

o The Sauce 

357-52,3 



357-545( 
357-52,3 

t billing 

357-545{ 
ier 357-52,3 

news 

:tion 357-5455 1 
357-50$ 
357-545{ 
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Sauce is locatedj, 
mt Publications) 



Sauce is published 
lg the fall by Hj 
western State Uni- 
la. It is not aasocj. 
he university's de. 
financed indepa. 



s for all advertise- 
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Sauce will notk 
ber26, 1991dueti 
hanksgiving Holi- 



^VMPUS CONNECTION 



Sauce is ente red it 
at Natchitoch^ 



address changes to 
D. Box 5306, NSU, 
S, LA 71497. 
nt Sauce 



7 



r a inpu s Organizations 

-j^e following organizations have 
t turned in renewal cards for the 
? \\ semester and have one week to 

,j,plete and turn them in or risk 
frfeit of charter and recognition 
the university: Associate De- 
\Lg Organization of Students, Al- 
^ a Lambda Delta, Alpha Kappa 
nglta, Animal Health Technicians, 
Association for Children Under Six, 
Association for Student Artists, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Baachus, Chi 
Alpha, Church of Christ Student 
nevotional, Council of Ye Revels, 
peutscher Club, Delta Sigma Pi, 
forestry and Wildlife Conservation 
Club, Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes, Geological Club, Images, Iota 
Lambda Delta, Kappa Omicron Nu, 
La Cercle Francais, Los Amigos, 
jIom e Economics Association, LDS 
Student Association, Meditative 
Studies Club, Mu Epsilon Delta, 
fjSU Bowling Team, NSU Toast- 
masters, Phi Delta Kappa, Purple 
jackets- Warrington Campus, Phi 
gpsilon Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi 
jjeta Lambda, Psi Chi, Pentecostal 
Student Fellowship-Internl, Rifle 
Team, Student Council for Excep- 



Romance writer 
to speak at LSC 



Suzannah Davis, author of a 
dozen historical and contemporary 
romance novels, will speak at the 
Scholars' College at 11 a.m. on 
Thursday in room 207 of Russell 
Hall- Her presentation is entitled 
"Getting Started in Popular Fiction." 

Davis, of Coushatta, will discuss 
the romance genre, her own writing 
habits and how to get one's writing 
published. Her presentation will be 
followed by a question and answer 
session. 

Davis began writing romantic 
fiction for fun in 1976. but took it up 
seriously after attending a course 
at Northeast Louisiana State Uni- 
versity given by a well-known Loui- 
siana author Jennifer Blake. 

A cum laude graduate from the 
Louisiana State University honors 
program, Davis published her first 
novel, No Bed of Roses, in 1984. 
Published by Dell, Harlequin and 
Avon, her titles include Prisoner of 
Passion, Untamed Glory , Airwaves, 
Devil's Moon and Evening Star, 
which is set in Natchitoches. 
1 Her books have been translated 
into nine languages, and Devil's 
Deception was named "Best His- 
torical of 1990" by Affaire de Coeur 
magazine. 

Davis was recently chosen by 
Avon Books to be a part of their 
newly-expanded historical line, 
"Avon's Romantic Treasurers." 
Dance of Deception, due out next 
year, will be one of the first in this 
new series. 

Davis' lectur e will be the first of 
the series Contemporary Louisiana 
Writers, sponsored by the Scholars' 
College 

"This series will give people at 
toe Scholars' College, the larger 
"diversity and the Natchitoches 
""nmunity the opportunity to meet 
Published authors currently living 
'"d working in Louisiana. Aspiring 
Writers especially should find these 
"formal presentations of interest," 
^dDr. Fraser Snowden, coordina- 
tor of the Contemporary Louisiana 
Writers program. 

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K., 



St«L_ 



tional Children, Student Nurses 
Association, Sigma Alpha Iota, Stu- 
dent Action League and Young 
Democrats. 

Organizational leaders also need 
to stop by room 214 of the Student 
Union and make sure that they have 
an active post office box on campus. 

Nursing Students 

There will be an SNA meeting at 
4 p.m. on Thursday in room 123 of 
Fournet Hall. Officers will be 
elected, and plans for the Home- 
coming float and the Halloween 
Party will be made. 

Phi Beta Lambda 

Phi Beta Lambda will have a 
meeting at 11 a.m. on Thursday in 
room 102 of the Business building. 
The guest speaker will be Shawn 
Daily, an investment broker with 
A.G. Edwards & Sons. 

Phi Mu 

The Phi Mu meeting will be held 
at 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Hag foot- 
ball players should meet on the field 
at 3 p.m. for the game on Wednes- 
day. 



The social service committee will 
have a meeting at 7 p.m. today. 

There will be a chapter develop- 
ment at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Phi 
Mu house. Bills are due by Nov. 3. 

Pre-Law Ciub 

A Pre-Law Club, sponsored by 
the Department of Social Sciences, 
has been formed and will meet once 
a month. Mitch Moran and Candace 
Bankovich are co-presidents and 
will hold the first meeting of the 
club at 1 p.m. on Wednesday in 
room 309 of Kyser Hall. At this 
meeting additional officers will be 
elected, and guest speakers will in- 
form interested students about the 
Law School Aptitude Test. At the 
conclusion of the meeting, a door 
prize will be awarded. If you have 
any questions about the club, call 
Dr. Maxine Taylor at 357-6195. 



Purple Jackets 

All Purple Jackets need to pick 
up Homecoming raffle tickets from 
Tammy Clary at room 126 of 
Varnado Hall. Also, if members 
would like to work Family Day from 



11 a.m. to 2 p.m., call Clary at 357- 
5005. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 

The Alpha Zeta chapter of Sigma 
Sigma Sigma won several national 
awards at the Regional Alumnae 
Collegiate Conference held last 
weekend in Shreveport. Alpha Zeta 
won the Public Relations Award, 
the Chapter Prepared Program 
Award and the Triangle Award. 
Individual awards for Triangle cor- 
respondence went to Elizabeth 
McDavid Harris and Terra Wil- 
liams. 

The project committee will meet 
at 6 p.m. today. Pledge review board 
will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on 

Wednesday and Thursday. The sis- 
terhood committee will meet at 5:30 
p.m. on Wednesday in Jennifer 
Whitford's room. An exchange 
with Kappa Sigma will be held at 9 
p.m. on Thursday. 

Composite pictures will be taken 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday. 
Big Sis/ Lil Sis will be held on Fri- 
day night, beginning at 6 p.m. Maps 
to Anjanette Lee's camp house will 



be at the house. 
Social Work 

There will be a Social Work meet- 



ing at 5 p.m. today in room 333 of 
Kyser Hall. There will be a guest 
speaker. 



Court: Gowland violates code 



■ Continued from page 1 
Broome, Stephanie Causey, Mor- 
gan Collins, Blair Dickens, Mitch 
Moran and Steve McGovern, chief 
justice. All were in agreement 
with the ruling except for Justice 
Moran. 

Moran stated that Gowland also 
violated Article V, Section 1.3.4., 
which states that "any member of 
the Election Board who wishes to 
run in an election during their 
term cannot serve on the Election 
Board for that election." He also 
asked for harsher punishment for 



Gowland's actions. 

Moran, the opposing voice, said 
Gowland's actions were unaccept- 
able and questioned her ability to 
effectively delegate authority. 

"I am of the opinion that Eliza- 
beth Gowland should receive more 
than the reprimand handed down 
by the majority. Gowland should 
be given the choice of remaining 
vice president or serving on the 
Homecoming Court. When faced 
with conflicting interests, one must 
decide between them. Actions do 
have consequences," said Moran. 




c °u pon To: Sehol»r»hlp S»rvleo 
P.O. Bo* S071 
Shrfvtport, LA 7113S | 



Intramural Volleyball 

Men - Women - Co -Recreational Divisions 

First 20 Teams To Enter Receive 
FREE Leisure Activities Squeeze Bottles 

Registration Deadline 
Wednesday, October 23, 1991, 5:00pm 
Leisure Activities Office, Room 10, Intramural/Rec Building 

Team Captains Meeting 
Wednesday, October 23, 1991 
7:00pm Room 1 14, Intramural /Recreation Building 

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Marjorie Stephens 




Police Jury- 
District 4 



Marjorie Stephens, announces her 
candidacy for the Natchitoches Parish Police 
Jury-District 4. Mrs. Stephens, wife of 
Harold Stephens, is native of England. She 
has resided in the Parish of Natchitoches for 
over twenty years. She has two children and 
two grandchildren. She is a legal assistant to 
Judee Marvin F. Gahagan, and has been 
employed by the law firm of Gahagan & 
Gahagan for the past twelve years. Mrs. 
Stephens has been in the legal field for the 
past thirty, years having worked for several 
prominent law firms in Louisiana. Mrs. 
Stephens feels that she is well qualified for 
the position as Jury Member because of her 
long association with legal work and will not 
be afraid to raise her voice to see that the 
interests of her constituents are upheld. "I 
feel that Parish Government is a civic duty 
and should be performed without recompense, 
with the exception of out of pocket expenses, 
and I will work to this end." 

'There is too much waste in all phases of 
government spending at the present time 
and on the parish level . I will do my best 
to reduce this." 



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NOVEMBER 30TH 

"Tell Your friends how good it is" 



352-1555 
247 Keyser 
Natchitoches 



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in 

CO 




LEON'S 

Old Fashion Hamburgers 

Open Monday thru Saturday 
10am- 10pm 
and 
Sundays 
3pm-10pm 




I 



« 



STUDENT ALERT! 

Piice 
Buster 

Leon's "Famous Basket" 
Large Hamburger, 
Fries and Coke 
$2.89 

Pick-up, Drive-in 
or Sit Down 
Phone Orders 357-0210 

Price 

Why pay more at the 
Student Union? 
Compare and Save! 
No coupon Needed! 
Ask for the "Buster" 

Buster 




Large Breakfasl 




3.25 


(Eggs, H;K.on and S..'_-«tj 


t. 'ir Toast) 




Sausage l'iscuii 




.99 


drilled llnnoy U:m 




60 


Pancakes (7) 




2.10 


(Wiih choice of R:k i ii or 


Sausage) 




LUNCH 


Reg. 


Ljx DHL 


Hamburger 


1.59 


1.79 2.55 


Cheeseburger 


1.69 


1.99 2.7J 


Bacon C/Burger 


2.35 


2.65 2.85 


BBQ (Chipped Bc-H 


1.80 




B.L.T. 


1.75 




Homemade Meat Pics ' 


1.35 




Hot Dog 


.95 




Com Dog 


1.00 




Hot Link 


.95 




Chili Dog 


1.25 




Chicken Cheese Sind 


1.95 




Roast Beef 


225 




Tac: Salad 


3 49 




Ham-N-Chcesc. 


2.25 




Grilled Chicken Sand 


1.95 




Ribcyc Samlwiih 


3.95 




Chef Salad 


3.25 




Steak Sandwich 


1.85 




Chicken Sandwich 


1.50 




Po Boy/ Ham or lierf 


2.50 




S1PEOPUEBS 


Iks. 


Lrg. 


French t ries 


.70 


.95 


Cajun Fi ics 


1.10 


1.25 


F Onion Rinp* 
Curly Q's 


1.25 


.95 




Tator Tois 


.85 


1.10 


Hoi Gumbo 


1.75 


Hoi Chili 


1.75 




Hoi Boudin 


1.25 




Red Beans not! Ri, e 


2.95 




FiiioPies * 
Chili Fries 


1.50 
1.75 




Chips 


.50 




N.ichos 


.99 




MEALDEATJ? 






KxTiMmJ 


139 




(Hamburger, bin, * Drink) 




Ribeye Dinner 


09 




Meal Pie Dinner 


3J0 
3J0 




Chicl.cn Strip Dinner ^ 




Csifah Dinner 


SQS 




(Cole Slaw. Hush Puppies. * Frier.) 




Burger Basket 


JJ0 




Shrimp Basket 


3.95 




Steak Finger Basket 


3J0 




BEVERAGEf} 


Sm. 


Bet. Lib 


Tea. Coke. Diet Coke. Orange, 




Dr. Pepper 


.70 


11 IM 


Milk 

HotCotTee 




IjOO 

23 

AS 

Si ISO 
AS 1j00 


Hot Cocoa 




Milk Shakes 
Frelh Lemonade 


.70 


Ice 




39 


DESSERTS 






Cheese Cake(l slice) 


1.10 
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MO 




Funnel Cake 




\ Mom's Cinnamon Roll 





r 



Page 4 



October 8, 199 



SUPER SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 



Central Florida 31, Arkansas St. 20 

Nevada 54, Idaho 23 

Colorado St. 23, UTEP 18 

East Texas St. 51, Central Okalhoma 21 



McNeese 21, Nicholls St. 3 
Northeast 17, Southwest Texas 8 
Youngstown St. 16, SFA 9 



Demons prepare to open SLC play against North Texa^ 



By PAUL PARKER 

Staff Writer 

After last week's open date, the 
Northwestern Demons (2-2-0) find 
themselves ready to start Southland 
Conference play. 

NSU plays the University of 
North Texas (1-2-1), who also has 



yet to play any conference games, 
this Saturday at Turpin Stadium. 
Last time on the field, UNT tied 
Southwest Missouri 21-21. They will 
now play seven consecutive 
conference games to finish their 
regular season. Northwestern also 
plays all conference opponents until 
their regular season comes to a close. 



As always, certain individuals 
from each school will need big games 
if their team is to share in the SLC 
lead, and each team is armed with 
players that can supply the big play 
when needed. 

The last time each team played, 
the Southland Conference gave 



Rodeo Team opens season 



By BOB WEATHERS 

Staff Writer 

The NSU Rodeo Team recently 
traveled to Mount Pleasant, Texas, 
for hot competition in the second 
annual Southeast Texas Commu- 
nity College Rodeo. 

Most of the team competed in the 
part of the rodeo called "slack," which 
is held after the main performance. 
Slack runs late into the night and 
sometimes into the morning. 

Shane "Two Feets" Lewis, a fresh- 
man from Alexandria, and Penny 
Williams , a freshman from Pineville, 
competed in the team roping. Wil- 
liams knew she had to push the 
barrier to get a good start if she and 
Lewis were to make the short go, a 
competition between the top 10 con- 
testants. 

Williams headed her steer and 
turned him like a pro with Lewis 
ready to catch. He doubled (roped 
both hind legs) but a wrap from his 



dally, the process of wrapping the 
rope around the saddle horn, slipped 
which resulted in the steer getting 
one leg free. This added five sec- 
onds to the time, with another 10 
seconds added from a barrier bro- 
ken by Williams. 

"Penalties killed us, we should 
have made the short go, but well 
make it at the next one, this just 
wasn't our night," said Lewis. 

Lewis also team roped with a 
cowboy from McNeese, who missed 
his steer giving them a no-time. 

Williams also competed in break- 
away calf roping, where it's luck of 
the draw on the calves. Williams 
drew a speedster that could have 
out run anybody, and she was no 
exception. She did, however, man- 
age to throw a loop before he got 
away. 

"I threw everything I had in my 
hand, and it only reached his back. 
That calf was fast," said Williams. 



Candy Carol, a freshman from 
Florien, and Williams both com- 
peted in barrel racing. Carol had a 
smooth run, but her time fell short 
of making the short go. 

Williams' horse had trouble on 
the first barrel and knocked it over, 
but the rest of the run was fast. The 
five-second penalty kept her out of 
the short go. 

Two other team members , Cherie 
D'Amico and Derrick Meylian, rnade 
the trip to encourage the others, 
but were unable to compete because 
their National Intercollegiate Ro- 
deo Association membership cards 
had not been received. Both D'Amico 
and Meylian will compete at the 
next rodeo in Uvalde, Texas. 

The NSU rodeo team competes 
in the Southern Region of the NIRA, 
which is considered the toughest 
region in the world by most cowboys 
and cowgirls who compete in the 
association. 



Walsh leads Lady Demons 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

Freshman Maryalyce Walsh 
ran 18:24 over a three-mile course 
at the North Texas Invitational Fri- 
day to place second in the meet and 
lead the Lady Demons to a fifth 
place finish. 

NSU finished behind Angelo 
State, conference rivals North Texas 
and Texas-Arlington, and Louisi- 
ana Tech. Following Northwestern 
in the placings were Texas Chris- 
tian, East Texas , Stephen F. Aus- 
tin, Texas Tech and Tarleton State. 

Walsh has finished either first 
or second in all four meets the Lady 
Demons have been to this season. 

Following Walsh across the fin- 
ish line for the Lady Demons were 
Judy Norris (19:28) at 12th, Carla 
Davison (20:26) at 25th, Dianne 
Dubay (20:54) at 31st, Julie Martin 



(21:26) at 38th, Marie Gipe (21:29) 
at 41st, and Karen Current (23:36) 
at 59th. 

The men's team finished sev- 
enth behind Blin Junior College, 
Oklahoma, Texas-Arlington, North 
Texas, Lamar, and Louisiana Tech. 
The Demons outran Texas Tech, 
Tarleton State, Angelo State, East 
Texas, and Prarie View A&M. 

Freshman Damien Rosado led 
the Demons at 26:54 to place 29th. 
Other finishers were Billy Gaines 
(27:30) at 41st, Brad Sievers (27:56) 
at 48th, Les McMullen (28:27) at 
61st, Red O'Laughlin (28:56) at 71st 
and Tim Rosas (29:20) at 81st. 

Rene Coronado, Slade Lewis, 
Eric Metoyer, and Robbie Bryer also 
ran for NSU, but didn't place. 

Both teams will run again at 
the 10-K Invitational in Natchi- 
toches Saturday. 



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We're women concerned for women, weighing choices so you 
won't be making tough decisions alone. 



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#64 for District 4 




Hi NSU Students & Faculty. 

I am Wayne Attaway and I am a candidate for Police 
Jury District 4. lam a native of Natchitoches Parish. I ve 
worked for the Natchitoches Fire Dept. for 32 years. I 
have been a cattle farmer for 1 6 years. 



I am married and have two daughters, and three 
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I know the economic situation of Natchitoches Parish, I 
know the road conditions and blind corners. 

I stand for good leadership, good direction, and trying 
harder for District 4. 

Efficient management to get more out of your tax dollars. 

Team effort to do everything I can for District 4. So please 
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weekly honorable mention honors 
to UNT quarterback Mike Maher, 
linebacker Brad Kock, linebacker 
David Burns, and NSU running 
back Deon Ridgell. 

Look for some changes this week 
in the Demon lineup. John Tappin 
has been changed from wing back to 
split end and Brad Brown, who 
started the year at quarterback, will 
be lined up at the wing back position. 
Also look for more changes in the 
offensive line. Bill Britt, a senior 
two-year starter, suffered a broken 
back and was paralyzed from the 
waist down in a weekend hunting 
accident. Coach Sam Goodwin was 
optimistic about Britt. 

"I've never seen a guy tougher in 
that regard than Bill. He's going to 
battle this and get the most of 
whatever situation he's in," said 
Goodwin. 



The Demon defense will have a 
few players to watch. After a rough 
outing versus the pass against East 
Texas, they now must face either 
Wendall Mosely or Mike Maher , 
both respected quarterbacks who 
share a favorite receiver, J.R. 
Selexman. Selexman, on 3.7 catches 
per game, averages 52.5 yards this 
year. 

The "Purple Storm" defense of 
Northwestern will try to make some 
waves of its own. After a placid 
performance the Demons will try to 
improve on having allowed an 
unimpressive 349.5 yards per game . 
Key players for an improved team 
performance include Andre Carron, 
Adrian Hardy, Chad McDavid, and 
Randy Bullock. 

Chris Gilliam will continue to 
lead the Demon offense. While 
NSU's offense will probably want to 



establish the run, do not be surpijJ 
to see Gilliam go to the air. ^ 
year the freshman quarter^ 
already has touchdown passes ofy 
and 60 yards. 

Gilliam will face a second^ 
that has played from one extrem t j 
the other. While North Texas oij 
has four interceptions, three cu 
in one game. 

Deon Ridgell comes off a \% 
yard performance against £J 
Texas State and will remain tu 
starting running back. 

"Deon's playing so well, I & 
see anybody beating him out," 
Goodwin. 

Special teams will also come 
play. While North Texas pi 
Brad Allen has this year's loi 
kick (76 yards), Northwestern] 
Victor Robinson has the longest puj 
return (36 yards). 



October 



Lei 

In k ee P' 
ho mecomin 

y^bition.A 
' gj\B and ] 
joined toget 
the second 
festival Fol 
The follie 
Wednesday, 
fie ld. Each 
jeven differ* 
jjOO prize, w 
place teams 
respectively. 
muS t consis 
1 1er 



Homecoming Festival Follies 

Wednesday, October 1 6, 1 99 1 , 3:00pm, ROTC Fields 

First 25 Teams To Enter Receive 
FREE Homecoming T -Shirts 

GAMES 

Pie In The Face Contest - Airplane Toss - 3 -Legged Race - Egg Splash 
Water Pail Relay - Obstacle Course Over & Under Balloon Relay 

PRIZES 

1st Place - $100.00 2nd Place - $50.00 — 3rd Place - $25.00 

Please Return Completed Entry Form To The SAB or Leisure Activities Office 



Team Name 
Address 



Team Members Name & Social Security * 
1 2 _ 

3 4._ 

5 6._ 



Representative. 
Phone * 



For Additional Information Call 357-65 1 1 or 357-546 1 



first 25 teai 
before Frida 
g^e homecoi 
The activi 
pe-in-the-fai 
team will be 
at a person < 

Vo: 

los 



By JON TE 

Sports Edito 

No new h 
wins, was th 
may have h 
volleyball tei 
Wins over Gr 
lifted their 
season. 

The week 
Lady Demoni 
Tuesday nig] 
Tigers 15-11 
the night's a< 
Dowell led tl 
and Kelly B 
came off the i 
kills apiece, 
also had five 

But the ni 
South Alabai 
dealt the Lai 
15, 4-15, 13- 
struggled, bu 
and Kelly B 
The team cor 
but allowed ] 

Thursday 
road win at ( 



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SPORTS 



Page 5 



leisure Activities to sponsor Festival Follies, Ghost Run 



xas 



jn keeping with this year's 
[joniecoming theme - Pride and 
^bition.ANorthwestern Tradition 
SAB and Leisure Activities have 



join 1 
the 



lC d together again to bring you 
second annual Homecoming 



(notbesurprjj 
;o the air. *yy 
in quarterly 
own passes of^ 

ice a second* 
11 one extreqj 
forth Texas 
ons, three caj 

omes off a 135 
i against E, 
will remain 4 
ack. 

; so well, I ^ 
ig him out.'gjj 

n\\ also comeiq 
h Texas pui^ 
is year's longj 
Northwestern; 
ithelongestpm 



festival Follies. 

fhe follies will be held 3 p.m. 
Wednesday, Oct. 16 on the ROTC 
geld- Each team will compete in 
^ven different contests to win the 
jlOO prize, with the second and third 
place teams receiving $50 and $25 
jgspectively. The teams competing 
jjjuat consist of six members with 
each gender being represented. The 
gjgt 25 teams to enter the event 
before Friday, Oct. 11 will receive 
g^e homecoming t-shirts. 

The activities will begin with a 
pje_in-the-face contest, in which each 
wsJa will be given five pies to throw 
at a person of their choice. Next is 



the three-legged race. In the over- 
and-under water balloon relay, 
teams will have one minute to get as 
many water balloons in a bucket as 
possible. The next activity is the egg 
splash, which promises to be one of 
the more exciting events of the day. 
In the airplane toss, each member 
will have three minutes to construct 
and airplane and throw it as close to 
the target as possible. The next 
contest, the obstacle course, will 
proceed the last event of the day, the 
water pail relay, in which each team 
forms a line and passes a pail of 
water with holes in the bottom over 
their heads. The team with the most 
water left in the bucket at the end of 
the race is the winner. 

The entry deadline for the Festival 
Follies is Tuesday, Oct. 15. That 
evening, there will be a team 



captain's meeting at 6:30 in the SAB 
office or the Leisure Activities office. 
For additional information, please 
call the Leisure Activities office at 
357-5461 or the SAB office at 357- 
6511. 

The second annual Leisure 
Activities Ghost Chase will be held 
at 4:30 p.m. Halloween Day. This 
unique team triathalon features 
three-man teams competing in a row, 
ride and run format. After the first 
member rows a half-mile course on 
Chaplin's Lake, the second member 
will continue the competition by 
riding three and a half miles, and 
the third member will finish off the 



race with a two-mile run. The first 
place team will receive $50, the 
second place team $35, and third 
place will win $25. 

There will be a student division 
and a faculty/staff and community 
division. Each division will be divided 
into male and female brackets with 
a minimum of six teams composing 
a bracket and a minimum of ten 
teams per division. A $30 team entry 
fee is required for all non-student 
participants. Proceeds from this 
event will go to the Natchitoches 
Christmas Festival and be 
earmarked for the First Annual Duck 
Race. Each fee-paying team will 



receive three ducks to enter in the If you are interested in entering 
Duck Race. All participants will the Ghost Chase, call or come by the 
receive a Ghost Chase t-shirt. Leisure Activities office, 357-5461. 



Word Processing 




Invitations 


Computer Forms 




Banners, etc. 




CREATIONS 






by Martka 




P.O. Box 145 




Martha Courreges 


Marthaville. LA 71450 




318/472-9453 



Volleyball team 
loses SLC match 



fu, Social Smir'ir 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

No new injuries, along with two 
flins, was the news following what 
may have been the Lady Demon 
volleyball team's best week in 1991. 
Wins over Grambling and Centenary 
lifted their record to 4-13 on the 
season. 

The week started well when the 
Lady Demons travelled to Grambling 
Tuesday night. NSU beat the Lady 
Tigers 15-11, 18-16, 15-12 to open 
the night's action. Freshman Shera 
Dowell led the attack with 16 kills, 
and Kelly Banks and Karen Hill 
came off the injured list to add seven 
kills apiece. Senior Sandi Sherrell 
also had five service aces. 

But the night turned sour when 
South Alabama took the court and 
dealt the Lady Demons a 15-8, 12- 
15, 4-15, 13-15 loss. Shera Dowell 
struggled, but came up with 12 kills, 
and Kelly Banks added 11 more. 
The team compiled 11 service aces, 
but allowed 19 by South Alabama. 

Thursday night, NSU gained a 
road win at Centenary 15-12, 15-7, 



NCAA l-AA 
Top 20 Poll 

1. Nevada 

2. Furman 

3. Eastern Kentucky 

4. Boise State 

5. Holy Cross 

6. Villanova 

7. Northern Iowa 

8. Sam Houston 

9. Middle Tennessee 

10. Northeast 

11. Alabama State 

(tie) James Madison 

13. Marshall 

14. New Hampshire 

15. Southwest Missouri 

16. Appalachian State 

17. Youngstown State 

18. Idaho 

19- Southern Illinois 
Samford 



|120__ 

r 



15-5. Shera Dowell had 10 kills and 
Karen Hill had five, to help at team 
hitting average of .310. Sophomore 
Michelle Guidry scored five of the 
team's 12 service aces. 

The Lady Demons opened 
conference play Saturday at home 
with a loss to Texas-Arlington, 6-15,' 
4-15, 2-15. Northwestern held close 
to make the first two games exciting 
until UTA broke them open with big 
scoring runs. UTA scored 15 service 
aces and held the Lady Demons to 
only 11 kills for the match. 

"Overall the team played well 
against UTA," said Lady Demon 
coach Rickey McCalister . "Reception 
errors are making the games harder 
to win. We are always having to 
rally in the game due to service or 
reception errors." 

Senior Sandi Sherrill is first on 
the team and ranked 13th nationally 
in service aces, with 44 aces in 51 
games. She has come back from back 
injuries to play in the last two 
matches. 

This week, Southern will visit 
Prather Coliseum Wednesday night 
for a 7:30 match. Then the Lady 
Demons will go to Monroe Friday to 
face Northeast and Grambling. 



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live music nightly 9:00 til close 

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COMING SOON - 
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proper dress and id's required 



Discover Kinko's,^ 
where a good Mac 
is easy to find. 

If trying to find a computer when you need one is 
putting a drag on your plans for a class project, 
come Into Kinko's. You can work on a Mac 
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ideas, our Macs, and 
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M-F 7am- 10pm 
Sat 9-5 Sim 12-6 
352-8155 

510 College 




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the copy center 



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STUDENT DINNERS 

Every Tuesday & Thursday Night 



Reg. $9. 99 Special $ 4.99 save 55 00 



#1. Imperial Chicken 

#2. Boneless Cluckin 

#3. 'Beef 'with 'Broccoli 

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Attention Commuters 



If you need a place to relax, 
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Page 6 



EDITORIAL 



October 8, l^to*** 




Current Sauce 



Van Rodney Reed 

Editor 

Elizabeth McDavid Harris 

Managing Editor 
Michelle Genre 
News Editor 
Chris McGee 
Sports Editor 

Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 
Leonard A. Williams 
Lifestyle Editor 
Todd Martin 
Business Manager 



Brad Brown 


Ann Marie Kinard 


Wendy Byers 


Jason Oldham 


Troy Conklc 


Ashley Peterson 


1-ee Coricll 


Paul Parker 


Eric Dutile 


Paul Pickering 


Leigh Klynn 


Mary Porth 


Judy Francis 


Mike Thom 


Tina Foret 


Jennifer Roy 


Chris Gleason 


Brian Shirley 


Maria Jones 


Amy Staszak 




Staff 


Shawn Blank 


Tony Means 


Marty Branham 


Chris Young 


I.ex Harwell 





Photographers 
Russ Harris 

Artist 

Eben Cook Chris Necdham 

Attlterttsbig 
Scott Mills 
CiriuUitum 
Tom Whitehead 

Ath'iser 



EDITORIAL 

Racism not factor 
in Collins' article 

We have heard several comments on our 
choice to publish the article about Henrietta Collins' 
protest of the Homecoming Court election and would 
like to explain our decision. 

The primary purpose for printing the story 
was not to create controversy, but rather to report 
unbiased facts. We feel we did our job. 

However, one complaint about the article 
continues to surface. Several students have said the 
photo of Collins, which was run with the story, 
intended to make the situation a racial issue. In fact, 
Collins said at the Supreme Court hearing on Sept. 29 
that the newspaper made "it look like a racial issue." 

Nothing in the story indicated that Collins, 
because she is black, decided to confront Beth 
Gowland because she is white. The story reports 
Collins' appeal, the information concerning the time 
and place of the hearing and what Justice Morgan 
Collins and Student Government Association 
President Scott Andrews had to say about the issue. 
Unfortunately, we were unable to contact the plaintiff 
before we went to press. In turn, we did not print any 
statement from Gowland so we would not appear 
biased towards the defendant. 

The picture alone, surely, cannot incriminate 
us of turning Collins' appeal into a racial issue. 
Many newspapers use "mug shots" on the front page. 
The Oct. 7 issue of USA Today is a prime example. 
Four different mugs were used to accompany or to 
introduce stories. One of the shots was of Art Monk, 
a black player for the Redskins. 

We are sure Peter Prichard, the editor of USA 
Today, had no intention of labeling the Redskins as 
a "minority team" by using a photo of Monk. Nor do 
we feel that printing Henrietta Collins' picture on the 
front page of last week's Current Sauce was a poor 
decision. 

The picture accompanied the article so 
students could see who was making news. Not all 
Northwestern students may know Collins, and the 
picture was used to help students identify Collins by 
giving them a visual image, a technique used by 
many newspapers. 

Two weeks ago, we ran a picture of the new 
registrar, and we were not confronted. When 
possible, the Sauce prints pictures of whoever is 
associated with a particular story, regardless of race, 
gender or nationality. 

Readers may not always agree with the 
editorial choices of the Sauce, but we assure you that 
we do not base our decisions on a person's race, sex, 
creed or national origin. 



Current Sauce Editorial Policy 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to P.O. Box 5630, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497 or brought by the Office of Student 
Publications in 225 Kyser Hall. 

Letters to the editor must include the author's classification and 
hometown, as well as a telephone number where the writer can be reached. 
No anonymous letters will be printed. The Current Sauce reserves the 
right to edit all correspondence. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discretion of the editor. 



PEE-WEE IS 
FURIOUS 

ABOUT INDECENT 

exposure arrest 
after seeing nsu's 
Wooden demon 




'He almost ruined my offense' 

Demon coach 



confesses 

- how he used a psychic 
(The Amazing Gambi) 
to calf his plays 



October 8, 1991 



NORTHWESTERN 

ENQUIRER 





K. let's g< 
Henrietta 
^western 



95C'99C U K /1000 mil MEXICO/69. 5¥ JAPAN/? or = 2c NSU 



AMY'S LATE NIGHT COPY 



ELVIS SEEN WORKING 

IN IBERVILLE 



UFO aliens 
miffed about 
Black/White 
controversy 
- Spacemen say 
"It's A Green 
Thing." 



Tests 

Graftti Investigation 
Leads To Graham & 
Haley As 'Bathroom 
Bandits' 



Students claim: "The King can't cook" /shocking 

PHOTO 
REVEALS 





Everything you're dying to 
know about the marvelous 
'Man in Moon' movie premiere 




■8 



\ t challe 
jjorthwe 

it Beth Oo^ 

it* Studer 
>n,workc 

ijilehernai 

j^lshdwas 



dining 



Court 
not only ii 
institution, 

well- 

No, it was 
renins is not 
pn. No, Ckn 
(ccusedoffoi 
jjowthatv 
Peculations 
(gsinquestio 
^ fact that 
Ibe ballot am 
to be coi 



Guest Column 

Paul Pickering. 



Lower standards would hinder education 
Mississippi case could decide future of higher institutions 



As the U.S. Supreme Court pre- 
pares to convene once again, any- 
one with an interest in the state of 
U.S. education should pay particu- 
lar attention to its ruling in the 
Ayers v. Allain case. 

This case involves claims that 
Mississippi is maintaining de facto 
racial discrimination in its higher 
education system. A federal district 
court threw the case out, but a fed- 
eral appeals court reversed that 
decision, and now the case is being 
appealed again. 

But this is not just another "rac- 
ism" case. The recommendation of 
the appeals court judge was that 
the state should attempt to achieve 
equality in higher education at any 
cost; specifically, he said that the 
state universities should lower their 
standards. 

I find this decision most disturb- 
ing. If the Supreme Court upholds 
it, this could mean that our already 
deteriorating educational system 
will finally reach its nadir. 

If this decision stands, 
Mississippi's universities will be 
forced to lower standards of admis- 
sion to whatever levels the court 
deems sufficient to guarantee that 
all state residents can attend col- 
lege. More specifically, the ruling is 
designed to allow minorities, espe- 
cially blacks, to attend historically 
white schools, which have tougher 
admission standards than the his- 
torically black schools. Currently, 
historically white schools have an 
ACT requirement of 15, while his- 
torically black schools require a score 
of onlv 9. 



Without intending to hurt 
anyone's feelings, 111 say that those 
scores are pretty low to begin with, 
both of them being sufficient to land 
someone squarely in remedial 
classes. It seems almost oxymoronic 
to call any school with such low 
standards an "institution of higher 
learning." But to consider actually 
lowering those standards, well... 

What is truly terrifying about 
this case is that, if upheld, it will 
become a precedent which will bind 
all future lower court decisions. This 
means that minority class action 
suits of this kind will probably be in 
every state court in the nation about 
10 minutes after such a decision. 
Universities across the country 
could be forced to lower standards 
that are already dangerously low. 

But this decision doesn't stop at 
admission standards. It could, theo- 
retically, be applied to all standards, 
such as grades. All standards are 
inherently biased against someone. 
If grades are seen by someone as 
being a factor that could potentially 
deny them a college degree (if they 
make F's, for example), a strong 
case could then be made for doing 
away with them as well. Pretty soon, 
all we may be required to do for our 
degrees is simply show up. 

Notions of equality may be served 
by such a decision, but notions of 
society's rights will not. Would any- 
one feel comfortable seeing a doctor 
who graduated from such a school? 
I would guess not. For society to 
function, standards must exist. For 
society to function well, the stan- 
dards must be high. When students 



are educated under high standards, 
everyone benefits. 

The problem with our educa- 
tional system in this country is not 
that our kids can't do the work, but 
that not enough work is required of 
them. What I see is that everyone 
has what I call the "option of medi- 
ocrity." That is, American students 
know they don't have to perform 
and don't have to meet standards 
because there is always some school 
that will take them. 

NSU, like all the schools under 
the Board of Regents, is a classic 
example of this. NSU maintains an 
open admission policy, allowingjust 
about anyone to walk in the door. If 
you can sign your name on an ACT 
test, you can be a Demon. Is that 
something to be proud of? 

Don't get me wrong, this is not a 
condemnation of NSU. Plenty of 
good students and faculty are to be 
found here. But this is a condemna- 
tion of an educational system that 
refuses to hold someone responsible 
for his own actions. Any notion that 
someone should be entitled to an 
education without concern for his 
willingness or ability to meet cer- 
tain requirements is ludicrous. 

If I were black, I'd be outraged by 
the appeals court's decision. The 
court has stated, in so many words, 
that black students can't even per- 
form well enough to meet ACT score 
standards that would still require 
remedial classes. In this case the 
court and its justices, like so many 
well-meaning liberal organizations, 
end up sounding more like racists 
than reformers. 



Guest 

Ro 

Rodeo is a 
but understs 
He rules mig 
)nce you lee 
the rules it's 
what those c 
are doing in I 
The rule 
jeen put tog< 
the years, bu 
the advantai 
jrganizationi 
- lional Rodeo 
-and the Nai 
Rodeo Associ 
that the rule: 
The adva 
in timed evei 
ing, calf ropir 
reak-away c 
tosee for a sp 
lo watch for 
backs their ' 
rope is stret 
and held in p 
around eithc 

IthinkMississippi'sproiilcmani ^ > s conn 
the educational problem in thisnri |»pe is long < 



tion as a whole can be solved in( 



bead start b 



different way. My suggestion would "id breaks a 
bp to raise standards, rather thai™ contestar 
lower them. I think a federally manffe stretche 

dated minimum ACT/SAT score a| 
high school GPA requirement fa 
admission to any college or univefl 
sity would go a long way toward! 
putting the responsibility fori 
person's education back where » 
belongs— on the shoulders of th^ 
student and his/her family. 

Look at it this way, if studentl 
and their parents knew tV 
only way to go to college was & t T ° c 
make good grades and score mar- ^ 
ginally well on the ACT/SAT, you'l 
see some people hitting the boote 
Just look at Japan. They have jus 
such a system, and they can boast* 
literacy rate of over 99 percent. Ifl 
America, the "land of the free an 
the home of the brave," our literacy 
rate is half that. 



Utter t 

Mart 

Ira Revels,: 
College 

Recently, 



"Cresting ; 
^itorialsim 
as no fan ( 
Wlf. He 
,. to| d me tl 
J [bussing ti 
"•d me at a: 
Last wee! 
P er y commo 

A system like the one I recor» &n<j themsi 
mend exhibits the purest form 1 ' tociety. Tod 
equality, the equality of oppor 1 "' lack, and 
nity. Such things as race, creed* iperi ence 
color need not be an issue. Succesj Sndofthing 
or lack of it, would be the result' bj ,j avs nf) 
individual effort, not "gift" progra"* 
or similar forms of condescension 

Of course, for such a systefl 1 * 
work, there can be no exceptions^ 
not for at hlet es, not for legacies (ch* 
dren of alumni), not for sons ai* 
daughters of congressmen, andy** 
although the court in Ayers v. All** 
would like to think otherwise, & 
for minorities either. ^ 



Readers 7 Forum 



Tell the Sauce your opinion 




The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
that this feature could be misused for the sole purpose of causing 
embarrassment and pain to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the feature to degenerate to the 
level of a gossip line nor well we allow it to become a political battle 
ground. Complaints and criticisms should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibility to hold the line on this matter, and we 
have determined that each call we receive will be formally evaluated 
by an editorial committee composed of the editorial staff. No "one" 
individual will edit the calls. 



We will evaluate the calls for potential to inspire improvenie nt !jj 
any given area and then make a decision whether or not to public J 
Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an indepo 1 " " 



followup on the matter. 

To leave a message, just call our number at 357-5096 betw 



io* 



d * 



p.m. and 12 p.m. on weekdays and leave your name, classified 
major, and a brief message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers who requests 
opportunity to voice comments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers, 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. J 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the caret 3 '' 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



TV 1 



Nelyn ] 
liars' ( 

I ' a m wril 
>McDor 
>ni sLe£ 

Stion,"i 
\ U ^ntSai 

L rst - as 

> nt citizen 
1?' ^n 

Sag ar 

fee to b 

J'McDon 

C ,notF 

6 wor 



OPINIONS 



Page 7 



guest Column 

Jerry Roberson 



Gowland broke rules, but receives no punishment 



OK- ^ f ac ^ s straight. 

jj enr ietta Collins went before 

^western's Supreme Court on 
J° l t challenging the election of 
Northwestern Homecoming 
^m, for 1991. Collins contested 
. g e th Gowland, vice president 
f.he Student Government Asso- 
■ tion, worked at the election polls 

]e her name was on the ballot. 
' fflahd was elected to the Home- 
^ n g Court. Collins felt that this 
9 . n0 t only in violation of the SGA 
, onS titution, but morally offensive, 

$o, it was n °t a racial issue. No, 
;„Dins is not upset that she did not 
f^o, Gowland was not being 
^used of foul play. 

j^ow that we have all the obvious 
iceculations out of the way, what 
MS in question at the hearing? First, 
[he fact that Gowland was both on 
[he ballot and worked at the polls 
„ a s to be considered. Second, did 



she solicit votes while working? And 
finally, what was to happen if 
Collins' accusations were correct? 

Quite naturally, I felt that it was 
my duty as a voting student here at 
Northwestern to attend the hear- 
ing. When I entered the room, I felt 
an unspoken tension. Perhaps it 
had something to do with the fact 
that the room itself was segre- 
gated— blacks on one side, whites 
on the other. This, I think, was 
linked to the front page article run 
in last week's Current Sauce. 

The article would have been just 
fine if Collins picture hadn't been 
printed. Nevertheless, the picture 
was printed and some readers im- 
mediately assumed that this was a 
racial issue. Of course, this was sim- 
ply an editorial decision; however, 
it was an important one. 

No, racism didn't have anything 
to do with the case itself. However, 
one cannot say it was not a racial 



issue because one of the involved 
parties was black and the other was 
white. Let's face it, regardless of 
what the Supreme Court ruled, some 
people are simply never going to get 
over the fact that it was a black lady 
challenging a white lady in front of 
a predominantly white court. 

Anyway , statements were heard, 
and the Court was given the oppor- 
tunity to cross-examine the plain- 
tiff and the defendant. Collins 
pointed out that Gowland was ille- 
gally working at the polls, but 
Gowland argued that she was just 
fulfilling her responsibilities as vice 
president of SGA. 

Collins persisted that Gowland 
had blatantly broken the rules. 
Gowland continued to explain why 
she had made the decision to stay at 
the polls. She also had Harold 
Boutte, director of housing, as a 
witness in her defense, Boutte said 
that no foul play took place with the 



ballot box or with the solicitation of 
votes. 

In my opinion, there were two 
turning points in the case. 

Gowland admitted that she broke 
the rules. Collins should have capi- 
talized at this point by simply ask- 
ing the Court what was going to be 
done, thus placing the burden of 
immediate action on the Court. Isn't 
it true that in this country when 
someone admits that they are guilty 
of breaking a law, they are pun- 
ished? Correct me if I am wrong, but 
that is usually how the judicial sys- 
tem works. Nonetheless, Collins did 
not seize the moment. 

In one of the Court's cross-ex- 
aminations, a justice asked Collins 
for her opinion on what the outcome 
of the hearing should be. It was 
Collins' reply to this question that 
allowed the Court to slide out of 
having to act immediately. She re- 



plied that she wanted students to be 
informed of their rights and that 
they should not be quietly disre- 
garded. She also said that she sim- 
ply wanted the Court to do what 
they "knew in their hearts was the 
right thing to do." 

The Supreme Court ruled that 
the election would stand, and that 
Gowland would be allowed to re- 
main as vice-president of the SGA 
and a member of the Homecoming 
Court. 

However, they did rule that be- 
fore the next election, the Senate 
must amend the policy concerning 
the responsibility conflict between 
the position of SGA vice-president 
and the possibility of that person 
being a candidate in an election. 

The Court made a logical deci- 
sion. Gowland was not penalized. 
Collins' appeal did make some of 
the students take notice of the im- 



portance of being informed about 
their rights. Yes, the Court did w 1 it 
they felt was the right thing to 

Gowland was guilty of break £ 
the law. If I go over to Brookshire's 
and steal five steaks, it's not going 
to matter one bit that my seven 
children, wife and grandmother 
were at home starving. The only 
thing the judge will say is that he's 
sorry about my responsibility con 
flict, but I broke the law. Therefore, 
I must pay for my crime. 

Can Northwestern, a microcosm 
of America, allow students to break 
laws and not be penalized, espe- 
cially those in leadership positions? 

I commend Collins for taking a 
stand, Gowland for doing her abso- 
lute best to fulfill her duties as SGA 
vice-president, and finally, the Su- 
preme Court for ruling so that this 
situation does not occur again in the 
future. 



Guest Column 



Bob Weathers 



Rodeo rules, language easy to learn 



Rodeo is a great sport to watch, 
but understanding the lingo and 
die rules might be a bit confusing. 
Once you learn the language and 
the rules it's easier to understand 
(that those cowboys and cowgirls 
aredoing in the arena. 

The rules of competition have 
been put together by cowboys over 
ie years, but the animal is given 
the advantage. There are many 
[rganizations, such as the Profes- 
sional Rodeo Cowboys Association 
and the National Intercollegiate 
Rodeo Association which see to it 
hat the rules are followed. 

The advantage cattle are given 
n timed events, such as team rop- 
ing, calf roping, steer wrestling and 
reak-away calf roping, can be hard 
usee for a spectator, so here's what 
lo watch for. When a contestant 
backs their horse into the box, a 
rope is stretched across the front 
and held in place by a pin. A rope 
around either a calf s or a steer's 
iroblemafl f& is connected to the pin. The 
l in this rufc* i 8 long enough to give them a 
solved inapad start before it pulls the pin 
stion woulPKl breaks away from the neck. If 
at her than* 16 contestant's horse crosses the 
ei ally man- 1* stretched in front of the box 
lT score 
i ement for 
■ cir univer 
ay toward! 
ility for 
k where* 
ders of ti 

ulv - irr.ii 
if studentf °"ege 

w th ' lf l Kecerit ly> I had the pleasure of 



n 



before the pin is pulled, the barrier 
is broken. A broken barrier gets the 
contestant a damaging 10-second 
penalty, and in most cases it keeps 
the contestant from winning any 
money. 

In bareback and saddle bronc 
riding, two of the three roughstock 
events, the cowboy must spur the 
horse in front of the shoulders on 
the first jump from the chute. This 
is called marking out the horse, and 
if it is not done, the rider is disquali- 
fied. The rider must make an eight- 
second ride while holding on with 
one hand and keeping his free hand 
from touching the animal. If his 
free hand touches, he has fouled 
and is disqualified. 

In bull riding, the other 
roughstock event, the cowboys are 
not required to mark the bull out, 
spurring is optional but the other 
rules apply. Bull riding is the most 
dangerous event in rodeo, and that 
is easy to see when a 1,500 to 2,000 
pound bull wants to send the cow- 
boy on a flight, then greet him when 
he lands. 

In team roping, the object is for 
the "header" to rope the steer around 
the horns, and for the "healer" to 



catch both hind legs in as short a 
time possible. After both contes- 
tants catch, they must face each 
other before the clocks stop. If a 
header misses, the team takes a no- 
time, a score of zero. If the header 
catches and the healer misses, the 
team takes a no-time. If the healer 
only catches one hind leg, a five- 
second penalty is added. 

In calf roping, the contestant 
ropes the calf around the neck, dis- 
mounts, throws the calf and ties 
three legs together with a piggin' 
string. The calf must stay tied for 
six seconds after the roper remounts 
and slackens the rope or a no-time is 
given. 

In steer wrestling, the cowboy's 
goal is to score a takedown in as 
little time as possible. He rides 
after a steer, leans off his horse, 
grabs him around the horns or head, 
slows him down and finally takes 
him down by turning his head. The 
steer wrestler is helped by a hazer, 
the cowboy riding on the opposite 
side of the contestant, who keeps 
the steer in tight. It is a fast event, 
and many professional cowboys 
score a takedown in under four sec- 
onds. 



In barrel racing, the cowgirl races 
her horse around three barrels in a 
cloverleaf pattern. A five-second 
penalty is assessed lor knocking a 
barrel over. This is the only event 
timed in hundredths of seconds be- 
cause the competition is usually so 
fast and close. 

In goat tying, the object is for a 
cowgirl to race her horse from one 

end of the arena to the other, where 
a goat is held and tied by a rope to a 
stake. When the cowgirl gets close 
to the goat, the holder lets go of the 
goat, and the cowgirl dismounts 
usually at a run before the horse 
stops, throws the goat and ties three 
ofthelegs. Ifthegoatgetsup within 
six seconds after it is tied, the cow- 
girl takes a no time. 

In pole bending, which is similar 
to barrel racing, the cowgirl races 
her horse in a slalom pattern around 
the poles. The poles are easy to 
knock down, and if this is done, a 
five-second penalty is added to the 
time. 

Now that you know a little bit 
more of the lingo and rules, use it as 
a good excuse to attend a local ro- 
deo. Youll enjoy it tremendously, 
and that's no bull. 



Letter to the Editor 

Martin's editorial exhibits common mistake made by whites 

Revels, Freshman, Scholars' 



was t« 



ege 
score 
/SAT, yofl 



ting Todd Martin for the first 
"toe after having read many of his 
Cresting and thought-provoking 
the bootl Ptorials in the Sauce. I must admit 
v havej" 5 ' !* as no fan of his until he explained 
can' boasti """self. He didn't go in-depth, but 
percent. I" ^ me that he would enjoy 
he free and ^ssing topics of interest to him 
aur literary ^ me at any time. 

Last week's editorial exhibited a 
' ei 7 common mistake most whites 
ne 1 record find themselves making in this 
est form fcci ety Todd yQU have never been 

ac k, and until you have that 
^rience, know what 

of things we must contend with, 
days past, our parents and 



of opporW 
ce. creed* 
je. Succe* 
he result » 
l" program 5 
lescensi<H| 

i system"] 
ceptions' 
Eracies(cW | i 
r sons i 
-n.andy* 
jrsv.A 
erwise 



grandparents were subjected to acts 
of overt racism. That is, they knew, 
especially in the South, where they 
stood with whites. Signs such as 
"For White People Only" graced the 
doors of restaurants and public rest 
rooms. 

Now, racism is no longer 
fashionable in large social circles, 
so it has become covert. These days, 
when a black person applies for a 
job and does not receive it, even 
though he is qualified, in some cases 
more qualified that his white 
counterparts, he tends to question 
the validity of the hiring practices of 
his would-be employer. 

I read a quote once that made a 
lot of sense to me, and it may help 
you understand where we're coming 



from. It went something like this: 
"The government can change the 
laws, but it can never change men's 
hearts." Think about it. I'm an 
advocate of affirmative action 
because that's the only solution we 
have to a very personal problem. 
Could you come up with a better 
way for us to get our foot in the door? 
Education? What happens when 
we're qualified and still don't get 
the job? Not everyone believes the 
way you do, that "we're all created 
equal." Wake up and smell the 
burning toast, Todd. There are 
racists and skinheads in the world 
and televangelists who will take 
your money. If all white people 
believed that all people were created 
equal, we wouldn't even be having 



this discussion. This is what makes 
programs such as affirmative action 
necessary. 

It's important for you to 
remember that blacks, Hispanics, 
women, Asians and Indians are very 
much the minority in America. 
White males are the majority. I'm 
not saying that every white male is 
rich and powerful. Without going 
into great detail, I'm saying tl/at it 
has been proven that white males 
own the majority ofbusinesses. And 
as long as there continues to be a 
white racist in America who controls 
the "American Dream," there 
continues to be another black 
without an opportunity to make it 
happen. 



Guest Column 

Rich Engstrom 



Students must take 
part in state election 

Collegiates encouraged to reach 
outside of sheltered world 



We all know how it is here at 
NSU: tests, term papers, parties, 
lab reports, dancing, research 
projects, hot dates, reports. . . aca- 
demics just seem to take up all our 
time and energy. In fact, many of us 
know very little about the world 
outside of our little celebra... um, 
cerebrations. 

A little random survey I con- 
ducted here on campus, consisting 
of six people who happened to be 
sitting at my table in the Student 
Union cafeteria, was very reveal- 
ing. NSU students seem to agree on 
the following facts about the out- 
side world: 1) Speed limits are en- 
tirely too low; 2) ATM cards are very 
important and 3) At about 2 a.m. on 
Friday and Saturday nights, the 
■vorld gets blurry and starts to 
'wobble." 

Well, I'm here to tell you that 
there is something important going 
>n. We are about to elect, or re- 
flect, our governor. The governor of 
..ouisiana has been referred to as 
-he second most powerful man in 
:he United States, thanks to the 
orecedents set by Huey Long, which 
>nly goes to show us that we must 
:arefully select who we elect. This, 
:n turn, goes to show us that we 
nust be informed about more than 
;peed limits, money machines, and 
tvobbly evenings. 

So, here we are. Caught up in 
our world of (check) books and (pool ) 
tables. What's the plan? Well, a 
good place to begin might be a short 
trip to the library ask seniors, they 
know. Don't worry; this will be a 
short trip. The media center on the 
second floor holds current and back 



issues of many Louisiana papers. 
Most should be in the middle of, or 
just finishing, series on each of the 
candidates. Read a couple. 

Another option is trying to catch 
a local news broadcast a few times 
this week. The governor's race, you 
may be surprised to find out, is big 
news right now. Talk to friends. 
Ask a cop. Call information. Read 
a prayer book; try under: "In need of 
a miracle." But don't just sit there. 

And for you doubters, let me say 
that voting does make a difference. 
The candidates, whose names and 
little levers we will soon be facing, 
are all different. And, like it or not, 
whoever gets the most votes will 
have a big say in our lives. Gam- 
bling, abortion, education funding — 
i.e. your tuition, environmental pro- 
tection, drug policy, police services, 
welfare implementation... the can 
didates have different opinions anr 
plans regarding our state and, ulti- 
mately, our quality of life. 

Okay, if you still don't think 
you're going to vote, let me tell you 
one more thing. If you don't vote, 
you're leaving the choice up to oth- 
ers. Have you taken a look around 
lately? I mean, hey, if the people ir 
college don't vote, we're leaving the 
decision up to people like the gu; 
who mixed up red and green anc 
almost killed me at an intersection 
last week, and this fast food worker 
who, the other day, had trouble un- 
derstanding the word "hamburger." 
Inform yourselves and vote. Warn- 
ing: election day is on a Saturday... 
try to get to bed before the Friday 
night wobblies. 



^tter to the Editor 

"Trees, ecology, recycling can make Earth better place to live 

McDonald's editorial jumps to incorrect conclusions, misleading statements about topics 



*dely n Boudreaux, Senior, 
*olars' College 

' am writing this in response to 
an McDonald's column, "The Big 
jj^n is Leading America in Wrong 
^'on.'intheOct. 1 issue of the 
V f - 



e nt Sauce 



ir st, as a concerned and intelli- 



)venie flt . 
publis" 
idepend 



L 111 citizen of this country and this 
L° r ' d > I am interested in the free 
L an ge of ideas. Insults and mud- 
L/'Sng are acceptable forms of 
.T^h; however, in a forum pur- 



i 1 'k 



tj Jt ]g to be that of intellect, writ- 
tJ 1 bv a student of higher educa- 



hetweC 11 '1 3 mindless bashing of any group 

ssiflca^ 



^uest^ *\ 



ers. 



H* 1 



caret 



H n S inflammatory language does 
tjj farther ideas but hinders the 
jjj.° u eht processes and encourages 
Hj n<1 emotional responses. Please, 
v 6r McDonald, let us attempt con- 
i,j 6 Sa tion, or at least aim insults at 
L * 8 . not people. My sanity is not 
l^estion anymore than yours is 
h 8 * U8e we disagree, and we all 
v e worth and value. 



Mr. 



McDonald, I would also appreciate 
it if you would refrain from making 
accusations of drug use among 
groups of people about whom you 
obviously can only speculate. 

To answer charges put forth in 
the article, let me point out that 
Ecology, and specifically tree plant- 
ing is not the only thing the "Radi- 
cal Left"isworkingtowards. Groups 
exist to stop racism, sexism, unnec- 
essary killing, starvation and other 
anti-human problems that face the 
Earth. 

Trees are a concern for many 
reasons, the biggest perhaps being 
the production of oxygen. As urban 
sprawl and agriculture destroy 
masses of oxygen-producing forest 
land every year, our population is 
already over five billion people and 
growing rapidly. Trees and other 
plants are necessary for the contin- 
ued production of oxygen and re- 
moval of carbon dioxide. While ag- 
riculture is important in the feed- 



ing of the world's populations, areas 
like the rain forests do not have 
deep enough soil to support agricul- 
ture. These areas will in time be- 
come wastelands as agricultural 
groups move on to other land. Thus, 
no oxygen will be produced in those 
areas. This has already happened 
to once lush Lebanon and Ethiopia. 
For anyone interested in a biblical 
statement to backup the conserva- 
tion of trees, how about this from 
Deuteronomy 20: 19: "When you be- 
siege a city in war, do not destroy its 
trees... for is a tree a person that 
should be destroyed by you?" 

Mr. McDonald, you jump to a 
very incorrect conclusion when you 
state that "the phase-out of older, 
coal-fired power plants" means a 
turn towards "safer and cleaner" 
nuclear power. Either this was a 
deliberate attempt to mislead your 
readers, or you simply were too ea- 
ger to make your point and didn't 
think about that statement. There 



are many other alternative sources 
of energy, including wind power, 
water and steam, and the most 
promising, solar power. According 
to ACT NOW, a group ofbusinesses 
working to help the environment, 
the United States spent 10 times 
more on solar research in 1980 than 
today. Now, it spends 10 times more 
on nuclear and fossil fuels than on 
renewable energy. The solar panels 
which were proving quite effective 
from farms and suburbs in the Mid- 
west to the White House have been 
abandoned in the Reagan and Bush 
years. Once the nation pulled out of 
the energy crisis of the late seven- 
ties and early eighties, we figured it 
would never happen again. Mr. 
Reagan removed the solar panels 
from the White House and sent out 
a message to alternative energy re- 
searchers: no more funding. 

Most advocates of recycling are 
aware of the toxic bleaches used in 
paper recycling. We do not support 



their use. Of course, paper recycled 
without bleaches and chemicals are 
not nearly as pretty as new paper 
and bleached paper, as everyone 
who got the Wal-Mart circular 
printed on recycled paper several 
weeks ago knows, but what differ- 
ence does that make? Toilet paper, 
newsprint, and notebook paper do 
not need to be brilliant white, and 
are excellent uses for recycled pa- 
per pulp. 

Acid rain is another important 
concern, of course. It is misleading, 
however to state that the content 
will not effect the already acidic 
lakes. Natural waters vary in pH 
balance, depending on vegetation 
in the area, what mineral beds the 
water filters through, and other 
natural factors. The variance, 
though, is not near that of lakes 
affected by acid rain, some of which 
currently have a pH below four. On 
a scale of seven, that's very acidic 
for a life supporting ecosystem. 



I question the irrelevancy of mon- 
ies spent to clean up our environ- 
ment. How much of the tax-payers' 
money went to support Bush's 
Persian Gulf War, now revealed as 
a deliberate attempt to get rid of the 
Kurds. By the way, if a 3-month old 
Iraqi or Kurdish baby were placed 
in front of an American tank, would 
it stop? I hope so, just as that 
bulldozer did, but I'm not sure. How 
many human lives were sacrificed 
in the Persian Gulf? Do rephrase 
your statement. They would waste 
a life to save 50 cents per gallon on 
gasoline. 

So, ignore the bandwagon, quit 
screaming insults, and do what you 
feel is necessary to make the world 
we live in a better place. But quit 
using jingoism and rhetoric, and 
start using your minds. Thank you, 
I have a job, a life, and live firmly in 
the '90s. This is the decade to learn 
from the past, not repeat it. Are you 
learning? 



Page 8 



LIFESTYLE 



October 8, 199] 



Smalltown movie features local talent 
Witherspoon, Warfield make impressive debuts 




THE MAN 
IN THE 

MQ£)N 



A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
Presentation 

Directed by Robert Mulligan 
Produced by Mark Rydell 
Written by Jenny Wingfield 

Principal Cast: 

Reese Witherspoon as Dani 
Trant 

Jason London as Court Foster 
Emily Warfield as Maureen 
Trant 

Sam Waterston as Matthew 
Trant 

Tess Harper as Abigail Trant 

Good Points: 

The simple story was a 
refreshing change of pace from 
today's "blockbuster" genre of 
movies. 

Reese Witherspoon, only 14 
years old, proves in her cinematic 
debut that she's an actress who 
can hold her own with seasoned 
performers. 

James Newton Howard's 
shimmering score adds 
emotional depth to every scene. 

Bad Points: 

Sam Waterston, strangely 
enough, gives an ineffectual and 
stony performance. 

While attractively 
photographed, the movie seems 
too dim in many scenes. 

The movie is rated TG-13" for 
minor sexual content and 
language. 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 

Staff Writer 

Once in a while, along comes a 
movie that has no pretensions, no 
delusions of grandeur and no airs of 
importance. It sets out to tell a story 
and accomplishes that task with 
quiet dignity. The Man in the Moon" 
is one such film. 

There are no explosions in "The 
Man in the Moon." There are no 
killer robots from the future, no 
high-powered jets and no demons 
from another dimension. "The Man 
in the Moon" does have an abun- 
dance of talent, a good story and 
beautifully shot scenes. 

Filmed in nearby Robeline and 
set in the 1950s, the film centers 
around 14-year-old Dani Trant, who 
shares her hopes and dreams about 
life and love with her older sister, 
Maureen, as the two sit and talk 
each night on their moonlit front 
porch. 

Dani finds her eagerly-antici- 
pated first love in handsome Court, 
a 17-year-old who has returned to 
town with his family to manage his 
father's farm. The two become fast 
friends, but Dani envisions more 
than just friendly talks and splash- 
ing around in the swimming hole. 

Court knows better, and treats 
Dani more as a buddy than a sweet- 
heart. He's interested in Maureen. 
When the two meet, it's love at first 
sight, and their instant attraction 
blinds them to Dam's pain from a 
broken heart. As the story 
progresses, Maureen and Dani are 
torn apart by a tragedy that eventu- 
ally brings them closer together. 

And that's it. The unadorned plot 
of "The Man in the Moon" is quite 
refreshing in today's world of com- 
plex stories involving dozens of char- 
acters and outrageous special ef- 
fects. Director Robert Mulligan and 
writer Jenny Wingfield must be com- 
mended for a sweet, simple movie 
that doesn't resort to Hollywood glitz 
and glamour to tell such an en- 
trancing story. 

The actors in the movie deserve 
just as much respect, especially 



Reese Witherspoon, who makes her 
movie debut as Dani. Although only 
14 at the time of filming, 
Witherspoon carried the movie with 
considerable finesse. A pleasure to 
watch, her natural exuberance en- 
hances her character and the entire 
film. 

Witherspoon certainly has a 
promising future in the business, 
and "The Man in the Moon" is sure 
to open doors for her. And who 
knows, one day she might even out- 
shine that other actress who got her 
big break in a movie filmed in 
Natchitoches. 

Jason London as Court and Emily 
Warfield as Maureen also provide 
strong performances. A Texas na- 
tive, London's sincere delivery and 
Southern manners serve him well 
in the role of a young man trying to 
find the balance between love and 
friendship. As Dani's older sister, 
Warfield gives an involving por- 
trayal of a young woman experienc- 
ing true love and true grief. 

Sam Waterston and Tess Harper, 
both excellent actors, are not fully 
utilized, although understandably 
so. "The Man in the Moon" is not 
about Dani's parents, so naturally 
they don't get as much exposure. 

Harper is good in her small part 
as the compassionate mother, but 
something must have happened to 
Waterston. As "The Killing Fields" 
proved, he's a terrific actor, but his 
performance in "The Man in the 
Moon" is absolutely wooden. All fa- 
therly smiles and angry glares, he 



seems to merely recite his lines. In 
an important scene where Dani 
must learn to forgive her sister, 
Waterston's words are so canned 
it's as if he's reading cue cards. 

Director of photography Freddie 
Francis' dramatic expanses of 
Robeline's grass and sky are gor- 
geous. An Academy Award winner 

for the cinematography of "Glory," 
Francis is able to fill many scenes 
with majestic oaks or sun-dappled 
water. However, much of the movie 
is simply too dark; shadows cross 
almost every face and dim much of 
the action. A little more light in 
certain areas, especially the inte- 
rior shots, would have been appreci- 
ated. 

Final kudos go to the music of 
James Newton Howard. From the 
light, excited rhythms of Dani's run 
to the pond, to the mournful strains 
of the funeral scene, Howard's score 
fit perfectly with the film. 

Overall, the tender story of "The 
Man in the Moon" is sure to be a 
sleeper hit. Moviegoers may over- 
look it as expected blockbusters such 
as "Hook" or "The Fisher King" open, 
but they'll be missing a pleasant 
surprise. 



Reese Witherspoon, left, and Emily Warfield star as two sisters whose relationship is strain^, 
they fall in love with the same young man. 



Note for 
Note 



in LIFESTYLE 
next week 




Pot Plants 




Flower Arrangements 
Balloons 



Fruit Basket) 



1 17 Si. Denis Street 
Nalchiloches, LA 71457 



Off.: 357-1 160 
Res.: 352-4497 
Owner: Mary Lou LaCaze 



Hours: 
9:00 5:00 Mon.-Fri. 
9:00-12:00 Saturdays 




lov 
recc 

Player n 

CHRIS » 

forts 



Richard a 
ent reside™ 
jested, but 
^ywhere els 
Richard a 
grentsofBil 
Jensive lint 
jjvsis wher 
j^d while 1 
Iritts are coi 
ide in Our 
penal Medi 
buge as he 
lack surge 
[ Wednesday. 
Brittisex 
- ..kntparalys 

"With a touch of New OrleansT dhispar ! 

Wmain with 

Home Cooked Food 
plus Daily Specials 

an 

nto a new i ■ 



Meat Pie Kitchen & 
Restaurant 



Editoi 



Enjoy our 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner^ 

Service 



docl 
[til's back i 
mlurrin. He 

to units of 

7 a.m. to 7 p.m. while Bn 
Monday thru Saturday lantcompa: 

622 SocondSt Ktt'sNortr 
Natchitoches, U « to rally t 
letup a Bill 



ktchitoche 
erous si: 
to sen 
On Oct. 
id $3,13 
Stadium dui 
m over No 
Northwestei 
ncutive 1 
Dilations \ 
tedium ent 
wing a sil 
ifhNorthw 
frsey numb 
While th 
litt's aid, 
inue to floo 
"Just ket 
^mother. 
"Nshere. 
letters ' 
North we 
>ch Sam 
^ his fan 
"H Thurs 
jd Britt n 
* in a str 
'He's doii 
expected 
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tu Je and d 
I'ooksbac] 
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'3rd ins 
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'ursday, i 
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Iwin sa 



ITZA PIZZA 

*Watch out for the 1st 
Annual ITZA PIZZA 
Costume Party* 

Prizes,specials & much, 

much, more! 
Details coming soon... 



We now offer 
a wide 
selection of 
RC & Nehi 
Cola's !! 



Gome in and try 
the brand new, 
ice cold drink 
selection ! 



What can we do for 
you? Let us know! 

October 8, 
1991 -Student Survey 
Its your opportunity 
to suggest to us how 
we can serve you 
better. 




Tuesday: Movie night 
Free Popcorn during 
the movie. 



rvz 



Monday Night Football- 
Specials-Prizes-Drawings! 



IIUU 



-October 8: Directors Treat 

-Octets 10: WOK-A-fflOfil 

Coo£ y,our own tneaf at the 

Entree : beefi , chicken, pori, aion^ 
a/ith carrots, iroccoii, 1 
caa^foa/er, onion, iean sprouts, 
water chest nuts, mushrooms 



Nor ] t 



Tuesday October 
8: Student Survey 
Let us Know 

WHAT YOU 
THINK!! 



**hitoc 



r8,199| 



5UPER Sports 

pemons Beat North 
fexas, page 5 





Editorial 

Co-op program 
gets A+, page 8 



Lifestyle 

homecoming 

TABLOID 




Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

October 15, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 11 



Northwestern State University 



p is strain^ 



Britt 

slowly 
recovers 

player receives surgery 



^ C HRIS McGEE 



Editor 



r ood 



our 

inner 
rice 



Ms 

Urn 
l*oi 



Richard and Melba Britt's cur- 
jpt residence is not one they re- 
nted, but they wouldn't dare be 
Inhere else at this time. 
Richard and Melba Britt are the 
Utentsof Bill Britt, Northwestern's 
flensive lineman who suffered pa- 
jysis when he fell from a deer 
^'nd while hunting on Oct. 5. The 
jfjtts are continually at their son's 
in Our Lady of the Lake Re- 
Medical Center in Baton 
ouge as he slowly recovers from 
q lack surgery performed last 
311 Qiednesday. 

_ . I Britt is expected to suffer perma- 
1 13 III Wnt paralysis from the waist down, 
leSnS* a S parents and his wife, Kelli, 
tmain with him around the clock 
oprovide constant support and love . 
"He's doing pretty good right 
pj o|q m" said Melba Britt on Monday, 
O I dl O ervo i C e simultaneously carrying a 
onfident and weary tone. "Bill got 
ito a new room today, just a little 
rtiile ago. 

The doctors put some rods in 
's back to stabilize his spinal 
Hmn. He's supposed to receive 
units of blood today." 
) 7 p.m. While Britt'sfamilygivehimcon- 
atUfday lintcompany and encouragement, 
ocond St kitt's Northwestern family contin- 
>chea, u K to rally to his aid. Officials have 

„ (tup a Bill Britt Support Fund at 

J Satchitoches' Exchange Bank, and 

hmerous signat ures have been col- 
lated to send to Britt. 

On Oct. 12, "Bill Britt Night" 
feed $3,138 for the fund in Turpin 
ium during the Demons' 24-10 
•in over North Texas, according to 
Northwestern Athletic Association 
Scutive Director Greg Burke, 
ations were accepted at each 
idium entrance with donors re- 
viving a silver and purple sticker 
wthNorthw estern's logo and Britt's 
bey number, 71. 

While the community rallies to 
"itts aid, letters and cards con- 
Ne to flood into Britt's address. 
"Just keep praying for us," said 
^mother. "Bill has everything he 
*dshere. He's gotten lots of cards 
letters." 

I Northwestern head football 
p* Sam Goodwin visited Britt 
tod his family in Britt's hospital 
toil Thursday and Sunday. He 
1^ Britt maintains optimism, al- 
**in a struggling manner. 
"He's doing about as good as can 
* expected," said Goodwin of his 
"^or leader. "He has his good days 
nd bad days. He thinks about the 
"^e and does well, but sometimes, 
'looks back and thinks about what 
^Sht have been. If he can just look 
f*ard instead of back, he's fine." 
Goodwin said he spoke at length 
Richard Britt, Bill's father, 
?" rS( %> and he said the family 
J^ains strong but shows some ob- 
and understandable fatigue, 
^win said that Kelli seemed to 

■ Please see Britt on page 4 



Break a leg 





Performers in the theater program's Tartuffe' make final preparations before the opening night of their production. On left, 
Robert Larriviere as Tartuffe, Lynn Gilcrease as Elmire, and David Shamburger as Orgon rehearse their lines one last time. 

Tartuffe' to make debut 
tonight in Theatre West 

Moliere's classic comedy to open 
1 991 -92 Northwestern Theatre season 



ts. 



Northwestern's Theater will open 
its 1991-92 season with Moliere's 
classic farce "Tartuffe" Oct. 15-22 in 
Theater West. Showtime each 
evening will be at 7:30 p.m. 

Moliere's play exposes the evil 
that men can do in the name of 
religious fervorand the angers that 
can harm those who believe only 
what they want, despite much evi- 
dence to the contrary. 

"One thing about this play that is 
so appealing is its timeliness," said 
Northwestern artistic director Dr. 
Jack Wann. "So much press has 
been given to religious hypocrisy, 
the Jim Bakkers and Jimmy 
Swaggarts, and this is a play about 
religious hypocrisy." 

Even though the play is about 
religion, Moliere was not attempt- 
ing to make a statement against 



NORTHWESTERN 




THEATRE 



religion, said Wann. 

"This play is not a cut down of 
religion but it is a cut down of phony 
religion," he said. "It's so current 
that any charlatans of the 1990s 
who would wonder and would feel 
uncomfortable seeing themselves." 

The lead character, Tartuffe, is 
an impostor who schemes his way 
into the home of a wealthy man, 
Orgon. Once he gets into Orgon's 



good graces, Tartuffe tries to marry 
Orgon's daughter, seduce his wife 
and take away Orgon's property. 

Tartuffe nearly succeeds but is 
stopped by an emissary from King 
Louis XTV, who frees Orgon, recov- 
ers his property and takes Tartuffe 
to jail. 

"This is a good play for our stu- 
dents because it's their first experi- 
ence with Alexandrine verse which 
Moliere used," said Wann. "It's dif- 
ferent than Shakespearian verse 
because it rhymes at the end of each 
line. The pattern is similar to the 
one in Twas the Night Before Christ- 
mas' and it's so well written no one 
notices the internal rhyme." 

Tickets for the play may be lim- 
ited. For more information, contact 
the Northwestern Theater Box Of- 
fice at 357-5819. 



Elephant man 
to give lecture 

Leakey to speak on animal 
killings around globe 




Leakey 



Richard Leakey, the chairman of 
the National Museums of Kenya, 
will present a lecture entitled "Can 
We Save the Elephants?" as part of 
the Distinguished Lecture Series at 
Northwestern. 

The lec- 
,ture, part of 
Leakey's efforts 
to focus world 
attention on 
man's killing of 
elephants, will 
be held at 9:30 
a.m. on Thurs- 
day in the A.A. 
Fredericks Cre- 
ative and Performing Arts Center. 

Leakey has used a variety of tac- 
tics in an attempt to help stop the 
international trade of ivory, includ- 
ing once burning 12 tons of ivory to 
demonstrate that poaching would 
no longer be tolerated. 

Leakey, who has lectured around 
the world on a variety of topics, is 
the author of four books on evolu- 
tion. Through his work, he has chal- 
lenged several established evolu- 
tionary theories. 

According to Leakey, 650,000 el- 
ephants, nearly half of the elephant 
population from 1980, has been 
kifled over the past decade. 



NORTHWESTERN S 



DISTINGUISHED 
LECTURE 



SERIES 



Through the efforts of Leakey 
and a worldwide ban on ivory, the 
value of ivory has dropped from $200 
a kilo to $2 a kilo. 

"It's been startling that someone 
woul-1 make such efforts at so much 
financial cost to the country that 
seized the ivory," according to Dr. 
Dick Stalling, Northwestern pro- 
fessor of biology. "His efforts made 
people stand up and take attention 
and realize that it is an issue that 
everyone needs to deal with." 

Leakey's crusade to ban ivory 
has attracted a number of critics 
including outdoor writer Grits 
Gresham of Natchitoches who wrote 
an article in the October 1991 issue 
of Sports Afield which said a ban on 
ivory would actually be counterpro- 
ductive. 

Further controversy arose from 
Leakey's efforts to promote a project 
that would fence in Kenya's wildlife 
parks to create an 8,000-square- 
mile zoo. 



NSU receives $73,948 
co-op education grant 

Director says co-op gives students 'edge' 



3r 



(Inside | 


l^ndar 


2 


^ppus Connection 


3 


Clonals 


6 


ti!!style_ 


8 


^vs in Brief 


2 


pinions 


7 


1 ^Per Sports 


5 


Lett ers to the Editor 


7 


* Student Newspaper //iff^f^ 
^orthweatern State University (lllilll)) 
J* tc hUoches, Louisiana 




357-5456 | 



Brown receives top student honor 

Mr. NSU surprised to learn of his victory in election 



Northwestern has received a 
$73,948 grant from the U.S. De- 
partment of Education for third- 
year funding of the three-year, fed- 
erally-funded cooperative education 
program. 

For the first two years of the 
program, Northwestern has been 
the recipient of $230,379 in federal 
funds. The university was awarded 
a grant of $127,000 in September of 
1989 to cover costs for the program's 
first year. According to the grant, 
Northwestern will be providing 30 
percent of the funding for this third 
year. 

In the fall of 1987, Northwestern 
initiated a pilot cooperative educa- 
tion program in the Division of Busi- 
ness , independent of external funds. 
During this two-year period, uni- 
versity officials realized the impor- 
tance of the project in relation to its 
enhancement of the Northwestern 
student's job employment skills. 

The project has expanded to a 
university-wide based co-op pro- 
gram that is open to all disciplines. 
This program is considered to be 
important because it enables stu- 
dents to complete degrees in a timely 
manner and bridges the theoretical 
and practical basis for the world of 
work. 



"It gives our students that com- 
petitive edge over other students. 
The edge being that our students 
who participate in the program not 
only earn a degree, but they also can 
experience a year's worth of work 
experience in their major-related 
field of study," said Margaret 
Kilcoyne, director of the Coopera- 
tive Education Program. 

Kilcoyne, as a parent of a soon- 
to- be college student, said she would 
certainly consider in her plans 
whether the university her child 
plans to attend offers a co-op pro- 
gram. 

Last year's grant help 86 stu- 
dents to be placed in jobs, earning a 
combined income of $205,087.35. 
The students were placed not only 
in the local community, but also 
out-of-state. More than 50 employ- 
ers participated in the program, 
ranging from small businesses to 
major corporations. 

Cooperative Education has 
placed students with a variety of 
different industries such as 
Willamette Industries, Walt Disney 
World, Central Intelligence Agency, 
IBM, Nerco Oil and Gas, U.S. For- 
est Service, Red River Waterway 

■ Please see Co-op on page 4 



By LEIGH FLYNN 

Staff Writer 

When Brad Brown, a senior from 
Bogalusa, returned to Northwest- 
ern after a trip home last weekend, 
he was surprised to learn that he 
had been named Mr. NSU in the 
Student Government Association's 
recent run-off election. 

"People were saying 'Congratu- 
lations, Brad!' and I didn't know 
what I had done," said Brown. "It's 
quite an honor to know my peers 
think that much of me," said Brown. 
I didn't realize that many people 
thought that I deserved such an 
honor." 

He began thinking about run- 
ning for the title last year when a 



friend of his, Darryl Willis, was 
elected. "When Darryl won last 
year, I thought it would be neat to 
try for it. I asked someone in my 
dorm to nominate me, but I was just 
kidding at the time. I didn't think I 
would get it. 

"I'm not sure exactly what I'm 
supposed to do as Mr. NSU, but I 
will try to project a positive image 
as both an athlete and as a student. 
I think that it is very important to 
make a positive impression on fresh- 
men because they are at the stage in 
their lives where they make the 
decision to either be serious about 
school or to party their four years 
away." 

Brown, who is a junior wing- 
back and running back for North- 



western, describes himself as not 
being the stereotypical "jock." 

"Maybe that's why people respect 
me. My education comes first. That 
is the primary reason I am here," he 
said. 

Brown, a journalism major, will 
graduate in December. Soon after- 
wards, he will marry Sabrina 
Owens, a senior computer science 
major at Dillard University in New 
Orleans. Then, he plans to attend 
graduate school. 

"I do hope that I will be remem- 
bered as a person who made a posi- 
tive impact on people's lives during 
my time here and as someone who 
was always willing to lend a helping 
hand to someone in need," he said. 




_r_* i 4 « • • I . I t 1 



Page 2 



October 15, lgj 



Calendar 
of Events 

today 

Intramural Flag Football 



7 p.m.., 

SAB Movie Night features 
Lionheart in The Alley. 

Homecoming Court Recep- 
tion, President's Room in the 
Student Union 

7:30 p.m. 

Tartuffe', the Northwestern 
Theatre production in 
Theater West. 

WEDNESDAY 

3 p.m. 

SAB /Leisure Activities 
Festival Follies 

7:30 p.m. 

Tartuffe', the Northwestern 
Theatre production in 
Theater West. 

THURSDAY 

9:30 a.m. 

Richard Leaky will speak to 
students as part of the 
Distinguished Lecture Series 

5 p.m. 

Homecoming Parade and Pep 
Rally 

FRIDAY 

Purple and White Day 
7:30 p.m. 

Tartuffe', the Northwestern 
Theatre production in 
Theater West. 

8 p.m. 

Kentucky Headhunters in 
concert in Prather Coliseum 

SATURDAY 

Election Day 

10:30 a.m. 

Tailgate Party at Prather 
Coliseum parking lot 

2 p.m. 

Demon Football 
Demons take on McNeese 
Cowboys at Turpin Stadium 



News In Brief 



Law profesor speaks 

Professor David Rabban, one 
of the country's leading experts 
on the First Amendment, spoke 
at the Louisiana Scholars' 
College on Oct. 10. His lecture 
was entitled The Original 
Meaning of 'freedom of speech' in 
the First Amendment." 

Rabban, a professor of law at 
the University of Texas School of 
Law, has published numerous 
articles on the First Amendment 
in top law reviews throughout 
the United States. 

Among his writings are The 
Emergence of Modern First 
Amendment Doctrine" published 
by the University of Chicago 
Law Review in 1983 and The 
First Amendment in Its 
Forgotten Years," published by 
the Yale Law Review in 1981. 

Rabban was in private 
practice in New York City before 
becoming associate counsel for 
the American University of 
University Professors in 1986. 
He became counsel in 1980. 

He joined the faculty at the 
University of Texas School of 
Law in 1983 as an assistant 
professor and became a professor 
in 1986. 

Since joining the faculty at 
the University of Texas, he was 
a visiting professor at the 
University of Michigan in the 
fall of 1986 and was a visiting 
scholar at the American Bar 
Foundation in spring of 1987. 

Rabban was also the Lee 
Distinguished Visiting Professor 
at the College of William and 
Mary in 1989-90. 

Shuttlebus now 
transporting 

After a week in operation, the 
new Northwestern "Shuttlebus" 
does not seem to be making a 
significant impact on the campus 
parking problem, according to 
Police Chief Rickie Williams of 
the Northwestern Police. 

The idea of the shuttlebus 
was created by Dr. Robert Alost, 
president of the university, to 




Kervin Carnpbell participates in SAB's Star Search competition. 



offer a solution to the campus 
parking problem. The entire 
purpose is to allow commuters to 
park in the coliseum parking lot 
while offering a remedy for the 
long walk to the main part of 
campus. 

Actually a 15-passenger van, 
the shuttlebus is driven by Ron 
Luneau, a member of the 
Northwestern Police motor pool, 
from Prather Coliseum to the 
main part of campus near the 
Student Union and Kyser Hall. 
The trips are made about 20 
minutes before each class time 
and are free of charge. 

"I think it will work if the 
people use it," said Williams. Tf 
it was me getting a $5-parking 
ticket everyday, I would ride it." 

The lack of use by the students 
is due to the fact that very few 
people even know about the 
service, said Williams. 

Despite the posters around 
campus and an article in the 
Natchitoches Times announcing 
the service, only about 15-20 
students take advantage of the 
shuttlebus each day, said 
Williams. 

As of now, fuel for the 



shuttlebus is funded by 
Northwestern Police. A different 
sponsor will be found at a later 
date. 

Chemistry lecture 
to be held 

Danny Walker, director of 
environmental, health, medical 
and safety affiars for Hoechst 
Celanese Corporation, will speak 
at 2 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 18 in 
room 123 of Fournet Hall. 

Walker received his bachelor's 
and master's degrees in physical 
chemistry from Northwestern in 
'&8H0. Within Hoechst Celanese, 
he has held various positions 
including process support chemist, 
production engineer, major 
process start-up engineer, 
laboratory superintendent, unit 
supervisor, manufacturing/ 
operations manager, site manager 
and now, director for EHSA- 
Chemicals Group. 

Hoechst Celanese Corporation 
is a world leader in the 
manufacturing of chemicals, 
plastics, fibers, pharmaceuticals 
and specialty products. It is the 
sixth largest chemical company in 
the United States, and its parent 



company, Hoechst A.G., is the 
fourth largest in the world. 

Walker will talk about 
environmental, health and 
safety concerns in our 
community. 

Air Force interviews 
to be offered 

On Oct. 29, the Air Force 
civilian employment office will 
be on campus conducting 
interviews from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
The office has positions 
available in early childhood 
education and computer 
information systems. 

On Oct. 30, the Air Force 
auditing office and the Caddo 
Parish School System will be 
conducting interviews from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. The auditing 
office has positions available in 
accounting. The school system 
has positions available in all 
levels of education for students 
graduating in December and 
May. 

To schedule an interview or 
to obtain more information, 
come by the Career Planning 
and Placement office or call 357- 
5621. 

Midterm grades to be 
available Oct. 24-25 

Fall 1991 midterm grades 
will be distributed to 

Natchitoches non-dormitory 
student from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 
24-25. Midterm grades will not 
be available after Oct. 25. 

Natchitoches campus 
dormitory students will have 
their grades mailed to their 
NSU post office box. 

Students attending the 
Shreveport Nursing School, 
England Air Force Base campus 
and the Fort Polk campus 
should contact those campuses 
to find out the schedule for 
picking up midterm grades. 

For more information, call 
357-6171. 




Curren 
Sauce 



tober 



1, 




P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71497 

(UPS 140 - 660) 



How to reach the Sauce; 
To subscribe to The Sauce 



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There wil 



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y> Monday . 
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department 

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The Current Sauce is located in 
the Office of Student Publications^' 
225 Kyser Hall. 

The Current Sauce is published 
every week during the fall by the 
students of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not associ- 
ated with any of the university's de- 
partments and is financed indepen- 
dently. 

The deadline for all advertise- 
ments is 5 p.m. the Thursday be- 
fore publication. 

Inclusion of any and all mate- 
rial is left to the discretion of the 
editor. 

The Current Sauce will not be 
printed on November 26, 1991 dueto 
the university's Thanksgiving Holi- 
day. 

The Current Sauce is entered as 
second-class mail at Natchitocha, 
LA. 

Postmaster: send address changes to 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 
O Current Sauce 



ticularly Ei 
invited to 
eoiony- 

NSI 

tob< 



Student Government Association Minutes 9/30/91 



The meeting was called to order by 
Brent Cockrell at 7:02 p.m. Secretary 
Billingsley led the prayer, and Tina Foret 
led the pledge. Those officers and senators 
present were Scott Andrews, Beth 
Gowland, Todd Martin, Gwen Rutkowski, 
Kathy Allen, Jennifer Berry, Stacey 
Billingsley, Brent Cockrell, Derek 
Dietrich, Tina Foret, Oscar George, Julia 
Hinojosa, Kip Patrick, Nicole Rice, Andree 
Rizzo, Jake Ryan, Beth Weidel, Bobby 
Gunn, Ray Krull, Ted Methvin, Jacques 
Vilar, Amy Barnette, Jamie Lang, Bobby 
George, Jill Parker and Blake Rougeau. 
After Kathy Allen corrected the minutes, 
Andree Rizzo moved to approve the 
minutes as corrected, Bobby Gunn 
seconded. Passed 22-0. 
Officer Reports 

Treasurer: Todd announced that 
money spent to date should be available 
at the next meeting. He also stated that 
the finance committee met and decided 
to audit the Rodeo Team first. Last, he 
said that the encumbrances at the 
bookstore and at Wal-Mart should be 
installed by the end of the week. 

Vice-President: Beth announced that 
the election dates for the runoff election 
for Mr. NSU need to be approved. She 
passed around a sign-up -sheet «to work 
the polls, and noted that all senators 
needed to sign up for at least two hours. 
She also stated that all senators needed 
to come to count votes, as they will be 
hand ballots. Beth then announced that 
the point system would begin that 
evening, and that she expected to see 
some projects on the bulletin board in the 
office soon. 

President: Scott stated that the bylaws 
were ready and should be voted on next 
week, and that if anyone has a problem 
with any part of the bylaws they need to 
see Brent Cockrell or Stacey Billingsley. 
He announced that the senator 
information packets would be in boxes by 
Thursday. He said thatapplications were 
being accepted for parliamentarian for 
the SGA, and that a candidate should be 
offered for the senate's approval by next 
week. He then recognized Stan Broome 
and Blair Dickens, two Supreme Court 
Justices who attended the meeting. Stan 
Broome then announced that the 



Supreme Court planned to meet October 1, 
1991, at 3:30 p.m. to hear the case of 
Henrietta Collins vs. the Election Board. 
Receiving Reports and Motions 

Ray Krull moved to accept SGA 
Resolution #9105, Stacey Billingsley 
seconded. Brent Cockrell stated that the 
resolution was automatically tabled. Ray 
Krull moved to give the resolution 
emergency status, Jacques Vilar seconded. 
Discussion: Ray Krull explained the bill 
and the accompanying budget breakdown. 
He emphasized that a major portion of the 
cost was for equipment that would last for 
five years. Scott Andrews asked that the 
members of the soccer team present stand 
for recognition, and then stressed that 
Northwestern students received benefits 
from the team. Question was called. Passed 
22-0. 

The chair moved to accept SGA 
Resolution #9106, Beth Weidel seconded. 
Brent Cockrell stated that the resolution 
was automatically tabled. The chair moved 
to give emergency status to the resolution, 
Jacques Vilar seconded. Discussion: Todd 
Martin if the president of the university 
paid for the meal. Brent Cockrell stated 
that the president of the university did 
indeed pay for the meal. Andree Rizzo 
questioned who would handle the award. 
Brent Cockrell explained that the award 
was handled by the Internal Affairs 
committee, and would be awarded to any 
Northwestern faculty or staff member that 
contributed to the students. Question was 
called. Passed 21-0, one abstention. 
Jamie Long moved to approve the bylaws 
to the SGA Constitution, Oscar George 
seconded. Automatically tabled. 

Beth Weidel moved to allocate $750 for 
Homecoming expenses, Andree Rizzo 
seconded. Discussion: Beth Weidel 
explained how the money would be 
allocated. Question was called. Passed 22- 
0. 

Andree Rizzo moved to approve runoff 
election dates of October 2 and 3 for Mr. 
NSU, Beth Weidel seconded. Passed 22-0. 

Andree Rizzo moved that all senate 
members on the Election Board for the 
upcoming election, Stacey Billingsley 
seconded. Passed 20-0, two abstentions. 

The chair moved to appoint Jamie Lang 
as a nominee to the Disciplinarian 



Committee, Bobby Gunn seconded. 
Discussion: Mr. Fulton clarified the 
purpose of the stated committee. Question 
was called. Passed 21-0, one abstention. 
The chair moved to nominate Claire 
Breaux to the Committee on 
Organizations, Andree Rizzo seconded. 
Discussion: Mr. Fulton clarified the 
purpose of the committee. Question was 
called. Oscar George asked if another 
position existed on the committee; Scott 
Andrews stated that another position 
did indeed exist, and stated his criteria 
for selection of a nominee to the 
committee. Previous question was called. 
Passed 22-0 

The chair moved to appoint Darryl Ray 
to the Traffic and Safety committee , Beth 
Weidel seconded. Discussion: Scott 
Andrews explained the differences 
between the many traffic committees at 
North western, and told what Darryl Ray's 
duties would be as a member of the 
committee. Question was called. Passed 
20-0, two abstentions. 
Special Reports 

Beth Weidel gave a summary of events 
sponsored for SAB for that week. 
Jacques Vilar announced that Club 
Sports may meet to discuss the budget of 
the Flight Team, and that he had not 
heard from the Rifle Team, Swamp 
Demons, or the Sailing Club. 
Brent Cockrell announced that the 
Internal Affairs committee would meet 
on Thursday. 
Announcements 

Beth Weidel announced that Sigma 
Sigma Sigma Sorority is raffling off 100 
lottery tickets. 

Tina Foret announced that PRSSA is 
raffling off 50 lottery tickets. 

Kathy Allen announced thatTau Beta 
Sigma was holding a car wash on 
Saturday, October 5, 1991. 

Brent Cockrell announced that the 
College Republicans were hosting Clyde 
Holloway Wednesday, October 2, 1991 at 
7 p.m. in Room 142 of Kyser Hall. 

Bobby Gunn announced that Kappa 
Alpha was holding a slave auction on 
Tuesday, October 1, 1991. 

Bobby Gunn moved to adjourn the 
meeting, Jake Ryan seconded. Passed 
22-0. The meeting adjourned at 7:30 p.m. 



WHAT'S 

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The Oct 
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The Hoi 
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region, as v 
markets. I 
three Soutl 
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"We're e 
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said Greg 1 
director. 
| Several 
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r 15, 1991 

America" Chemical Society 

There will be a meeting at 5 p.m. 
5 \Jonday, Oct. 21 in room 123 of 

Iniversit, U« chemistry building. The calen- 
na 71497 ^forthesemesterwillbeplanned. 



News 



Page 3 




> Sauce; 

( Sauce 

357-52U 



357-545ft 
357-52ij 

357-5456; 
357-521J 



357-5456 
357-5096 
357-5456 
357-5456 
357-5293 
357-5456 



is located in 
blicationsin 



^on Batgirls 

-foe Demon Batgirls for the 1992 
-eball season are Beth Beadle, 
r" (jy Beshea, Debbie Caple, Dorie 
2°lette, Debi Cost, Paula Daly, 
ilissa Hanson, Angie Johnson, 
5 hra Lands, Scarlett Longlois, 
fe Uy Machen, Ashley Peterson, 
Kristen Salter, Cesely Stewart, Kim 
^ vlor , Holly Willrodt, Christina 
' es , Tania Yanes and Jennifer 
faerie. Kim McKinney and Kristi 
finders will serve as co-captains. 

fjgle Scouts 

An Eagle Scout Court of Honor is 
being pla nned in November for Wil- 
McCorkle, son of Drs. James 
^ De Ann McCorkle, who are 
members of the Departments of 
gocial Sciences and Language Arts. 
$ Northwestern scouts, and par- 
ticularly Eagle Scouts, are cordially 
invited to participate in this cer- 
emony- 



All interested scouts should con- 
tact Blair Dickens, Norwela Coun- 
cil representative to the 3 Rivers 
District at 357- 5770, or call Drs. 
James or De Ann McCorkle in their 
offices. Participation in this cer- 
emony will be greatly appreciated. 

Purple Jackets 

Purple Jackets are selling raffle 
tickets for a $100 prize. 

Members should turn their raffle 
money in Thursday to Tammy Clary 
in room 126W of Varnado. For more 
information, call Clary at 357-5005. 
Fashion Show 

Eta Chi and Rho Beta Omega 
Chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha are 
presenting "A Fall Preview." Pre- 
sented by "Roz" Kay of Private Col- 
lections Unlimited of New Orleans. 
The fashion show will be held at 8 
p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2 in the 
Student Union Ballroom. Tickets 
will be available at the door for $5. 

Music Educators National 
Conference 

The Music Educators National 
Conference has announced that ar- 



is published 
fall by til 
n State TJni- 
s not associ- 
versity's de- 
ed indepen- 1 



NSU-NLU football game 
to be televised live 



II advertise- 
in sday be- 1 



id all mate- 
etion of the 



will not be 
, 1991 dueto 
giving Holi- 



is entereda 
atchitochet, 



s changes to 
5306, NSU, 
1497. 




The Oct. 26 Northwestern De- 
mons—Northeast Louisiana Indi- 
ans game will be televised live at 7 
p.m. by Home Sports Entertain- 
ment. 

The Houston-based cable sports 
network has exposure in a five-state 
region, as well as selected national 
markets. Northwestern is one of 
three Southland Conference schools 
to host an HSE game. 

"We're excited about the oppor- 
tunity to showcase Northwestern 
and Natchitoches before a large tele- 
vision audience. It's important that 
the students put their best foot for- 
ward to create a festive college foot- 
ball atmosphere for the cameras," 
laid Greg Burke, assistant athletic 
director. 

Several activities have been 
planned to encourage student in- 
volvement. A sheet banner contest 
for open, dorm and Greek entries 
be held with cash prizes for 



winners. Signs such as "Hi mom, 
send money will be distributed at 
the game. 

The men's and women's intra- 
mural flag football champions from 
Northwestern and Northeast will 
meet in a challenge on game day. 

The Northeast Band, cheerlead- 
ers and students have been invited 
to the Student Activities Board tail- 
gate party near the coliseum. 

These special activities along 
with the spirit of the Northwestern 
- Northeast rivalry will convey a 
positive image to the three million 
viewers who will be watching the 
telecast, said Burke. 

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ranger/composer Randy Bass will 
be on campus for a guest lecture on 
Friday, Oct. 18. He will be speaking 
at 1p.m. in the Recital Hall of the 
Creative and Performing Arts build- 
ing. The public is invited to attend. 

The Spirit of Northwestern 
Marching Band will be performing 
The City of Angels," an arrange- 
ment by Bass, at the Homecoming 
game. 

New Course 

The Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion will be offering a class on First 
Aid and CPR, HED 1010 32N, for 
the B term. The class will be held 
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays 
from Oct. 19 to Dec. 10. For more 
information, contact the Office of 
Continuing Education at 357-4570. 

Phi Mu 

Those who attended Grub may 
order party pictures from 5:30 to 
7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the house. 
Call Janine at 352-6981 for infor- 
matioh. 

Members should work on the 
Homecoming float at 7 tonight and 
Wednesday 

Sigma Kappa 

There will be an Assassination 
Exchange with Theta Chi from 8 
p.m. to midnight on Wednesday. 

Society for Advancement of 
Management 

The Society for Advancement of 
M anagement is raffling two box seat 
tickets to the Saints vs. 49'ers game 
on Nov. 10 in the Superdome. The 
raffle will be held Oct. 31. Tickets 
cost $1. 

For more information contact 



outh China Restaurant 



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Every Tuesday & Thursday Night 



Reg. $9. 99 Special S 4.99 save $5.00 



# J. Imperial Chicken 
if 2. 'Boneless Chicken 

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Computer Forms 



Invitations 
Banners, etc. 



CREATIONS 

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P.O. Box 1 45 
Marthaville, LA 71450 



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318/472-9453 




Marjorie Stephens 




Police Jury- 
District 4 



Marjorie Stephens, announces her 
candidacy for the Natchitoches Parish Police 
Jury-District 4. Mrs. Stephens, wife of 
Harold Stephens, is native of England. She 
has resided in the Parish of Natchitoches for 
over twenty years. She has two children and 
two grandchildren. She is a legal assistant to 
Judge Marvin F. Gahagan, and has been 
employed by the law firm of Gahagan & 
Gahagan for the past twelve years. Mrs. 
Stephens has been in the legal field for the 
past thirty, years having worked for several 
prominent law firms in Louisiana. Mrs. 
Stephens feels that she is well qualified for 
the position as Jury Member because of her 
long association with legal work and will not 
be afraid to raise her voice to see that the 
interests of her constituents are upheld. "I 
feel that Parish Government is a civic duty 
and should be performed without recompense, 
with the exception of out of pocket expenses, 
and I will work to this end." 

'There is too much waste in all phases of 
government spending at the present time 
and on the parish level . I will do my best 
to reduce this." 



Paid political ad 



Mrs. Autrey at 357-5264, Tania at 
357-6943, or Melinda at 357-0179. 

Student Louisiana Association 
of Educators 

The 1991 Student Louisiana As- 
sociation of Educators officers were 
appointed on Oct. 2, and are as 
follows: Lisa Deen, president; 
Debbie Corbitt, vice president of 
membership; Blake Rougeau, vice 
president of programs; Teresa 
Smith, secretary; Sandra Smiley, 
treasurer; and Beth Kilpatrick, di- 
rector of programs. 

The SLAE is designed to develop 
a common bond between Education 
Majors and provide professional in- 
formation to its members. SLAE 
members' are covered by a $1 mil- 
lion liability insurance every time 
they step onto a classroom. Educa- 
tion majors are encouraged to join. 

Black Student Association 

The BSA will hold a meeting at 8 
p..m. on Wednesday in Kyser Hall 
Auditorium. T-shirts and member- 
ship cards are available in the BSA 
office. 

Pan-Hellenic 

There will be a meeting at 11 
a.m. Thursday in room 316 of the 
Student Union. The presidents and 
one representative of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta 
Sigma Theta, Phi Beta Sigma and 
Zeta Phi Beta are required to at- 
tend. For more information, contact 
Leonard A. Williams at 352-2639. 

Blue Key 

Blue Key will hold a meeting at 
11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Blue 
Key room. Blue Key members are 
reminded to pick up and distribute 
blotters this week. 





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Entry forms may be obtained: 
From 



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If no official entry form is available, you may write 
to: Poster Competition, c/o BSK, 1000 Geyer 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63104. 



Page 4 



News 



October 15, lJp c tober 15, 



Family Day programs well-attended 



By WENDY BYERS 

Staff Writer 

Family Day is fast becoming one 
of Northwestern's strongest 
traditions. 

More than 500 family members 
of Northwestern students gathered 
on campus Oct. 12 to enjoy the day's 
festivities, but more than the size 
made this year's crowd different 
than in the past. 

"It was really great because there 
were a lot more families here today 
and not just parents," said Gwen 
Rutkowski, who helped with the 
day's activities. 

The day offered everyone the 
chance to have fun. Parents and 
students were encouraged to 
participate in boating on Chaplin's 
Lake and a golf scramble at the 
Recreation Complex. There were 
also numerous bus tours for those 



unfamiliar with the campus. 

Later in the afternoon, 
registration for the Family Day 
Program was conducted in the Fine 
Arts Building. Students from 
organizations such as Blue Key, 
Purple Jackets and Student 
Activities Board assisted in 
welcoming and registering guests. 
All those attending Family Day 
received free tickets for the night's 
football game and the chance to 
enter the drawing for door prizes 
donated by local businesses. 

Miss Northwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet, Patty Breckenridge, 
served as Mistress of Ceremonies. 
Dr. Robert Alost and Scott Andrews, 
the Student Government 
Association president, began the 
program with welcomes from 
students and faculty. A special 
presentation was also given bv the 



Northwestern Chamber Choir. 
Northwestern's Yell Leaders, Purple 
Pizazz and Demon Dazzlers 
entertained the crowd by displaying 
their Demon spirit. 

The day continued with a tailgate 
party in the East Coliseum parking 
lot. "Domino" played while 
spectators enjoyed a cookout. 
Immediately following the party, 
fans gathered in Turpin Stadium to 
watch the Demons beat North Texas 
State. 

Carl Henry, director of Student 
Activities and Organizations, was 
pleased with the large attendance. 
He said his goal was to give all those 
attending Family Day a feel for the 
school. 

"I hope everyone will go away 
feeling a sense of family about the 
campus and get a real taste of 
Northwestern," Henry said. 



NATCHITOCHES B-TERM COURSES 
t 

BEGINS OCTOBER 21, 1991 THRU DECEMBER 20, 1991 



COURSE 
ENGL-101O-45N 

ENGU1020-45N 

ENGI^2050-45N 

ENGI^20«M5N 

PE -2080-0 IN 

HED -1010-32N 

MSCI-4050-O1N 

MSC1-4O6O-01N 

MSCI-4O70-O1N 

MSCI-4080-01N 



CREDIT 
3 hr. 

3br. 

3 hr. 

3 hr. 

2 hr. 

2 hr. 

1 hr. 

1 hr. 

1 hr. 

1 hr. 



Comp & Rhetoric I 
Comp & Rhetoric II 
Major Brilixh Wrilen 
Major American Writers 
Ufc|uanlln| 
First Aid & CPR 

Hauling A CuoJeremx 

Pract in Stair ring 
Reading & Report! 
Pract Meth of Inst 



TIME BLDO KM 

MW-5:0Opm - 8:00pm 081 341 

TR-5:00pm - 8:00pm 081 329 

MW-5:0Opm - 8:00pm 081 331 

MW-5:O0pm - 8:00pm 081 327 

MTWR-liOOpm - 1:50pm 028 121 

S-9:<- < - 3:00pm 089 1U 

ni-i - ll:50«m 0.11 103 

K-3:30pn. - 5:30pm 031 109 

R-3:30pm - 5:30pm 031 103 

R-3:30pm - 5:30pm 031 105 




CHRIS Mc 

Foster, J " • C,J; '"- 



Co-op: Program provides experience 



1/3 OFF SALE 



■ Continued from page I 

Commission, Con Agra Poultry, 
David Waskom, CPA; Johnson & 
Thomas, CPA; Natchitoches Parish 
Tax Assessor Office, Northwestern 
Small Business Development, 
Posey's Sport Center, Stuart Wright, 
attorney at law; Wal-Mart; Watson, 
Murchison, Crews, Arthur & 
Corkern; and the city of Natchi- 
toches. 

Guided by an advisory board, the 
Cooperative Education Program is 
designed to primarily provide work 
experience in the student's area of 
vocational career choice, establish 
work experiences for students with 
numerous major firms, create alter- 
nate semester periods of work and 
academic study for participating 

Britt: Family 

continues to 
show support, 
strength 

■ Continued from page l 
be the most emotional initially, but 
that she presently seems to be show- 
ing the most strength. 

The somber mood also seemed to 
pervade the Demon locker room 
before Saturday night's game, said 
Goodwin. 

"I got in before the game, and 
everyone had a blank look on their 
face," said Goodwin. "I don't know 
what to attribute it to —the start of 
the crucial conference race or Bill's 
situation. I was just scared we 
weren't emotionally ready to play. 

"Usually, I turn the last few min- 
utes of the pregame speech over to 
the seniors, and I don't want to be in 
there because the language some- 
times isn't what I want to be around. 
But I stayed out for five or 10 min- 
utes, and I didn't hear a thing." 

Those wishing to donate to the 
fund can send donations to the Bill 
Britt Support Fund, Exchange 
Bank, P.O. Box 446, Natchitoches, 
LA 71457. 

Cards and letters may be mailed 
to Bill Britt, Our Lady of the Lake 
Hospital, 5000 Hennessy Boulevard, 



students and ease the transition 
from an academic environment into 
a career occupation. 

In addition, it is enhancing the 
overall academic performance of the 
student by bringing work experi- 
ence into the classroom and foster- 
ing a more meaningful partnership 
between industry and higher edu- 
cation, while providing professional 
development for faculty and staff. 

Students admitted to the Coop- 
erative Education Program at 



Northwestern can receive super- 
vised work experience by securing 
20 hours-per-week employment 
while continuing their studies on 
campus or leave the campus for one 
semester to work as full-time em- 
ployees. All work must be in an 
academic-related field. 

"The importance of challenging 
the student and providing a mean- 
ingful experience is a key factor in 
the success of the program," said 
Kilcoyne. 



CRIME 

ON CAMPUS 

Monthy Crime Report for September 
THEFT 

Felony (over $100) 10 

Misdemeanor 4 

Total property losses $4,256.00 

Total property recovered $3,628.00 

Cases cleared 3 

BURGLARY 

From buildings 3 

Total property losses $1,174.00 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

Number of vehicle thefts 1 
Recovered 1 




BATTERY 

Aggravated 
Simple 

ASSAULT 

Aggravated 



1 

5 



MISCELLANEOUS OFFENSES 

1 

3 

$250.00 



Attempted Suicide 
Vandalism 
Amount of damage 



ARRESTS 

Student 

Non-student 

Juvenile 

Felony 

Misdemeanor 



Source: Northwestern Police 



6 
1 


3 
4 



\ s ^orts Editor 
■j on a night w 
IlLrts of many 
^another matt 
E|]en spirits f 
Ceded cheer a 

Lry. 

With though 

kgjjmateweigl 
Lids, the Nor 
[piled the North 
I Saturday night 
LopenSouthla: 
Lij, e Demons irn 
Li-OintheSL 

Ln to i-3-i ov< 

Lnce action. 



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item in store, from 
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October 21, 1991 



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GO 



I The game m< 
I inception of cor 
also represente 
U Demon offen 
| was paralyzed 
I ^nt a week b« 
remai ns ' n Bate 
Lf the Lake Ret 
Iter. Dedicating 
I the Demons w 
LithBritt's nm 
The players 
I mood manifest) 
Ifensive breakdi 
[early stages. A 
nessed three s 
[the Demon offer 
iTexas the ball 
yard line and i 
Saglesatthe De 
converted the tu 
town and a fid 
: Northweste 
Peon Ridgell, \ 
(aids on 20 car 
bpaydirttogh 
lead with 11:13: 
ir. But Ridge 
Hcond straight 
^performance, a 
es' first sc 
k andoff and kicl 
i the Demon ( 




NCA 

Top : 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

19. 
20. 



Nevac 
Easte 
Holy ( 
Villam 
North 
Sam I 
Middli 
Marsr 
Furmi 
Jame 
Alaba 
New I 
Boise 
Delav 
North 
Appa 
Web€ 
(tie) V 
Samf 
Missi 
Lehig 



4 

i 



1991 S 

as o 



AIL 
Houston 
^fthwesterr 

^thwestTe 
N °iheast 

J^h Texas 
Shen F. At 




tober 15, to^ber 15, 1991 



Page 5 



INST 

NOOQ,|| 

Bell, D 
Rom, 
Ingram, l 

Paler, j J 
Fotler, J 



SUPER SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 



LSU 70, Arkansas State 14 
Nevada 41, Idaho State 20 
Brigham Young 31, UTEP 29 
East Texas 24, Texas A&I 22 



McNeese 10, Northeast 10 
Southwest Texas 31, SFA 15 
Sam Houston 28, Nicholls 19 



Demons win for Britt in 24-10 victory 




8y CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

On a night when the minds and 
^jrts of many tended to gravitate 
w another matter, a team of crest- 
fallen spirits found some much- 
pggded cheer and comfort in vic- 

With thoughts of their paralyzed 
Inmate weighing heavily on their 
njnds, the Northwestern Demons 
.rolled the North Texas Eagles 24-10 
Saturday night in Turpin Stadium 
to ope n Southland Conference play. 
Sfhe Demons improved to 3-2 over- 
lie 1-0 in the SLC , a*d North Texas 
WtMto 1-3-1 overall, 0-1 in confer- 
ence action. 



alt 




The game marked more than the 
inception of conference warfare. It 
g)so represented "Bill Britt Night." 
A Demon offensive lineman, Britt 
wa s paralyzed in a hunting acci- 
dent a week before the game and 
remains in Baton Rouge's Our Lady 
f the Lake Regional Medical Cen- 
ter. Dedicating the game to Britt, 
the Demons wore a helmet decal 
irith Britt's number 71 on it. 

The players' subdued pregame 
mood manifested itself in some of- 
fensive breakdowns in the game's 
early stages. A crowd of 9,300 wit- 
nessed three straight fumbles by 
the Demon offense, one giving North 
Texas the ball at the Demon one- 
yard line and another placing the 
Eagles at the Demon 18. The Eagles 
converted the turnovers into a touch- 
down and a field goal. 
Northwestern running back 
n Ridgell, who rushed for 113 
on 20 carries, raced 20 yards 
paydirt to give the Demons a 7-0 
with 1 1 : 1 3 left in the first quar- 
But Ridgell, who enjoyed his 
lecond straight 100-yard rushing 
performance, actually set up the 
es' first score by fumbling a 
[kandoff and kicking the ball back to 
the Demon one, where Joey 



NCAA l-AA 
Top 20 Poll 

1. Nevada 

2. Eastern Kentucky 

3. Holy Cross 

4. Villanova 

5. Northern Iowa 

6. Sam Houston 

7. Middle Tennessee 

8. Marshall 
9- Furman 

10. James Madison 

11. Alabama State 

12. New Hampshire 

13. Boise State 
H. Delaware 

15. Northeast Louisiana 

16. Appalachian State 

17. Weber State 

(tie) Western Illinois 

19. Samford 

20. Mississippi Valley 
Lehigh 




1991 STANDINGS 

as of 10-13-91 



ah Games Confrence 
; a,1 i Houston 4-0-1 1-0-0 



No 



n hwestern 



eese 
Whwest Texas 



>east 
N %lls 
m Texas 
' 8 Wien F. Austin 1-4-0 



3-2-0 

2- 2-1 

3- 2-0 

4- 1-1 
2-4-0 
1-3-1 



1-O-0 

1- 0-1 

2- 1-0 
1-1-1 
1-3-0 
0-1-0 
0-1-0 



Southland 
Conference 




Senior wide receiver Victor Robinson attempts to elude three North Texas defenders in last Saturday's 24-1 Demon victory. 



Missildine plunged in from a yard 
to pull North Texas into a 7-7 tie. 

The Demons coughed up the foot- 
ball again, with North Texas recov- 
ering at the Demon 18. 
Northwestern's "Purple Storm" de- 
fense stamped out any Eagle effec- 
tiveness offensively, holding North 
Texas to a 19-yard field goal to give 
the visitors a 10-7 lead with 6:20 
remaining in the first quarter. 

"It's pretty hard to keep someone 
from scoring when you give them 
first and goal at the one," said De- 
mon coach Sam Goodwin. "I thought 
it was a turning point in the game 
on the next drive when we fumbled 
and held them to just the field goal." 

While the Demons struggled of- 
fensively in the early going, the 
Northwestern defense established 
itself early and refused to hedge for 
most of the game. North Texas 
managed only 285 total yards. 

"As long as North Texas had bad 



field position, we kept them backed 
up," said Goodwin. "When they did 
get one long drive on us late in the 
fourth quarter, we forced a fumble 
and recovered." 

Northwestern's Ail-American 
linebacker Andre Carron accumu- 
lated a whopping 21 tackles to lead 
the "Purple Storm," which held the 
Eagles to an anemic one successful 
third-down conversion in 13 tries. 
In its first fifteen possessions, the 
Eagles' longest drive was an 11- 
play, 32-yard effort. 

The Demons recaptured the lead 
for good late in the first quarter 
when Brad Brown, the Demons' erst- 
while quarterback, scampered four 
yards for a touchdown, capping a 
nine-play, 80-yard drive ignited by 
a 33-yard pass from Chris Gilliam 
to Victor Robinson. 

The Demons increased their lead 
to 17-10 with 3:57 remaining in the 
first half when kicker Jeff Powell 



drilled a 42-yard field goal to polish 
off a short drive of seven plays and 
29 yards. 



Northwestern iced the game mid- 
way through the fourth quarter on a 
50-yard scoring toss from Gilliam to 
James McKellum, who caught the 
pass 15 yards downfield on the right 
sideline and employed blocks by 
receiver Carlos Jones and center 
Harlan Hughes to glide into the end 
zone. Powell's extra point gave the 
Demons a 24-10 lead with 8:44 re- 
maining in the game. 

Gilliam completed seven of 14 
passes for 148 yards and just missed 
on other connections. Although 
Goodwin said his redshirt freshman 
quarterback missed on three passes 
that could have been touchdowns, 
he expressed general pleasure with 
Gilliam's performance and remains 
cautiously optimistic. 

"I think we saw a better defen- 
sive football team in North Texas 
than we did in East Texas," said 
Goodwin. "We had worked with 
Gilliam on not throwing behind our 
receivers, and he overthrew (John) 
t Tappin, which is pretty hard to do." 



DEMON BOX 



NSU 
UNT 



14 
10 



24 
10 



NSU-Deon Ridgell 20 run (Jeff 
Powell kick). 

UNT-Joey Missildine 1 run (Kevin 
McDaniel Kick). 

UNT-McDaniel 19 Field Goal. 

NSU-Brad Brown 4 run (Powell kick). 

NSU-Powell 42 Field Goal. 

NSU-James McKellum 50 pass from 
Chris Gilliam (Powell kick). 

A-9,300 



T-3:04 



YARDSTICK 

First Downs 
Rushes-Yards 
Passing Yards 
Att-Comp-Int 
Total Offense 
Fumbles-Lost 
3rd Down Conversions 1-11 
Punts-Avg 6-29 
Time of Possession 29:43 



NSU 

18 

48-176 
148 
14-7-0 
326 
4-4 



UNT 

12 
36-169 
116 
27-11-1 
285 
4-2 
1-13 
11-36 
30:17 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

Rush ing-NSU, Deon Ridgell 20- 

1 1 3, Brad Brown 1 1 -58, John Tappin 2-34, 

Chris Gilliam 9-37, Kelvin Pierre 6-8. UNT, 

Travis Gibson 7-50. 

Passing-NSU, Chris Gilliam 7- 

14-0-148. UNT, Mitch Mahler 11-27-1- 

116. 

Receiving-NSU, Victor 
Robinson 4-64, James McKellum 1-50, 
Steve Brown 1 - 1 7, John Tappin 1-17. UNT, 
Charles White 5-22. 



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Page 6 



Sports 



October 15, \§ 



October 15, 



Explosive Tappin dangerous weapon in Demon arsenjj^jjj 



By CHRIS McGEE 

Sports Editor 

Question: What do land mines, 
dynamite and John Tappin have in 
common ? 

Answer: Each could explode at 
any moment. 

Riddles aside, Tappin, 
Northwestern's senior All- 
Southland Conference receiver, 
poses an imperiling factor for any 
defense anytime he clutches the pig- 
skin. With 4.36 speed in the 40- 
yard dash and a repertoire of eva- 
sive moves, Tappin has established 
himself as a threat to score at any 
moment from any spot. 

Tappin made a profound impact 
on the SLC as a junior last year. 
The Bastrop native proved an all- 
purpose threat, catching 24 passes 
for 444 yards, scoring three touch- 
downs and rushing eight times for 
139 yards. 

Along the way, Tappin collected 
plenty of recognition, being anointed 
with Fir st Team All-SLC status and 
being named SLC Offensive Player 
of the Week twice. The pint-sized 
jet-setter even showcased a propen- 



sity for the big play, hauling in touch- 
down receptions of 76 and 66 yards 
and taking a reverse 74 yards for a 
score against Sam Houston. 

In fact, Tappin's visits to the end 
zone became such a frequent occur- 
rence that he decided to make rev- 
elry of the situation, thus engender- 
ing the "Tap Dance." 

As he safely reaches the goal 
line, Tappin launches into the "Tap 
Dance," a ritual analogous to a fast- 
paced, wide-strided duck walk. 
Tappin is an original, but the dance 
is borrowed from his idol, Andre 
Rison, the brash showman of the 
Atlanta Falcons. 

"The dance really isn't mine," 
said Tappin. "I like Andre Rison of 
the Atlanta Falcons a lot. I picked it 
up from him. 

"Next to Jerry Rice, he's one of 
the best receivers in the league. I 
just like him. He excites the crowd, 
and I like to excite the crowd." 

Exciting the crowd is something 
that comes naturally to Tappin, who 
is more of an entertainer with the 
open field his stage. He's usually 
solid gold when his number is called. 



But some observers muttered that 
he wasn't being called upon often 
enough, a situation that Demon 
coach Sam Goodwin set about to 
redress before the season started. 

"We've got to get Tapp the ball 
more this year," said Goodwin prior 
to the season. "We figure at least 
one out of every four times he has it, 
hell make something big happen. 
We want to get him the ball eight to 
10 times per game, and we think 
our point production will climb." 

However, Goodwin's campaign 
to involve Tappin more was delayed 
when the diminutive receiver sus- 
tained a bruised shoulder that kept 
him out of action for most of the first 
two games. But "Tapp," as team- 
mates call him, still meditates on 
getting the ball more, sometimes to 
distraction. 

"Yeah, it bothers me," said 
Tappin. "I would like to be involved 
in the offense a little more. I think 
I can help the team, especially when 
it's third and long. But I know I'm 
not the only guy who is a threat. We 
have other people that are explo- 
sive." 



Good news may be in the offing 
for Tappin. With Goodwins recent 
proclamation of Chris Gilliam as 
his new quarterback, the Demon 
czar is moving erstwhile quarter- 
back Brad Brown to Tappin's 
wingback spot and inserting Tappin 




at wideout. The move should ben- 
efit the 5-foot-8, 158-pound Tappin, 
who, as a wingback, was often com- 
missioned with the unenvious task 
of blocking linebackers. 

"I'm looking forward to moving 
outside," said Tappin. "I only weigh 
158, and blocking on linebackers as 
a wingback takes its toll. I think 111 
see the ball more outside." 

Many observers feel Tappin could 
be the next in a lineage of talented 
Northwestern receivers to reach the 
National Football League, a thought 
that Tappin occasionally ponders. 

"All I want is just a chance. I just 
need a shot," said Tappin. "I think 
I can play pro ball. Right now, I'm 



just concentrating on running^ jqN TERI 
routes and catching the ball, h ^ ^ s Editor. 
want to stay healthy." $P° A rusn f p \ 

Staying healthy is one oflW ^ es helpe< 
true concerns, for NFL scoi^ W ,, ey ball tearr 
watching. Although some f ea , t * '^nastr, 
Tappin's injuries ar.d lack f (, with tw 
handlingopportunitiesmaypr^^ Qne lo8S 



him from being noticed, Ta 



The Lady 



says the scouts know what he ((i;jite dPrather< 
do. vht and were 

"The scouts say don'tworry a | j r°t7 ) 15-8. Fre 
not getting many opportui^ dK ^ re n Hill; 
said Tappin. "They just say to J"^,. seC ond 
healthy and keep playing. ButC year with 

"Tit?" f • . • ^cuvely, 
And his professional aspir at jJ! L, lle Guidr 
may run even better. 



HSE to broadcast Demon basketball game 



Northwestern State's Feb. 10 
home men's basketball game against 
Nicholls State will be televised live 
by Home Sports Entertainment, the 
Southland Conference announced 
Tuesday. 

Associate commissioner Pam 
Rapkin said the Northwestern- 
Nicholls matchup in Prather Coli- 
seum is among four games included 
in the 1992 HSE-SLC basketball 
schedule, along with the Jan. 25 
Northeast at Sam Houston game, 
North Texas at Texas-Arlington on 
Feb. 15 and Texas-San Antonio at 
Stephen F. Austin on Feb. 29. 

"We're very excited to have a home 
game on TV," said Demon coach Dan 
Bell. "Now the challenge is for us to 
be good by that time of the year - 
have a legitimate team, be in the 



conference race, those kinds of 
things." 

The Demons return three All-SLC 
players, the most of any school: se- 
nior point guard Roman Banks, jun- 
ior forward Dexter Grimsley and 
junior guard Jay Scherer. Scherer is 
a returning GTE/CoSIDA District 
VI Academic Ail-American who led 
Northwestern with a 17.0 point scor- 
ing average last season. 

The academic performance of the 
Demon team was a selling point for 
Northwestern athletic director Tynes 
Hildebrand. The squad compiled a 
composite 2.6 grade point average 
last spring and each player is on 
course to graduate with his class. 

"HSE seemed really interested in 
us, in that we're trying to do a pro- 



Freshmen keeping 
cross country on pace 



By JON TERRY 

Sports Editor 

Freshman Maryalyce Walsh 
scored a one and a half second victory 
over McNeese's Kari Ange to lead 
the Lady Demon cross country team 
to a second-place finish in the 10-K 
NSU Invitational Saturday at the 
Wilson Recreation Center. 

Conference rival Sam Houston 
bested NSU by having five of the top 
ten runners, as compared to only 
two for NSU. Finishing behind 
Northwestern were Northeast, 
McNeese, Lamar, Grambling, 
Stephen F. Austin, and LeTourneau. 

Walsh, who has placed in the top 
two in every race this season, won 
the three-mile event with a time of 
17:34.18. Placing after her were Judy 
Norris ( 18:50.67 ) at sixth, Marie Gipe 
(19:24.49) at 11th, Dianne Dubay 
(19:56.63) at 16th, Carla Davison 
(20:21.30) at 18th, Julie Martin 



(21:13.00) at 22nd, and Karen 
Current (21:36.59) at 24th. 

Freshman Damien Rosado led the 
men's team to a fourth place finish 
with second place time of 26:23.11. 
Stephen F. Austin, Lamar and 
Northeast all finished ahead of 
Northwestern in the standings, each 
with at least two runners in the top 
ten. NSU outran Sam Houston, 
McNeese, LeTourneau and 
Grambling. 

Finishing behind Rosado on the 
four-mile course were Brad Seivers 
(27:30.89) at 14th, Billy Gaines 
(28:08.54) at 22nd, Les McMullen 
(28:27.62) at 25th, Red O'Laughlin 
(28:34.35), Eric Metoyer (28:54.17) 
at 32nd, Tim Rosas (29:47.35) at 
37th, Robby Bryer, Carlos 
Thompson, Slade Lewis and Danny 
Broughton. 

The cross country squads will 
return to action Monday in Monroe 
at the Northeast Invitational. 



Date: ffif/j/lj ? , ,'^Time: 7- gg '3. CO Reared: ' J5'.G0 

It i 1 

Place / t ,! n\- pCcLSLoicL 

Meet with vuur losten-; (epresewmtive for full details See our 



omplete ring selection on display in your college bookstore 

91-288 (CST 491 



gram the right way. That appealed 
to them, that we have the most all- 
conference players back, we have an 
Academic All-District player back, 
we have the record of performance in 
the classroom," said Bell. "And the 
fact that with a sophomore and fresh- 
man team last year, we had 12 games 
decided in the last minute, not many 
going our way, and you'd have to 
stretch the imagination not to think 
things will go the other way with a 
year's experience." 

Banks sat out nearly the entire 
season and received a medical hard- 
ship year because of a hamstring 
injury. Without their pointguard, the 
Demons went 6-22. 

All five starters, plus Banks, are 
on hand this season. Preseason pub- 
lications have picked Northwestern 



to challenge for the SLC lead. 

"If we take care of our business 
and get people excited about our 
team, we hope we can have the kind 
of crowd support for this game that 
we've had for the TV games our 
football team has hosted," said Bell. 
"It'd be real important to our pro- 
gram to make this game a happen- 
ing." 

Tipoff will be 7:30, said 
Hildebrand. 



Free Scholarship 

Information for students. 
Please call for free brochure. 
Results guaranteed. 
1-800-937-1797 Ext 15 




Saturday, 
iru velled to IV 
^rtheast Toui 



(TCS) 

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Expires Oct.31 




Dr. Do 
Mr He 

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COLljCfATE 
A_ I C U li O L 

4 w**. s y e s s 



Because during National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week, your school 
will host all kinds of activities and pre- 
sentations focusing on the safe and 
responsible consumption of alcohol by 
students of legal drinking age. Among 
the activities is a "Know When To Say 
When" poster contest that pays a 
$5,000 scholarship for the poster that 
most creatively and effectively promotes responsible drinking. 

Sponsored in part by Anheuser-Busch, NCAAW is about 
the health, safety and social issues you face when you drink. 
It's about avoiding abusive drinking situations. And it's 
about adding to your margin of safety, and that of everyone 
else, by drinking responsibly. 



It's certainly something worth talking about. So why not 
get in on the conversation. 

National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week is the kind 
of grass roots program that Anheuser-Busch supports to 
encourage responsible drinking by adult collegians. For 
more information on this and other programs, contact 
NCAAW, Fort Hays State University, 600 Park Street, Hays, 
Kansas 67601-4099 or your local Anheuser-Busch 
wholesaler. 




FRIENDS KNOW WHEN 
TO SAY WHEN " 




r 




cto ber 15, 1991 



Sports 



Page 7 



Q pecovered Lady Demons win two 
Wealthy players help in volleyball victories 



inning 
ball. ] 



; jON TERRY 

Editor. 

Arush of players returning from 
; °^ a P(l . juries helped the Lady Demon 
sc °ut8| (0 || e yball team to their best week 
116 ^ ear 1 ^season as they upped their record 
3C k °^ w6-l* with two more victories and 
° ay H^ one loss. 

' ^ a Pj The Lady Jags of Southern 
' nat he < Prather Coliseum Wednesday 
^jjtand were soundly whipped 15- 
"OTy ak, ?]5.7, 15-8. Freshmen Shera Dowell 
ortunitita n<J j^ren Hill led the Lady Demons 
sav tostj n their second win over Southern 
^^'i^is year with seven and five kills 
ei pectively, and sophomore 
aspiratj, jjjchelle Guidry added four service 

Saturday, the Lady Demons 
^veiled to Monroe to play the 
Northeast Tournament. In the first 



game, Northwestern beat Grambling 
15-10, 15-12, 13-15, 15-6, improving 
NSU's all-time record against the 
Lady Tigers to 9-0. 

Claire Gilmartin returned from 
the ranks of the injured to score 14 
kills for the Lady Demons. Shera 
Dowell had 17 kills and seven service 
aces, and Sandi Sherrell added 6 
aces, as NSU scored a record 24 
service aces in the match. 

But Northwestern ran out of 
gas at the end of the night, losing a 
heartbreaker to conference rival 
Northeast 6-15, 8-15, 17-15, 15-10, 
15-17. NSU had 17 more aces in this 
match, including four each by Claire 
Gilmartin and and Sandi Sherrell. 
Gilmartin also had 17 kills, and 
Shera Dowell had 16. 

"The team played really well at 



the Northeast Tournament," said 
coach Rickey McCalister of his 
recently-healed team. "Northeast 
was hitting the ball hard and we 
managed to put up some good blocks. 
In the fifth game, usingrally scoring, 
we managed to go from 10-14 to 15- 
14 before losing 17-15." 

With the statistics from the 
recent games, Shera Dowell has 
moved into fourth place on the season 
kills list with 221. Senior Sandi 
Sherrell is ranked third for aces in a 
season with 56, and Janice Graham 
is third in career block assists with 
123. 

This week, the Lady Demons 
will travel to Stephen F. Austin 
Tuesday and then Sam Houston to 
continue their conference schedule. 



Softball plays fall practice games 



By BOB WEATHERS 

Staff Writer 

The Lady Demon softball team 
ended its fall practice schedule with 
a win at Louisiana Tech. 

The Lady Demons battled the 
Lady Techsters to a 0-0 score in the 
first game and won the second game 
2-0. 

The first score came in the third 
inning from a series of good offensive 
plays. Freshman Jennifer Painter 
got on base with an infield bunt 
single. Junior Sandi Sherrill 
sacrificed Painter to second, and 
junior Nicole Kilgore grounded out, 
putting Painter on third. With two 
outs, junior Amy Grisham, lead-off 



batter, hit a two-strike RBI single to 
give NSU a 1-0 lead. 

The second and final score of the 
game was another group effort, 
starting with a single by senior 
Ladine Thomas, who was sacrificed 
over to second by Kilgore. Grisham 
singled, sending Thomas across to 
third base. Grisham then attempted 
to steal second, drawing the throw 
and giving Thomas enough time to 
get across home plate. 

"We hit the ball good, we should 
have had more runs. A few calls 
took us out of some scoring 
opportunities, but that's going to 
happen," said Coach Rickie 
McCalister. He credits good defense 
and excellent pitching by senior 



Nancy Percle, junior Claudia Percle, 
senior Jemi LaHaye and freshman 
Kristi Parcel for the win. The Lady 
Demon pitchers haven't been scored 
on in the last 22 innings. 

According to Coach McCalister, 
the fall softball schedule is designed 
to give everyone the chance to play. 
Freshmen and incoming players get 
experience, and they can try 
different positions. 



The Lady Demons will open their 
spring season with a two-day 
tournament at Southern Mississippi 
on Feb. 7. The first home game will 
be a doubleheader against Louisiana 
Tech on Feb. 18. 



t 



used 
)ther 
cial. 

nter 



Homecoming Festival Follies 
Wednesday, October 16th 
3:00pm, ROTC Field 




GAMES - PRIZES - FUN 



\ NSU Students Want You 
As Pie In The Face Targets 




Dr. Dobbins 

Mr. Harold Boutte' 
Dr. Hanson 
Mr. Alan Omo 
Mrs. Vickie Parrish 



Dr. Barron 

Ms. Marsha Zulick 
Dr McCorkle 
CPT Baham 
Dr. Gene Newman 



Mr Ron Wright 
Mr. Gene Jeffords 

Dr. Hugh Durham 

Dr. Jack Wann 



For Additional Information 
Please Call 357-5461 or 357-651 1 



Team Representative 
Meeting TONIGHT 
Tuesday, Oct. 1 5th 
6:30pm, SAB Office 



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DdH OJH OiH OdH OJH OdX 0£H CMHH 04H 



Page 8 



Editorial 



October 15, 1^ 




Current Sauce 



Van Rodney Reed 

Editor 

Elizabeth McDavid Harris 

Managing Editor 
Michelle Genre 
News Editor 
Chris McGee 
Sports Editor 
Jon Terry 
Sports Editor 
Leonard A. Williams 
Lifestyle Editor 
Todd Martin 
Business Manager 



Brad Brown 
Wendy Byers 
Troy Conkk 
Let Coriell 
Eric Dutile 
Leigh Fly nn 
Judy Francis 
Tina Koret 
Chris Gleason 
Maria Jones 



Ann Marie Kinard 
Jason Oldham 
Ashley Peterson 

Paul Parker 
Paul Pickering 
Mary Porth 
Mike Thorn 
Jennifer Roy 
Brian Shirley 
Amy Staszak 



Staff 

Shawn Blank Tony Means 

Marty Bran ham Chris Young 

Lex Harwell 

Plwlographers 
Russ Harris 

Anisi 

Eben Cook Chris Need ham 

Advertising 
Scott Milks 
Circulation 
Tom Whitehead 

Adviser 



EDITORIAL 



Co-op Program 
Gets A plus 



The Office of Cooperative Education is one 
of those departments on campus that is seldom 
in the lime light, but recently the Co-op office has 
been working hard to give students the 
opportunity to get real-life job training during 
their school year. 

Students participating in the Cooperative 
Education program alternate periods of study on 
campus with periods of working on the job. This 
helps the student decide if they have chosen the 
correct profession and give them experience in 
that profession. 

When employers hire Northwestern 
graduates they are investing in their company's 
future. With Co-op students, companies get the 
chance to try-out their employees before actually 
hiring them. This helps to improve the company, 
as well as the student. 

The office has heavily recruited 
Northwestern students for jobs at Walt Disney 
World, the CIA, the FBI, Willamete Industries, 
Con Agra, and IBM. The list goes on featuring 
numerous companies. 

The Co-op office has just received another 
$73,000 in funding to continue its work. This is a 
plus for Northwestern. The national recognition 
of the office and its students continues to help 
Northwestern shine. 



SAB deserves applause 

The Student Activities Board continues to 
improve each year. 1991 has become an 
incredible year for Northwestern students with 
bands, tailgate parties, Star Search competitions, 
and a spectacular Homecoming planned. 

The Board has come a long way over the 
past couple of years and seems to improve with 
each endevor. 

Linda Davis and her staff deserves the 
respect and thanks of all. 



Current Sauce Editorial Policy 

All correspondence, including letters to the editor, is welcome. 
Material submitted for consideration may be mailed to P.O. Box 5630, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497 or brought by the Office of Student 
Publications in 225 Kyser Hall. 

Letters to the editor must include the author's classification and 
hometown, as well as a telephone number where the writer can be reached. 
No anonymous letters will be printed. The Current Sauce reserves the 
right to edit all correspondence. 

Inclusion of any and all material is left to the discretion of the editor. 



How Northwestern 
Can Recycle Five Grand 



ALOST FAMILY 
MANTLE PIECE 



END TABLE 



DESK TOPS 



BOOK ENDS 




SAM'S 




CLIPBOARD 





SAVE THE WOODEN 



DEMON 



BASEBALL BAT 



CHOPSTICKS 
POOL CUES 



NAME PLATES 
TOOTH PICKS 
§f CLOTHE?PIN?^^ 




PINK 



ELEPHANT 



Letter to the Editor 



Goodwin proud of Northwestern 



fr( 



People as 
^butldo 
p, vs have si 
the way my h 
a phallic sy 
itbellious th 
hair long be 
rebellious. I 
became rebe 
thought the 
something tc 
my work. 

I was luck 
Alfalfa Vid 
though I had 
jomeone wh 
and could j 
section off th 
because of d 
manager. O 
itas her sug 
hair cut, ev« 
' iianager hac 



Sam Goodwin, Demon Football 
Coach 

Northwestern can be proud of its 
faculty, staff, students, alumni and 
supporters. Everyone has rallied 
around Bill and Kelli Britt. Bill was 
to undergo surgery on Thursday of 
last week and needed donors for his 
rare blood type. 

We would like to extend our ap- 
preciation to these donors: Rickie 



Williams, chief of University Police; 
Crystal Miller, student trainer; 
Ricky Jones, teammate; Mrs. Dulcy 
Hayes, parent and supporter; and 
Steve Pezant, former equipment 
manager. On Monday when we 
began looking for donors, it looked 
like we would not find anyone, then 
we began to receive calls from these 
people. They dropped everything to 
drive to Baton Rouge on Tuesday 



morning to help Bill. 

We would also like to thank Ja- 
son Oldham and KNWD for initiat- 
ing the campus-wide get well card. 
We know that Bill and his family 
appreciate all of the concern shown 
to them. Phone calls, cards and 

letters continue to pour in. There 
are lots of people who deserve 
thanks , but too many to list them all 



(NSU staff, students, alumni, citi- 
zens of Natchitoches Parish a&l 
friends of Bill's and Kelli's and thi 
university). All of you have our 
deepest appreciation. 



I quit in 
thought woi 
find another 
jf unemplo} 
lateAugust. 
than 20 ap 
hired by AR 

Fast foe 
excuse of lc 
food.blatani 
they ahead; 
them who 
|bjisinesses \ 
(lean-cut, a 



Please continue to keep Bill 4 
Kelli in your prayers and remembet 
they will continue to need your sup 
port. 



Writer warns students to think before acting 



Dawn Lund, Senior, 
Scholars' College 

I think a lot of us take Natchi- 
toches for granted. We think noth- 
ing really bad ever happens in 
Natchitoches. We have exchanges 
named "Drive by Shooting." What a 
really cool idea for an exchange, 
right? We don't realize the fear that 
some people live with in other areas 
of the country concerning gangs and 
gang shootings. We don't really 
have to deal with gangs at all. 

Judging from the number of 
people who walk on campus at night, 
we aren't worried about getting 
mugged or attacked. I mean, after 
all, this is Natchitoches, a quiet 
little city. There are other places 
where people don't even walk around 
alone in the daytime, much less at 
night. "Well, that's not a problem 
here in Natchitoches. So what's your 



Guest 



Phil 

Tea 



point?" you ask. My point is really 
very simple: bad things do happen 
in Natchitoches. 

It has been almost three years 
since a Northwestern student was 
shot and killed in the parking lot 
next to Cotton Patch. It has only 
been about two years since another 
NSU student was beaten severely 
and hospitalized by a gang here in 
Natchitoches, who call themselves 
the "Regulators." These Regulators 
are the same people who drove a car 
into a crowd of people at a fraternity 
party here on campus. Much more 
recently a young girl was kidnapped 
right off of a Natchitoches city street. 

I want people to realize that 
people do get hurt and killed in 
Natchitoches. For the most part, 
Natchitoches is a safe place to live 
and go to school, but that doesn't 
mean that you shouldn't use cau- 



tion in potentially dangerous situa- 
tions. Getting drunk and trying to 
start a fight is not, in my opinion, 
using caution. In my opinion, it is 
stupid and extremely immature. Do 
you realize that you are risking your 
life? Not only could you die, but you 
could bring your friends down with 
you. 

This isn't high school anymore. 
The principal is not going to come 
out and break up the fight before 
anyone gets hurt. When two 
drunken people get into a fight be- 
cause they're bored, someone spilled 
their drink or looked at their girl- 
friend wrong, sooner or later they 
are going to confront someone who 
doesn't play fair, and someone is 
going to die. Yes, die, right here in 
little old Natchitoches. 

A lot of people start fights and 
brag about them the next day. Usu- 



ally plans are made for revenge bj 
the one or ones that lost. Everyoi* 
ends up getting drunk, a few wori 
and maybe a few punches are & 
changed, and then it's over. Well* 
was supposed to happen like that* 
February 10,1989. It didn't. W 
Weyand died of a gunshot wound it 
Natchitoches Parish Hospital l* 
cause he met someone who didn^ 
know the rules and didn't play ft* 



Teacher e 
feg test s 
Frible tracl 
Itempts at < 
Wl nothinj 
toady failii 

As our yo 
*hool. they f 
tod for the 
tod for coll 

*6highsch( 
^ of bask 
^history,! 
"fences and 
f a second 1 
Ntheblai 
Dr. P oe , e 
Fn history \ 



History will repeat itself if 
don't learn from our mistakes. M*"' 
of us have had to wake up one n> offf 
ing to the realization that one of * 
friends was dead from a fight N*i 
night before . If you have been th* M 
or can just imagine for one sec " 
how it feels, you will underst^ 
that fighting just isn't worth it- 1 
simple. Just think before you 8 
Sometimes the simplest 




make all the difference in the 



Readers' Forum 



Tell the Sauce your opinion 



48 1 pack 
*! ded fc 

■^mberec 
M sper 
I "derfulm 
L 0r 'da af 
j^sentNi 
>ey Wo 

' 



The Current Sauce would like to introduce the new Reader's 
Forum, which is simply a call-in letter to the editor. It offers a way for 
people to ask questions, express concerns, and share ideas. 

We envision a great future for this feature, but we are also aware 
that this feature could be misused for the sole purpose of causing 
embarrassment and pain to others. 

We have no intention of allowing the feature to degenerate to the 
level of a gossip line nor well we allow it to become a political battle 
ground. Complaints and criticisms should be constructive in nature. 

It will be our responsibility to hold the line on this matter, and we 
have determined that each call we receive will be formally evaluated 
by an editorial committee composed of the editorial staff. No "one" 
individual will edit the calls. 



We will evaluate the calls for potential to inspire improvem eIlt .V 
any given area and then make a decision whether or not to publis'' 1 
Even if the call is not published, we may choose to do an indepen" 
followup on the matter. ^ 

To leave a message, just call our number at 357-5096 betw^ 
p.m. and 12 p.m. on weekdays and leave your name, classified' 
major, and a brief message. 

Readers' Forum is dedicated to our readers who requested 
opportunity to voice comments and ideas. 

Readers' Forum's future is in the hands of our readers 
participation will decide its place in the Sauce. 

The Current Sauce belongs to our readers. We are the carets 
Our mission is to be responsive to our readers. 



Naon a 
took 

,8 *<Whe 
Vied w 
\ u , c cessful 
>Jtos 
^ that 
'earn f, 
Vny. 
,(1 e of t 




5r 



!5. 19g 




15, 1991 



Opinion 



Page 9 



g uest Column 

*fred Taulbee, Jr. 



Readers' Forum 



alumni. 
Parish and 
elli'sandthf 
ou have on 



Hair today, fired tomorrow 

Long-haired 
freaky people 
need not apply 



People ask me why I've got long 
jjair, but I don't know. Why do other 
pys have short hair? I don't like 
the way my hair looks short. It's not 
a phallic symbol, and it's not a 
rebellious thing. I didn't grow my 
hair long because I wanted to be 
rebellious. I grew my hair long and 
became rebellious when managers 
thought the length of my hair had 
something to do with the quality of 
rwork. 

I was lucky enough to get a job at 
Alfalfa Video and Music, even 
though I had long hair. They needed 
jomeone who knew their product 
and could get their new music 
section off the ground. I left Alfalfa 
because of differences with a new 
manager. One of those differences 
m her suggesting that I get my 
hair cut, even though the district 
■ aanager had no qualms about it. 



I quit in early July with what I 
nought would be plenty of time to 
ind another job before the onslaught 
tf unemployed students arrived in 
late August. Seven weeks and more 
than 20 applications later, I was 
hired by ARA. 

Fast food managers use the 
arcuse of long hair getting in the 
i bod, blatantly ignoring the fact that 
| hey already have girls working for 
them who have long hair. Most 
fpsinesses want employees with the 
}ean-cut, ail-American look. But 



the ail-American look they want 
disappeared somewhere in the '50s 
when rock 'n' roll evolved. With 
rock 'n' roll came "long-haired freaky 
people," and you can't get more 
American than that. 

Experience is a major asset in 
applying for a job and I, like may of 
the other long hairs, don't lack 
experience. I spent some short- 
haired years in high school working 
for Burger King. I've delivered 
pizzas and newspapers. I've worked 
lor a construction company, a house 
painter, a farmer and a comic book 
store. I've even filmed music recitals 
for the music department. The few 
jobs available for long-haired men 
are mostly with entertainment- 
oriented businesses like nightclubs, 
radio stations and newspapers. 

Presentability is a major asset 
for a job interview, but long-haired 
freaky people" have come a long 
way since the frizzy look of the 70s. 
We've learned about split ends, pony 
tails, perms and hair-coloring, not 
to mention combs and brushes. This 
has taken a little of the "freaky" out 
of "long-haired freaky people." Even 
when I pick up applications, I put on 
a good pair of pants and a nice shirt. 

There are enough pay-hungry 
students in Natchitoches that 
managers can pick and choose, but 
they might as well hang up their 
signs: "Long-haired freaky people 
need not apply." 



Readers voice their opinions 
over the phone lines 



Students should vote 

1 just wanted to talk about 
Jason Oldham's article in the 
September 24 th Issue of the Cur- 
rent Sauce. For one thing, he has 
a little fact he needs to get 
straight. And that is that the 
election is October 19 th , so we 
don't have to wait 'til November to 
sit through those commercials. 

And also, he finishes his 
article by saying, "I don't care 
which belt you use, just whip me 
and get it over with." Well, this is 
kind of a bad attitude to put out 
in the Sauce because it makes 
students think that they don't 
have to care about which governor 
they get "beaten" by. And it's an 
issue that everyone should be 
concerned with. The governor of 
our state is not something to just 
get over with. 

We should all get out and 
vote on October 19." 



Parking still a problem 

"I'm complaining about the 
parking places at this school. I'm 
a resident of Rapides hall. I 
parked my car in what I though 
was a valid parking zone. When I 
parked my car there, I felt safe. 
The next morning, I wake up and 
there was a ticket on my car. 

First of all there was no "No 
Parking" sign there on that spot 
that says that I cannot park there. 
Then they're gonna charge me $5. 
That ticks me off, not to mention 
that when I called the police, they 
were real smart alecks with me 
and they gave me some junk that's 



not even valid like this is thereal 
world and things like this. 

Where the heck are we supposed 
to park? I've got an idea. Why 
don't we build some more flower 
beds around here and take away 
some more parking spots? Maybe 
we should all park in the flower 
beds. Maybe that would make 
them real happy!" 

Chop up the Demon 

"I think that they should take 
that demon statue, chop it up into 
little wood chips, and use it to 
fertilize some brand new trees to 
replace the one they cut down." 

KNWD doing great deed 

*/ think KNWD is really doing a 
good thing by organizing the 
greeting cards for Bill Britt. 
Northwestern has really pulled 
through for one of its own. 

Please lets not let Bill down." 



Unlock our doors 

"They issued master keys on east 
Rapides. So anyone can open all 
the doors. They picked up all the 
keys and have not given us new 
keys. We have to get an RA to 
unlock our doors every time we 
need to get into our room. They 
should refund our money for every 
day we have to get an RA. " 

Super Sports best ever 

"The Current Sauce has done an 
excellent job covering all the sports 
at Northwestern. 

The Super Sports section is one 
the I've seen in the Sauce. 

Don't forget about soccer." 



Any student may voice his opinion over 
the phone lines. Just call 357-5096 between 
the hours of 6 p.m. and 12 a.m af leave your 
message on the answering machine. 

We will print as many as possible. 
Inclusion of any statement is left to the 
discretion of the editor. 




» keep Bill 4 
ndremembet 
eedyoursup 



Guest Column 



Philip Wolfe 



Teacher evaluation program designed to catch bad instructors 



Teacher evaluations (or lack of), 
filing test scores statewide and a 
!°rrible track record in Louisiana's 
1 T"| Cf " te mpts at educating its populace 
W nothing but disaster for our 
taady failing economy. 
h I As our young people leave high 
r revenge ^hool, they find themselves unpre- 
st. Everyow pared for the workplace and unpre _ 

, a few wor"paTedfo rco ]iege. Students are leav- 

STii ni HU * h sch ° o1 with limited knowl - 

over - ^ ^ of basic mathematics, Ameri- 

to history • geography. th e natural 
jinxes and English. The prospect 
iot wound' jf asecond language is ^ 

TA-3* Hhe blame for all of this lie? 
i . f %■ V*- p °e, a respected Northwest- 
In t play »»; ^history professor, has often said 

t itself if* — 

stakes. 

uponem*** ^ 
latoneofj 
i a fight * 
ve been th* 1 ! 
r one seco*J 
undersell 
worth it- n 
fore youH 
>lest thiw 
in the**! 



that we, the younger generation, cio 
not get the same education as he 
received. It is not that students of 
today are less intelligent than pre- 
vious generations but we have not 
been exposed in a way that would 
inspire us to further our learning of 
such subjects as literature, history 
or the sciences. If there is no inter- 
est generated that would make us 
want to learn more, then our desire 
to remember what we learned is 
limited. Sadly, this trend of igno- 
rance is not slowing down but accel- 
erating at disastrous speeds. 

Although the state government 
is attempting to remedy this prob- 



lem with first-aid measures like 
teacher evaluations, which are des- 
perately needed, the problems have 
multiplied because the state waited 
so long to begin solving them. The 
problems have been mentioned ear- 
lier, but the solutions are hardlv 
being discussed outside of the aca- 
demic community. 

I do not blame entirely the teach- 
ers for these problems, but there is 
blame laying before their feet. 
Teacher evaluation programs are 
designed to "catch" those teachers 
who are deficient, but the only way 
to extinguish this flame of igno- 
rance is to go to the real source. The 
real source is not so much the teach- 



ers, but rather the education de- 
partments from which they came. 
It is these education departments 
who are turning out deficient teach- 
ers. They allow the Board of Re- 
gents to dictate to them a curricu- 
lum that they know is ineffective 
and refuse to stand up to the Board. 
A student complaining about this 
will get nothing done. One professor 
complaining of this will get nothing 
done. But a department as a whole 
pressing the issue, which will have 
the backing of the rest of the univer- 
sity, can change a policy. 

Northwestern's Department of 
Education under the guidelines of 



the Louisiana State Board of Re- 
gents requires that a student must 
take 30 credit hours of education 
courses in order to receive a teach- 
ing certificate. However, 30 credit 
hours in education is simply unnec- 
essary. Six hours or. at the most, 12 
should be taken in education, and 
the rest should be in what the sub- 
ject the teacher plans to teach. This 
state has produced teachers who 
have learned "how" to teach but not 
"what" to teach. 

It is the opinion of many full, 
associate and assistant professors, 
as well as many students, that the 
education department and the 



Board of Regents are producing the 
wrong type of teachers. 

My own experience as a swim 
coach has taught me that if you 
don't know what you are teaching 
then you can't teach others what 
you are supposed to be teaching 
them. In high school, I was lucky to 
have had good teachers who made 
the subjects interesting, but I have 
also been exposed to teachers who 
don't seem to know what they are 
talking about. If more and more 
teachers are being taught only how 
to teach and not what to teach, this 
society, statewide and nationwide, 
will crumble. We cannot survive as 
a land of ignorance. 



Quest Column 

Tina Foret 



^Valt Disney World vs. Northwestern State University 



ove 



ment' 



3 publish j 
ridepe^" 

i 

i betwee" 
issificat^ 



:quested " 



iers. 



care 



i ^8 I packed my mouse-ears and 
J^ed for Natchitoches, I 
limbered my fun-filled summer. 

a< l spent three of the most 
k n< Jerful months of my life in sunny 
° r 'da after being chosen to 
jJ^sent Northwestern at the Walt 
^y World College Summer 
j, fram. I worked in the newest 
^ction at Disney-MGM studios, 
P took 10 business seminars 
8et! on the Walt Disney Company, 
^^ed with the knowledge from 
l^cessful company, I raced back 
l SU to share the information. I 

p that Northwestern had a lot 
I ea rn from the Walt Disney 

\» a ne of the first policies that I 

"Produced to at WDW was to 

tL. ress my fellow cast members by 

t^. r first names. Can you imagine 

h, '"S a custodial host address his 
"Pery-- ... - 



isor by his first name? 



"Hello, Bob. How are things in 
the executive office?" 

"Oh just fine, and how are things 
with you, Tom?" 

"Okay, I guess. A kid left a 
•protein spill' by the exit of Space 
Mountain that I had to clean up." 

"You're doing a great job. Have a 
good one." 

Now, seriously answer this 
question. How many times have 
you really wanted to ask your 
professor a question but you felt so 
intimidated that you just remained 
silent and nodded your head? Can 
you imagine if you addressed your 
professor by his first name? 
Depending on the professor, he 
would either talk to you as an equal 
or say: "Uh, that's Mr. Professor X 
to you!" 

Everyone knows of at least one 
professor who has the "I am God 
and you are dirt" syndrome. I dare 



any ol these teachers to attempt to 
talk to a student as an equal . Maybe 
they are just scared they will 
actually receive a highly intelligent 
response. Every student on this 
campus has his own special abilities. 
Maybe it might not be that 
particular subject that the professor 
is teaching, but the student could be 
stronger in another subject. For 
instance, I simply love English, but 
I do not know a thing about how to 
fix the carburetor in my Escort. Does 
that make me inferior? Maybe some 
teachers should think about the way 
they treat their students before they 
stereotype them as inferior. 
Professors have carburetor 
problems, too. 

The Disney company stressed 
the importance of teamwork to me. 

"If there are no custodial hosts 
around and you see a piece of paper, 
just pick it up. It does not matter if 



you work in attractions, you are still 
part of a team, and everyone works 
together," said Alan, my orientation 
instructor. 

Everyone at WDW pulls together 
as a family in order to provide a 
quality guest experience. Not only 
do they look out for the guest, but 
they also look out for each other. 
For instance, it is not bizarre to see 
someone on break helping another 
cast member while things are busy. 
Everyone treats each other with 
respect whether they drive 
monorails or give VIP tours. 

This question goes out to those of 
you participating in organizations. 
How many times have you helped 
someone only to be stabbed in the 
back by a power hungry social 
climber? You know the types, the 
certain students who run for an 
office only to gain another 



accomplishment on their resumes. 
"Hello, my name John M. 

Wonderful and I am running for 
president of your organization?' 

"Well, what do you have to offer 
my organization?" 

"The opportunity to look 
sensational." 

"How?" 

"By having such a gorgeous guy 
as your president." 

Maybe if Mr. Wonderful paid 
more attention to how to make his 
organization work as a team, there 
would be a lot less tension from his 
members. 

It seems like everyone wants to 
be John Wonderful, president of a 
fraternity and also the most 
wonderful leader in every club. I 

think it is great that so many people 



want to lead, but what happens if 
there are no followers? Maybe the 
most important person is the 
follower. After all, they are the ones 
who actually get the job done. Most 
of the time, they are also the ones 
who receive no credit for their 
projects. Instead, the credit usually 
ends up on John Wonderful's 
resume. On the other hand, Mr. 
Wonderful will have a nice time 
trying to escape his 'fantasyland' in 
the real world. 

My work study program at 
Disneyworld taught me many 
things, but I believe the most 
important one was how to be 
respectful of others. Everyone 
knows of the golden rule: "Do unto 
others as you would have them do 
unto you." This university has such 
a promising future, let's not let this 
important rule slip through our 
fingers. 



Page 10 



Lifestyle 



October 15, }g 




T h 



a n 



G 



i n n y ! 



The Kentucky Headhunted will perform at 8 p.m.Saturday in Prather Coliseum as part of Homecoming '91 activities. 
Opening for the act will be guitarist Danny Gatton. Tickets are on sale in room 214 of the Student Union. 

Kentucky Headhunters to perform 
Group redefines country music sound, look 




The Kentucky Headhunters, an 
act which has redefined the sound 
and appearance of country music, 
will appear in concert at 8 p.m. 
Friday in Prather Coliseum as part 
of Northwestern Homecoming '91 
activities. 

The Headhunters blew onto the 
country music scene with their first 
album, Pickin'On Nashville, a self- 
produced album cut during a $4,500 
recording session. 

Pickin' On Nashville was an im- 
mediate success with one critic call- 
ing it "honest-to-God-biscuits-and- 
gravy rock 'n' roll." The album sold 
a half-million copies faster than any 
other debut album by a group in the 
liistory of country music. 

After reaching platinum in just 
50 weeks, the album is nearing 
double-platinum in both the United 
States and Canada. 

Quick success came to the group 
that went from playing in 300-seat 
clubs to opening for Hank Williams 
Jr. in 20,000-seat arenas in only six 



months. They won the "Top New 
Group Award" presented by the 
Academy of Country Music in 1990. 
Last October, they won three Coun- 
try Music Association awards in- 
cluding "Vocal Group of the Year," 
"Producers of the Year" and "Album 
of the Year." 

Their second album, Electric 
Barnyard, has sold over a half-mil- 
lion copies. 

The band consists of brothers 
Richard and Fred Young and cousin 
Greg Martin, who have played to- 
gether since the 1960s, and broth- 
ers Doug and Ricky Lee Phelps. 

The Youngs and Martin played 
together for 20 years without get- 
ting a record deal . The three teamed 
with the Phelps brothers to form 
the Kentucky Headhunters in 1986. 

Part of the group's appeal may be 
in the diversity of its music. The 
Headhunters' music shows the in- 
fluence of psychedelic, jazz, rock, 
blues and bluegrass music. 

Another part of their appeal may 
be their "look." 

"I'm sure our look has hurt us," 
said Richard Young. "We might have 
been male models if we didn't look 
the way we did. But I think people 



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OCTOBER 17 
7:30pm 
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Start Signing up on Tuesday 



Come Celebrate 

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with the crew at 
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Now available: 
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Come give it a try! 



are looking more from the heart. I 
don't think people are spending their 
time on first impressions. I think 
that's good." 

Opening for the act will be gui- 
tarist Danny Gatton, who has been 
called "the world's greatest un- 
known guitarist." 

Gatton recently released his first 
album, 88 Elmira Street, which re- 
ceived good reviews. 

Gatton has learned the art of 
playing the guitar from a diverse 
group of musicians, all of whom are 
among the best. He's played with 
country artists Roy Clark, Chet 
Atkins and Merle Travis, rocker 
Duane Eddy and jazz musicians Les 
Paul, Wes Montgomery, George 
Benson, Pat Martino and Charles 
Byrd. 

Ticket prices are $7 for North- 
western students and employees, 
but there is a limit of two tickets per 
person at this price. General admis- 
sion tickets are $12 and $15 on the 
day of the show. Tickets are avail- 
able in room 214 of the Student 
Union, the University Bookstore, 
Natchitoches Music, the NSU-Fort 
Polk campus and A&A Western 
Store in Alexandria. 



Leisure Activities 
2nd Annual Ghost Chase 

ROW -RIDE -RUN 
Thursday, October 31st 
4:30pm, Chaplins' Lake Canoe Shed 




3 Person Teams 



FREE T-Shirts To All Participants 
Student and Faculty/Staff Divisions 

For More Information Please Call 357-5461 



Peddler s 



352-1555 
247 Kyser 
Natchitoches 



FOOTBALL 

Special!!! 



Bye One PizzaGet Two FREE!!!! 

Every Monday through November 30th 



Hours 

Friday and 
Satuday 
1 lam- 12am 
Sunday thru Thursday 
1 lam- 10am 




\\\ 

"Peddler 's 




352-1555 

247 Keyser Ave., 
Natchitoches 



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We appreciate your input! 
Thank you for the 
overwhelming response for the 
Consumer Survey. 



Faculty /Staff Luncheon 
Wednesday, October 1 6 

12 noon- 1 pm 
Take your Boss to lunch on 
"National Bosses Day" 




Monday Night Football 

October 21st 
Prizes, Drawings, Special 

Tuesday- October 15th 

00 M©qdOli©©i?S 00 

7pm 



IBERVlLLi 

October 15 
Fresh Start Breakfas 

-chesse grits, sausage eggs 
-fresh fruit raffles, pancakes 
and much, much, more 



October 17 i 
The intern oaf, one and f c *nfy 



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Editorial 

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News 

Teachers Win 
Awards, page 3 



Current Sauce 



Tuesday 

October 22, 1991 
Volume 80, Number 12 



Northwestern State University 



Sawyer 

named 

director 

pr. Robert Sawyer has been 
„ained the new director of programs 
forthe gifted and talented at North- 
western. 

Sawyer hopes he can utilize the 
Ijjgh concentration of resources for 
^ academically talented at North- 
western to create successful pro- 
the gifted and talented can 
utilize- 

He grew up in Iowa and earned 
his Ph.D. at the University of Wyo- 
ming. He went to Duke University 
as an intern under the Chancellor 
and Provost and later became a full- 
time administrator. 

He was at Duke for 15 years, 
developing Duke's Talent Identifi- 
cation Program, the largest program 
in the country for identifying aca- 
demically talented secondary school 
students. He has also done consult- 
jngwork with the White House Com- 
mission on Presidential Scholars. 

"After 15 years at Duke, my wife 
and I decided to do something else 
different in a different location," said 
Sawyer. "I had done some consult- 
ing work here before and one thing 
that impressed me about this area 
is the unusually high concentration 
of resources for the academically 
talented. We have the Louisiana 
School for Math, Science and the 
Art right here and the Louisiana 
Icholars' College with a most ca- 
pable faculty and a very supportive 
idministr ation that serves as a cata- 
lyst." 

Sawyer previously worked with 
Northwestern administrators as a 
consultant, setting up a cooperative 
program with Duke University, hop- 
ing to continue the close ties be- 
tween the two schools. 

Among his plans are to offer two 
summer programs at Northwest- 
ern beginning in June for gifted 
students. 

A Young Scholars' Precollege 
Program will be held J une 7 through 
July 17 next year. The program is 
feigned for students who have just 
•"mpleted their junior year in high 
school. Students in the program will 
toroll in one university course dur- 
•"geach three-week summer term. 

Classes, taught on the introduc- 
'"ry level, are offered in the hu- 
manities, social science, natural sci- 
"H*, mathematical science or corn- 
Piter science. These classes are part 
°f Northwestern 's curriculum, and 
ttedit will be given for the courses. 

Northwestern will also offer the 
Advance Summer Residential Pro- 
frain for verbally and mathemati- 
gifted and talented youth from 
Ju ne 7 through June 27. 

Students ages 12-16 are encour- 
^ e d to apply for the program, which 
""fers intensive, fast-paced courses 
' n the humanities, social sciences, 
"atural sciences, mathematics and 
^puter science. 

The program allows students to 
^ r °H in one course and complete 
6 equivalent of one year of high 

I Pi 

r 'ease see Director on page 6 



Passing the crown 




Linda Davis, Homecoming Queen 1990, crowns Tammy Clary, the 1991 Homecoming Queen. Clary and her court were 
presented during halftime at the football game on Saturday. Clary is a senior humanities and social thought major in the 
Louisiana Scholars' College. 

Homecoming '91 football game 
attendance tops 10,100 



By MICHELLE GENRE 

News Editor 

With attendance topping 10,100 
at this year's Demon Homecoming 
football game, student participation 
proved Homecoming '91 to be a no- 
ticeable success. 

"I think the whole week went 
really well. We had lots of student 
participation, and they had fun par- 
ticipating," said Carl Henry, direc- 
tor of Student Activities and Orga- 
nizations. "The Homecoming Court 
and their families also enjoyed the 
activities planned for them." 

The week-long activities began 
Oct. 14, with the annual Homecom- 
ing Treasure Hunt. Surprisingly, 
the treasure was found on the first 
day by Shena Williams. Williams 
was awarded with $200 in cash for 
locating the winning token near 
Russell Hall by using the hints 
printed on the marquee in front of 
the Student Union. 

Later that night, Brad Morrow 
was named "Homecoming Hunnie" 
for the second consecutive year by 
Homecoming Court judges. This 
male beauty pageant is a pun in 
which contestants "strut their stuff" 



in front of a panel of judges. 

Following the pageant, 
Northwestern students competed in 
the SAB Star Search by proving 
their talents in one of the female 
vocal, male vocal and open divi- 
sions. 

Throughout the week, a banner 
contest was underway with groups 
and organizations designing ban- 
ners and showing their Demon 
spirit. Winners of the competition 
were STUN in the organization di- 
vision and the fourth floor of Sabine 
Hall in the residence hall division. 

Another highlight of the week's 
activities was the annual Festival 
Follies, also sponsored by SAB. 
Participating were 25 teams made 
up of six students each. They took 
part in games and activities such as 
a three-legged race, an egg toss, an 
airplane toss, a water balloon relay, 
an obstacle course and a pie throw- 
ing contest in which, several of 
Northwestern's professors took pies 
in their face. First place was won by 
the "Stunners;" second place by 
"Folly's Fools;" and third place by 
"The Big Cheese." 

Later that evening, members of 



the Homecoming Court were hon- 
ored in Iberville Dining Hall during 
a special dinner. 

On Thursday, the city of Natchi- 
toches enjoyed the traditional Home- 
coming Parade composed of floats 
created by many of Northwestern's 
organizations and clubs. The win- 
ner of the float competition was the 
Student Nurses.' Association in the 
organization division, Phi Mu Fra- 
ternity in the Greek division, and 
Rapides Hall in the residence divi- 
sion. 

During the entire week, more 
than 500 Homecoming T-shirts were 
sold at $5 per shirt. The theme of 
the week, "Pride and Ambition — A 
Northwestern Tradition," was 
printed on the shirts to promote 
student awareness and participa- 
tion. 

Friday was full of activities such 
as Purple and White Day, Spirit 
Button Day, Paint Your Car Day 
and finally, one of the main high- 
lights of the week, the Kentucky 
Headhunters Concert. The concert 
was held in Prather Coliseum, and 

■ Please see Game on page 6 



Leakey says wildlife 
will affect future 



By MARIA E. JONES and 
KATHRYN E. SIMMS 

Staff Writers 

The fate of humanity rests with 
endangered wildlife, said Dr. Rich- 
ard Leakey, and the health of ani- 
mals has a direct correlation to that 
of mankind. 

"If we allow wildlife to become 
extinct, world political systems will 
also fail when it comes to people," 
said the director of Wildlife maga- 
zine and chairman of the National 
Museums of Kenya in his Oct. 17 
lecture in the A. A. Fredericks Fine 
Arts Auditorium. 

The topic of Leakey's speech was 
"Can We Save the Elephants?", but 
he said man should focus on saving 
all endangered species and, in turn, 
himself. 

"I think the elephant should be 
seen as a symbol of wildlife and 
wildlife in a part of the environ- 
ment, which if it is not saved, we 
will not save ourselves. I don't think 
any of us can doubt that the health 
of the planet will relate directly to 
our ability to survive as a viable 
species If society doesn't save wild- 
life, it cannot save itself," he said. 

According to Leakey, public 
awareness is the most important 
factor in saving animals from dis- 
tinction. Leakey said that of all forms 
of living things, 97 percent became 
extinct since the beginning of life, 
and of the 3 percent that remains, 
some will soon vanish without the 
world realizing it. Some species 
could become extinct "simply 
through the stupidity of the way we 
do things — greed, lack of foresight 
and human failure of that kind." 

The elephant population is not 
the only one to dwindle, but it is the 
best example. Leakey said that in a 
10-year period prior to 1989, half of 
these animals were killed simply 
for the ivory in their tusks by com- 
mercial hunters armed with AK-47 



semi-automatic rifles and hand gre- 
nades. Some park rangers also lost 
their lives when they attempted to 
stop the poachers. 

Leakey said steps were taken to 
have a ban placed on ivory because 
people used it for jewelry and other 
decorative items. In 1989, a moun- 
tain of confiscated ivory was burned 
to draw worldwide attention to the 
problem. After the ban was initi- 
ated, the price of ivory dropped from 
$30 per pound to $2 per pound. It 
was then no longer profitable to 
slaughter the elephant, said Leakey, 
and in the last 15 months not a 
single elephant has lost its life to a 
poacher. 

The rhinoceros population was 
not as lucky as the elephants, 
though. The ban on that animal's 
horns was not as effective as that 
placed on ivory because the horns 
are in demand in Far East markets. 
Thought to have medicinal value 
and believed to be an aphrodisiac, 
rhino horn actually "...consists of 
the same material that your finger- 
nails are made of, and for any of you 
in the audience who have suffered 
from impotence, you know full well 
that chewing your fingernails , which 
you've probably done, doesn't help 
anyway," Leakey said. 

Leakey said elephants are sensi- 
tive animals and are family oriented. 

"They are exquisitely beautiful, 
they are huge, they're delicate, and 
the more we study, them the more 
we realize they are incredibly intel- 
ligent. The competitive social be- 
havior of elephants is being likened 
to the competitive behavior of our 
closest relatives, chimpanzees and 
gorillas. 

"There is no doubt that elephants 
know one another, live in families, 
communicate with one another, feel 
grief, feel anger, feel sorrow, and 
they are clearly very like ourselves 
in much of what they do," said 
Leakey. 




Inside 




^lendar 


2 


^pus Connection 


3 


U f estyle 


12 


^sin Brief 


2 


^Pinions 


11 


-<ction Coverage 


8-9 


^PerSports 


6 


5)lSauce Poll 


11 


Student Newspaper 
jy ° r thwestern State University 
^hitoches, Louisiana 






357-5456 





Football game to be televised 

Demons to play Indians before millions of spectators 



Richard Leakey, chairman of the National Museums of Kenya.spoke aT 
Northwestern on Oct. 17. Leakey believes that endangered wildlife has a direct 
relationship with the fate of humanity. 



The Northwestern Demon vs. Northeast Indians 
game at 7 p.m. Saturday will be televised live by Home 
Sports Entertainment, a Houston-based cable sports 
network with exposure in a five state region and se- 
lected national markets. 

Northwestern is one of three Southland Conference 
schools to host an HSE game. This game is an impor- 
tant step in the Demons quest for the SLC champion- 
ship and national playoff bid. 

"We are looking forward to hosting a major televi- 
sion event that will showcase Northwestern and Natchi- 
toches. We want our students to participate in a festive 
college football atmosphere. The cameras will convey 
this excitement to the viewing audience," said Greg 
Burke, assistant athletic director. 

Several activities are planned to encourage student 
involvement. Leisure Activities is sponsoring a banner 
painting party. Sheets, paint, pizza and soft drinks will 
be provided at the Intramural gym from 7 to 9 p.m. 
today and Wednesday. Cash prizes are available for 



open, dorm and Greek entries. 

The men's and women's champions from Northwest- 
ern and NLU will compete in a flag football challenge 
on game day. 

The Northeast marching band, cheerleaders and 
students have been invited to the pregame tailgate 
party sponsored by the Student Activities Board. The 
band "Ace" will be the featured entertainment. SAB 
will provide face-painting as well. 

At the game that night, signs with slogans such as 
"Hi mom, send money" will be distributed, as well as 
spirit towels and fans. 

Students are invited to come onto the field at 6:45 
p.m. with banners, signs and towels to form "The 
Tunnel" for the Demons to run through. The Tunnel is 
becoming a tradition at Demon football games. 

This show of support along with the spirit of the 
Northwestern Northeast rivalry will create a positive 
image for the three million viewers watching the tele- 
cast, according to Burke. 




Thel991 Southland Conference HSE 
football schedule: 

Oct. 12 7pm CST Southwest Texas at 
Stephen F. Austin 

Oct. 26 7pm CST Northeast Louisiana at 
Northwestern State 

Nov. 2 7pm CST North Texas at 
McNeese State 

Nov. 16 5pm CST Northeast Louisiana at 
Stephen F. Austin 

The 1992 Southland Conference HSE 
basketball schedule: 

Jan. 25 5pm CDT Northeast Louisiana at 
Sam Houston State 

Feb. 10 7:30pm CDT Nicholls State at 
Northwestern State 

Feb. 15 5pm CDT North Texas at 
. Texas-Arlington (site change) 

Feb. 29 5pm CDT Texas-San Antonio at 
Stephen F. Austin 



Calendar 
of Events 

today 

7 p.m. 

SAB Movie Night features 
Dances with Wolves in 
The Alley. 

Volleyball officials clinic in 
room 114 of the IM building 

7:30 p.m. 

Final night for 'Tartuffe,' the 
Northwestern Theatre 
production in Theatre West 

WEDNESDAY 

Greek Day 
9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Make-up yearbook pictures in 
room 232, Student Union 

5 p.m. 

IM volleyball registration 
deadline 

THURSDAY 

8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Midterm grades given out to 
non-dormitory students 

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Make-up yearbook pictures in 

room 232, Student Union 

11 a.m. 

Pep Rally in the front of 
Student Union 

7 p.m. 

SAB Star Search in The Alley 
FRIDAY 

8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Midterm grades given to non- 
dormitory students 

SATURDAY 

3 p.m. 

Tailgate Party at Prather 
Coliseum parking lot 

7 p.m. 

Demons take on Northeast 
Indians at Turpin Stadium 

Midnight 

Daylight Savings Time, set 
clock back one hour 



CO 
CO 

GO 
I 

CM 
lO 
CO 



October 22, 19^ 



News In Brief 



Terminally ill boy wants 
to set get well card 
record 

Natchitoches businesses 
and residents already have 
been asked to help in making 
a little boy's dream come true. 
The Current Sauce is now 
asking Northwestern stu- 
dents, faculty and staff to 
help Craig Shergold make his 
wish a reality. 

Shergold, a 7-year-old boy 
with an inoperable brain 
tumor, wants to be included 
in the "Guiness Book of Word 
Records" for the largest 
number of get well cards 
received. 

Cards should be sent to 
Craig Shergold, do Make a 
Wish Foundation, 32 
Petrimeter Center East, 
Atlanta, GA, 30346. 

Business center to 
present workshop 

The Small Business 
Development Center and 
International Paper Company 
will present a Quality 
Awareness Workshop from 
8:30 a.m. until noon Thursday 
in the Cane River Rooin of the 
Student Union. 

Jim Kilcoyne, senior 
forester at International 
Paper in Natchitoches, will 
conduct the workshop. He has 
been a team leader and 
facilitator in International 
Papers Quality Program 
since 1984. Kilcoyne has 
attended workshops con- 
ducted by the American 
Society of Quality Engineers 
and Statistical Quality 
Control Workshops at 
Memphis State University. 

Workshop topics will 
include "What is Quality?," 
"Quality History— The Gurus 
of Quality and Japanese 
Style," "Steps in Implement- 
ing a Quality Program," 
"Systematic Approaches to 
Quality," and "Quality 
Process Improvement." 




Doug Phelps, left, and Richard Young, members of the Kentucky Headhunters, 
performed last Friday at Prather Coliseum. 

There is no fee for the 
workshop. Enrollment is on a 
first come, first serve basis, and 
preregistration is required. For 
more information, call the Small 
Business Development Center 
at 357-5611. 



8 a.m. until 1 1p.m., Friday 
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m., 
Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 
p.m. and Sunday from 2 p.m. 
until 11 p.m. 



-• — - -■■ ' 




The Strips Only 
Drive-In 

1 1 am- 1 2pm 
Weekdays 
1 1 am-4pm 
Weekends 



CO 
O 

00 

CO 
■ 

CM 

m 

CO 



AH Baba is a Basket Case 
Every Wednesday Night 
5pm til 2am 



Any Basket: Steak finger Basket 

Chicken finger Basket 
Catfish Basket 
Meat Pies Basket 
Jumbo Shrimp Basket 

For only $1*99 

NSU I.D. required 



Library to display history, 
future of education 

The Eugene P. Watson 
Memorial Library will host 

displays on Northwestern's past 
and future in Louisiana educa- 
tion. 

An exhibit on the history of 
Northwestern, which focuses on 
the time when it was known as 
Louisiana State Normal College, 
will be displayed on the third 
floor of the library. The exhibit 
will run through the end of 
October. 

Also on the third floor, an 
exhibit consisting of photo- 
graphs of old Louisiana school- 
houses will be on display 
through the month of November. 
The exhibit is part of the Center 
for the History of Louisiana 
Collection. 

The Watson Library is open 
Monday through Thursday from 



Classical Association to 
hold state meet at NSU 

Hosted by the Louisiana 
Scholars' College, the Louisi- 
ana Classical Association will 
hold its annual state organiza- 
tional meeting on campus 
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1-2. 

Registration and a welcom- 
ing reception will be held from 
4 p.m. until 7 p.m. on Nov. 1 in 
Russell Hall. Following the 
reception, the Northwestern 
Theatre will present selections 
from Aristophanes' 
"Lysistrata" in the Alley 
located in the Friedman 
Student Union. 

Sessions will be held on 
Nov. 2 from 9 a.m until noon 
and from 1:30 until 3 p.m. 

Members of the LCA will 
deliver papers on a variety of 
classical topics. Dr. Jean 
D'Amato of the LSC will 
present a paper covering 
research she did under a grant 



from the Council of University 
Research Institutional 
Administrators and the 
National Endowment for the 
Humanities. 

"We want to bring in the 
components of the entire 
university for this meeting," 
said D'Amato, vice president 
of the association. 

The LCA has been in 
operation for six years. It is a 
regional branch of the 
Classical Association of the 
Midwest and South. The 
association consists of teach- 
ers on the elementary, 
secondary and college levels 
and persons who are inter- 
ested in the classics. 

9 students receive 
Cooley scholarships 

Nine Northwestern 
students have been selected 
as recipients of the Esther 
Cooley Memorial Scholarship, 
according to Dr. Virginia 
Crossno, head of the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics. 

Those receiving the 
scholarship are Todd Barrios, 
a junior hospitality and 
institutional services major 
from Kenner; Anita Brooks, a 
senior home economics major 
from Leesville; Mary Jones, a 
senior early childhood 
education major from 
Natchez, La.; and Anjanette 
Lee, a junior hospitality and 
institutional services major 
from Shreveport. 

Other recipients are Amy 
O'Con, a senior early child- 
hood education major from 
Natchitoches; Julie Stuart, a 
junior hospitality and institu- 
tional services major from 
Haughton; Raquel Wiley, a 
sophomore home economics 
major from Effie; and Helen 
Williams, a freshman hospi- 
tality and institutional 
services major from Humble, 
Texas. 

Judith Caraway of 
Winnfield received an Esther 
Cooley Graduate Scholarship. 



Current 
Sauce 



P.O. Box 5306 
Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71497 



(UPS 140 - 660) 



How to reach the Sauce; 

To subscribe to The Sauce 

Subscriptions 357-5213 



To place an ad 

Local ads 
National ads 



357-5456 
357-5213 



Question about billing 

Sales Manager 357-545$ 
Business Manager 357-5213 

To contact the news 
department 

Campus Connection 357-5456 

Editorial/Opinion 357-5096 

Lifestyles 357-5456 

News 357-5456 

Photography 357-5293 

Sports 357-5456 



The Current Sauce is located ij 
the Office of Student Publications in 
225 Kyser Hall. 

The Current Sauce is published 
every week during the fall by the 
students of North western State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not associ- 
ated with any of the university's de- 
partments and is financed indepen- 
dently, j 

The deadline for all advertise- 
ments is 5 p.m. the Thursday be- 
fore publication. 

Inclusion of any and all mate- 
rial is left to the discretion of the 
editor. 

The Current Sauce will not be 
printed on November 26, 1991 due to 
the university's Thanksgiving Holi- 
day. 

The Current Sauce is entered ai 
second-class mail at Natchitoches, 
LA. 

Postmaster: send address changes to 
Current Sauce, P.O. Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 
i Current Sauce 



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Lt. John Dunbar is about to disco' 


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ACADEMY 
AWARD 
WINNING 

tonight in 
the' Alley 
7 p.m. 

TAILGATE PARTY VI 
3 TO 6 P.M. 
COLISEUM 
PARKING LOT 

presenting 



ACE 



Qctober 22, 1991 



News 



Page 3 



CAMPUS CONNECTION 



pan hellenic 

Greek Day 1991 will be held on 
Wednesday. All Greeks are invited 

attend the "Greeks Come Out at 
Vight" dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. in 
he Alley- Pictures will be taken 

j T-shirts will be available. 

^ penny toss will be held in the 
5tudent Union today through Fri- 
^y. The Greek organization which 
collects the most pennies receives 
the money. The money will be 
donated to the winner's philan- 
thropy- 

All Greeks should wear their let- 
ters on Wednesday. 

Anthropology Club 

The Anthropology Club will have 
g meeting at noon Wednesday in 
the archaeology lab. 



Student Louisiana Association 
of Educators 

Student Louisiana Association 
of Educators will have a meeting at 
3 p.m. Wednesday in room C-247 of 
the TEC Computer Lab. Guest 
speakers will lecture on resumes 
and job interviews. There will also 
be refreshments and door prizes. 

Everyone is invited to attend and 
join the organization. Dues are $20 
per year. For more information, call 
Dr. Bob Gillian at 357-5091. 

Pan-Hellenic 

There will be a meeting at 11 
a.m. Thursday in room 316 of the 
Student Union. All active members 
are asked to be present for officer 

elections. 




Photo by Tony Means 

Pom-pon line member Beth Beadle cheers for the Demons at the Homecom- 
ing pep rally held last Thursday on the riverbank in downtown Natchitoches. 



Snowden presents 
paper at I